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Why are rainforests being destroyed?

Why are rainforests being destroyed?
Humans are the main cause of rainforest destruction. We are cutting down rainforests for many reasons, including: In 2005 and 2010 the Amazon experienced the worst droughts ever recorded. Rivers dried up, isolating communities, and millions of acres burned. The smoke caused widespread health problems, interfered with transportation, and blocked the formation of rain clouds, while the burning contributed huge amounts of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, worsening the effects of climate change. Meanwhile, Indonesia has experienced several severe droughts in recent decades. ** The vast majority of scientists believe that human activities are contributing to climate change. By Rhett Butler

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News: Rain Forest For centuries, humans have relied on rain forests for a variety of products. Foods such as tomatoes, peppers, corn, rice, coconuts, bananas, coffee, cocoa, tapioca, beans, and sweet potatoes all originally came from the rain forest. Many civilizations have exploited the timber in rain forests and cleared the land for farms. Endangered Animals List Animal endangerment is a big environmental issue, and the number of endangered animals is constantly on the rise. See the IUCN definitions of different types of animal endangerment here. Below is a list of some of the most popular endangered animals, according to the IUCN classification.

Scientists: air pollution led to more than 5.5 million premature deaths in 2013 Air pollution caused more than 5.5 million people to die prematurely in 2013, according to research presented on Friday, with more than half of those deaths in India and China and illnesses in those countries almost certain to rise. According to scientists from the US, Canada, China and India, who presented their findings at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington DC, conditions caused by air pollution killed 1.6 million people in China and 1.4 million people in India in 2013. “Air pollution is the fourth-highest risk factor for death globally and by far the leading environmental risk factor for disease,” said Michael Brauer, a researcher from the University of British Columbia. Brauer said air pollution contributed to heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, bronchitis, emphysema and acute infections. Coal pollution alone killed 366,000 people in China in 2013, according to researcher Qiao Ma.

Rain Forest In Brazil, which houses 30 percent of the remaining tropical rain forest on Earth, more than 50,000 square miles of rain forest were lost to deforestation between 2000 and 2005. Biologists worry about the long-term consequences. Drought may be one. About Ecological Footprint Right now we consume the equivalent of 1.5 planets' worth of natural resources every year! Did you know that if everyone on the planet lived like the average American, we would need 5 Earths to sustain our lifestyle? Where does that number come from? By determining how many hectares of land humans need to support their lifestyle and comparing it to the amount of arable land found on the planet, scientists are able to measure the impact of human demand on the planet’s eco systems, which is called our ecological footprint. Globally, all humanity consumes the equivalent of 1.5 planets' worth of resources to sustain the way we live each year. This means that it takes the planet one and a half years to replenish everything humans consume in one year.

This Drone Startup Has An Ambitious (Crazy) Plan To Plant 1 Billion Trees A Year The world burns or cuts down about 26 billion trees a year. It replants about 15 billion. You can see the shortfall. At the moment, we're not planting trees quickly enough to combat deforestation—a problem with big implications for climate change. That's why Lauren Fletcher wants to automate the process with drone technology.

Why is Plastic Pollution a Problem in Our Oceans? A sea turtle spots a plastic bag floating among the waves. To him, it looks like a jellyfish, its general shape and consistency swaying and catching the light in just the right way. He swims toward it and ingests the bag in one gulp, satisfying his hunger, and then goes on his away. In actuality, that plastic bag lines his gut, causing digestive blockages and the sea turtle’s eventual death from starvation. This is why a sea turtle could confuse a plastic bag with a jellyfish (Plastic Pollution Coalition)

Rain Forest Threats, Rain Forest Species More than half of Earth’s rain forests have already been lost forever to the insatiable human demand for wood and arable land. Rain forests that once grew over 14 percent of the land on Earth now cover only about 6 percent. And if current deforestation rates continue, these critical habitats could disappear from the planet completely within the next hundred years. Serious game Click on the image to start the game Scenario For more than a century people have been using and depleting energy resources carefree, as if they were endless. In 2020 the world could find itself in a deadlock.

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