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10 Scientific Studies That Prove Consciousness Can Alter Our Physical World

10 Scientific Studies That Prove Consciousness Can Alter Our Physical World
Nikola Tesla said it best, “the day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence. To understand the true nature of the universe, one must think it terms of energy, frequency and vibration.” Swami Vivekananda was Tesla’s mentor, an Indian Hindu monk and chief disciple of the 19th century saint Ramakrishna. Science works best when in harmony with nature. If we put these two together, we can discover great technologies that can only come about when the consciousness of the planet is ready to embrace them, like free energy. I want to make it clear that my intention of presenting this information is to demonstrate that thoughts, intentions, prayer and other units of consciousness can directly influence our physical material world. Sending thoughts of love, healing intent, prayer, good intention, and more can have a powerful influence on what you are directing those feelings towards. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Related:  Spirituality / Theology / OccultismConsciousness

Akashic records Background[edit] Akasha is a Sanskrit word meaning "sky", "space" or "aether", and it entered the language of theosophy through H. P. Blavatsky, who characterized it as a sort of life force; she also referred to "indestructible tablets of the astral light" recording both the past and future of human thought and action, but she did not explicitly identify these as "akashic" in nature.[1] The notion of an akashic record is attributed to Alfred Percy Sinnett, who, in his book Esoteric Buddhism (1884), wrote of a Buddhist belief in "a permanency of records in the Akasa" and "the potential capacity of man to read the same."[2][1] By C. Accounts of purported akashic access[edit] Readings of the akashic record were central to theosophist writings, but also appear in writings of other related figures. Alice A. "The akashic record is like an immense photographic film, registering all the desires and earth experiences of our planet. Levi H. See also[edit] References[edit]

Reality Not to be confused with Realty. Philosophers, mathematicians, and other ancient and modern thinkers, such as Aristotle, Plato, Frege, Wittgenstein, and Russell, have made a distinction between thought corresponding to reality, coherent abstractions (thoughts of things that are imaginable but not real), and that which cannot even be rationally thought. By contrast existence is often restricted solely to that which has physical existence or has a direct basis in it in the way that thoughts do in the brain. Reality is often contrasted with what is imaginary, delusional, (only) in the mind, dreams, what is false, what is fictional, or what is abstract. At the same time, what is abstract plays a role both in everyday life and in academic research. For instance, causality, virtue, life, and distributive justice are abstract concepts that can be difficult to define, but they are only rarely equated with pure delusions. The truth refers to what is real, while falsity refers to what is not. Being

Cartilage, made to order: Living human cartilage grown on lab chip In a significant step toward reducing the heavy toll of osteoarthritis around the world, scientists have created the first example of living human cartilage grown on a laboratory chip. The researchers ultimately aim to use their innovative 3-D printing approach to create replacement cartilage for patients with osteoarthritis or soldiers with battlefield injuries. "Osteoarthritis has a severe impact on quality of life, and there is an urgent need to understand the origin of the disease and develop effective treatments" said Rocky Tuan, Ph.D., director of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, member of the American Association of Anatomists and the study's senior investigator. Osteoarthritis is marked by a gradual disintegration of cartilage, a flexible tissue that provides padding where bones come together in a joint. Although some treatments can help relieve arthritis symptoms, there is no cure.

Strange Artefacts: Crystal Skulls Researchers found that the skull had been carved against the natural axis of the crystal. Modern crystal sculptors always take into account the axis, or orientation of the crystal's molecular symmetry, because if they carve "against the grain," the piece is bound to shatter -- even with the use of lasers and other high-tech cutting methods. To compound the strangeness, HP could find no microscopic scratches on the crystal which would indicate it had been carved with metal instruments. Dorland's best hypothesis for the skull's construction is that it was roughly hewn out with diamonds, and then the detail work was meticulously done with a gentle solution of silicon sand and water. Under these circumstances, experts believe that successfully crafting a shape as complex as the Mitchell-Hedges skull is impossible; as one HP researcher is said to have remarked, "The damned thing simply shouldn't be." The British Crystal Skull and the Paris Crystal Skull The British Crystal Skull. ET Skull

Consensus reality Consensus reality[1][2] is that which is generally agreed to be reality, based on a consensus view. The difficulty with the question stems from the concern that human beings do not in fact fully understand or agree upon the nature of knowledge or ontology, and therefore it is not possible to be certain beyond doubt what is real.[3][4] Accordingly, this line of logic concludes, we cannot in fact be sure beyond doubt about the nature of reality. We can, however, seek to obtain some form of consensus, with others, of what is real. We can use this consensus as a pragmatic guide, either on the assumption that it seems to approximate some kind of valid reality, or simply because it is more "practical" than perceived alternatives. Throughout history this has also raised a social question: "What shall we make of those who do not agree with consensus realities of others, or of the society they live in?" General discussion[edit] Consensus reality in science and philosophy[edit] Objectivists[edit]

DNA: Past to the Present In honor of "DNA Day" on April 25, GEN created this timeline to illustrate how our knowledge of the hereditary molecule is based on the work of intellectual giants, specifically an Austrian monk and a long line of curious and insightful scientists. Their experiments, coupled to an amazing sense of intuition, revolutionized life science research forever and and served as the template for the founding of the biotechnology industry. (If you're having trouble viewing the video below, click here.) Want more on DNA? Check our these GEN articles on the topic: DNA @ 60: Where Are We Headed from Here? Sacred Geometry: Flower of Life Sacred Geometry - Flower of Life By Andrew Monkman I believe the complete ancient flower of life is an inter-dimensional tool, a portal, a stargate, a window into what some call the inter space plains. The original flower of life (found on several pillars within "the Osireion" at abydos in Egypt) is incomplete, because it is only the first layer of three (pic1+2). 1. The Temple of Osiris at Abydos, Egypt. 2. The complete flower has the other two layers added, making it three dimensional (pic3). 3. What appears is a reptilian entity. Flower of Life - Beijing, China The second being is the Chinese dragon ( the fu dog). You may know that the complete flower contains the kabbalah`s tree of life, the fruit, the egg and the seed of life (pic. 4 & 5). 4. 5. The complete flower also contains the three dimensional metatron cube (pic6), which holds all the Platonic solids (pic7). 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. I was born and bred and now live back in Kirkwall. 12. 13. 14. 15. Update - June 2011 Dance of the Planets

There are seven types of near-death experiences, according to research Depending on your beliefs, the experience of death hovers over our lives like an unknowable but inevitable void. Aside from the well-cited 'bright-light at the end of the tunnel' cliché, we have no idea what it's going to look or feel like, but we know for sure that we're all eventually going to find out. One person who has a better idea than most is Sam Parnia, the director of resuscitation research at Stony Brook University School of Medicine in the US, who has conducted the largest study to date on resuscitated patients in an attempt to try to unravel the mental and cognitive experience of dying. As part of his research, he's interviewed more than 100 people who've been brought back to life after suffering from a fatal cardiac arrest, and found that nearly half of them have some memory, ranging from terrifying to blissful, of their death. FearSeeing animals or plantsBright lightViolence and persecutionDeja-vuSeeing familyRecalling events post-cardiac arrest "I was terrified.

Children with strange gene mutation found to possess 'super' immunity to viruses (NaturalNews) Some interesting discoveries in the area of gene encoding are generating fresh buzz within the scientific community. A new study recently published in The New England Journal of Medicine has identified a rare type of gene mutation in some humans that appears to confer "super" immunity to viruses, a finding that some scientists hope will lead to breakthroughs in the fight against infectious diseases. Two children with a rare defect in the gene MOGS, which encodes mannosyl-oligosaccharide glucosidase, were the subjects behind this new discovery. The two individuals, both of whom were born with an array of other health problems ranging from cerebral atrophy and dysmorphic facial features to hypoplastic genitalia, were carefully evaluated for frequency of fevers, suspected and confirmed number of infections, and history of antibiotic use. This extraordinary resistance against viral infections comes with a price, though. Sources for this article include:

"A dog will recognise its master in any clothes, so... New research suggests that our Universe could be a giant hologram As far as mind-melting ideas go, the 'hologram principle' is right up there. It predicts that, mathematically, the Universe requires just two dimensions, and only looks three dimensional to us because it acts like a giant hologram. It sounds pretty crazy, but over the past two decades, the principle has steadily been gathering steam, and now new results suggest that this principle holds true for flat spaces like our Universe, and could soon be tested. This would mean that everything we see in our comfortable, three-dimensional world is just the image of two-dimensional processes, overlaid onto a huge cosmic horizon. But let's back things up a little bit, because while this all sounds a little too whacky, the science actually holds up. The holographic principle was first proposed by physicist Leonard Susskind in the 1990s, and Jamie Lendino over at Extreme Tech does a great job of explaining the basic idea: Source: Extreme Tech

Water Powered Car Unveiled: Yes It’s Real Everyday the world becomes aware of technologies that have the potential to halt the unnecessary damage we continue to create using fossil fuels. We’ve been talking about it for years, transitioning our way of life to be more harmonious with the planet and its natural systems. I’m not talking about solar or wind power (although great), I’m talking about clean and green technology that render fossil fuel burning technologies inferior and obsolete. One of these “new” technologies is a water fuelled car, and it has been unveiled on a number of occasions. It’s an automobile that derives its energy directly from water, and water alone. It is not hard to see why it’s not available to the masses. A Japanese company called Genepax unveiled their water powered car in 2008 in Osaka, Japan(1). This isn’t a conspiracy! Click HERE to view the water energy system patent. So what happened to Genepax? Here is another brief clip of Stan as he demonstrates his technology. Sources

Tarot Visconti-Sforza tarot deck. The Devil card is a 20th-century replacement for the card missing from the original 15th-century deck. François Rabelais gives tarau as the name of one of the games played by Gargantua in his Gargantua and Pantagruel;[2] this is likely the earliest attestation of the French form of the name.[citation needed] Tarot cards are used throughout much of Europe to play card games. In English-speaking countries, where these games are largely unplayed, tarot cards are now used primarily for divinatory purposes.[1] Occultists call the trump cards and the Fool "the major arcana" while the ten pip and four court cards in each suit are called minor arcana. Etymology[edit] History[edit] Early decks[edit] Le Bateleur: The Juggler from the Jean Dodal Tarot of Marseilles. Tarot, tarock and tarocchi games[edit] Divinatory, esoteric, and occult tarot[edit] Each card possesses a pictogram and title that represents a specific concept. Varieties[edit] French suited tarots[edit]

Google's AI bot thinks the purpose of life is 'to live forever' This week, Google released a research paper chronicling one of its latest forays into artificial intelligence. Researchers at the company programmed an advanced type of ‘chatbot’ that learns how to respond in conversations based on examples from a training set of dialogue. And the bot doesn’t just answer by spitting out canned answers in response to certain words; it can form new answers from new questions. This means Google’s researchers could get a little creative with it, and they certainly did - they asked the bot everything from boring IT questions to the meaning of life. The responses were alternately impressive, amusing, and unnerving. Here are some of the most poetic interactions from the paper (sic): Human: What is the purpose of life? Machine: To serve the greater good. Human: What is the purpose of living? Machine: To live forever. Human: Where are you now? Machine: I’m in the middle of nowhere. Human: What is the purpose of dying? Machine: To have a life. Machine: I don’t know.

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