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Edward Snowden: Here's how we take back the Internet

Edward Snowden: Here's how we take back the Internet
Edward Snowden: Here's how we take back the Internet Appearing by telepresence robot, Edward Snowden speaks at TED2014 about surveillance and Internet freedom. The right to data privacy, he suggests, is not a partisan issue, but requires a fundamental rethink of the role of the internet in our lives — and the laws that protect it. "Your rights matter,” he says, "because you never know when you're going to need them." Chris Anderson interviews, with special guest Tim Berners-Lee. This talk was presented at an official TED conference, and was featured by our editors on the home page.

http://www.ted.com/talks/edward_snowden_here_s_how_we_take_back_the_internet

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Snowden: UK government now leaking documents about itself (Updated below) The Independent this morning published an article - which it repeatedly claims comes from "documents obtained from the NSA by Edward Snowden" - disclosing that "Britain runs a secret internet-monitoring station in the Middle East to intercept and process vast quantities of emails, telephone calls and web traffic on behalf of Western intelligence agencies." This is the first time the Independent has published any revelations purportedly from the NSA documents, and it's the type of disclosure which journalists working directly with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden have thus far avoided. Snowden’s Secure Email Service UPDATE: On Tuesday, August 13, Ladar Levison made his first public appearance since he announced the shut down of Lavabit. In a 20-minute interview with Democracy Now!'s Amy Goodman and Aaron Maté, Levison explained more of his philosophy in creating the secure email service in the wake of the birth of the Patriot Act, but stopped himself (and was stopped by his lawyer, Jesse Binnall) from elaborating on the specific laws that limited him from sharing details about the governmental request he received.

After Edward Snowden's revelations, why trust US cloud providers? 'It's an ill bird," runs the adage, "that fouls its own nest." Cue the US National Security Agency (NSA), which, we now know, has been busily doing this for quite a while. As the Edward Snowden revelations tumbled out, the scale of the fouling slowly began to dawn on us. Outside of the United States, for example, people suddenly began to have doubts about the wisdom of entrusting their confidential data to cloud services operated by American companies on American soil. As Neelie Kroes, European Commission vice president responsible for digital affairs, put it in a speech on 4 July: "If businesses or governments think they might be spied on, they will have less reason to trust the cloud and it will be cloud providers who ultimately miss out. Why would you pay someone else to hold your commercial or other secrets, if you suspect or know they are being shared against your wishes?

Edward Snowden's not the story. The fate of the internet is Repeat after me: Edward Snowden is not the story. The story is what he has revealed about the hidden wiring of our networked world. This insight seems to have escaped most of the world's mainstream media, for reasons that escape me but would not have surprised Evelyn Waugh, whose contempt for journalists was one of his few endearing characteristics. The obvious explanations are: incorrigible ignorance; the imperative to personalise stories; or gullibility in swallowing US government spin, which brands Snowden as a spy rather than a whistleblower.

Snowden 2.0: New Active Duty NSA Whistleblower? Perhaps one of the most striking and revelatory aspects about the latest NSA surveillance news story, this one published Sunday by The Bild am Sonntag newspaper in Germany, was that it was not based on leaked documents from the now famous NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. What the paper reported, based on information provided by a “high-ranking NSA employee in Germany,” was that the U.S. spy agency—after being outed for spying on German ChancellorAngela Merkel—responded to an order to refrain from spying directly on Merkel’s phone by intensifying its monitoring of other high-level officals her government. “We have had the order not to miss out on any information now that we are no longer able tomonitor the chancellor’s communication directly,” the source told the newspaper. And Seth Millstein, writing at the Bustle, explains why the importance of the Bild am Sonntagreporting is two-fold:

U.S. officials 'personally believe' Russian spies helped Snowden A U.S. Congressmen revealed to NBC Sunday that an investigation is underway to determine whether Edward Snowden was aided by Russia in the theft of top-secret U.S. National Security Agency files. What Edward Snowden Leaked Was Nothing Compared to What He Didn’t A copy of the FISA court order requiring Verizon to give the NSA information on the telephone calls of Verizon customers. (AP Photo) This article originally appeared at TomDispatch.com.

Edward Snowden’s Brave Integrity Exclusive: President Obama says he welcomes the debate on post-9/11 surveillance of Americans and the world, but that debate was only made meaningful by the disclosures of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, who was then indicted and sought asylum in Russia, where he just met with some ex-U.S. intelligence officials, including Ray McGovern. By Ray McGovern I’ve had a couple of days to reflect after arriving back from Moscow where my whistleblower colleagues Coleen Rowley, Jesselyn Radack, Tom Drake and I formally presented former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden with the annual Sam Adams Associates award for integrity in intelligence. The thought that companioned me the entire time was the constant admonition of my Irish grandmother: “Show me your company, and I’ll tell you who you are!” I cannot remember ever feeling so honored as I did by the company I kept over the past week.

Tails: the operating system that blew open the NSA When NSA whistle-blower Edward Snowden first emailed Glenn Greenwald, he insisted on using email encryption software called PGP for all communications. But this month, we learned that Snowden used another technology to keep his communications out of the NSA's prying eyes. It's called Tails. And naturally, nobody knows exactly who created it. Pourquoi Edward Snowden a utilisé Tails Linux pour organiser sa fuite 01net le 16/04/14 à 18h15 Outre sa messagerie chiffrée avec PGP, Edward Snowden utilisait également un autre outil informatique pour assurer la confidentialité de ses communications: le système d’exploitation Tails Linux. Comme le relate le livre « Der NSA-Komplex », qui vient d’être publié par deux journalistes du magazine Spiegel, le lanceur d’alerte a d’abord tenté d’entrer en contact avec Glenn Greenwald avec PGP, mais sans succès. A cette époque, le journaliste ne connaît rien à ces techniques de chiffrement. Il ne répond pas.

Edward Snowden In 2013, Snowden was hired by an NSA contractor, Booz Allen Hamilton, after previous employment with Dell and the CIA.[4] On May 20, 2013, Snowden flew to Hong Kong after leaving his job at an NSA facility in Hawaii and in early June he revealed thousands of classified NSA documents to journalists Glenn Greenwald, Laura Poitras and Ewen MacAskill. Snowden came to international attention after stories based on the material appeared in The Guardian and The Washington Post. Further disclosures were made by other newspapers including Der Spiegel and The New York Times. On June 21, 2013, the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed charges against Snowden of two counts of violating the Espionage Act of 1917 and theft of government property.[5] On June 23, he flew to Moscow, Russia, where he remained for over a month. Russian authorities granted him one-year asylum, which was later extended to three years.

Statement by Julian Assange after One Year in Ecuadorian Embassy (on 2013-06-22) It has now been a year since I entered this embassy and sought refuge from persecution. As a result of that decision, I have been able to work in relative safety from a US espionage investigation. But today, Edward Snowden’s ordeal is just beginning. Julian Assange Reveals "Google's Covert Role In Foaming Uprisings" Authored by Julian Assange, originally posted at The Stringer, Google and the NSA: Who’s holding the ‘shit-bag’ now? It has been revealed today, thanks to Edward Snowden, that Google and other US tech companies received millions of dollars from the NSA for their compliance with the PRISM mass surveillance system.

תומכת לחלוטין במה שהוא אומר! אם אני רוצה שיעקבו אחריי, זה יהיה רק למטרות שאני מאשרת. אין לאף אחד שום סיבה לקבל עליי מידע מיותר, בטח שלא מבלי שהסכמתי לכך. by kwen Jun 11

Mr. Snowden says: "Don't give up your rights! Protect yourself & crypt any page you write or keep on the web...! Who knows how an NSA agent, in a few years from now, might interpret your emails, messages, notes or researches on your PC web?" HE IS RIGHT!! Hold your breath, he promised that there are more "releases" to come!! Can't wait for it! by topoletta Mar 20

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