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David Allen: Getting Things Done

David Allen: Getting Things Done

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo7vUdKTlhk

Related:  Presentations ACEO/BAGTD

Getting Things Done The GTD method rests on the idea of moving planned tasks and projects out of the mind by recording them externally and then breaking them into actionable work items. This allows one to focus attention on taking action on tasks, instead of on recalling them. First published in 2001, a revised edition of the book was released in 2015 to reflect the changes in information technology during the preceding decade and incorporate recent scientific research supporting the system's claims regarding how the mind functions.[2]

as a low effort GTD tool « Licorize' Blog Licorize is not associated in any form with Mr. David Allen or its company, When referring to the GTD book, we will refer to Piatkus edition 2009. Here we consider Licorize as a tool which can help in using the Getting Things Done methodology. We also briefly introduce the methodology. Getting Things Done, also abbreviated as GTD, is a popular time management productivity method created by David Allen. It is presented in this book, though I find Mr.

5 Unexpected Ways To Get More Done I wrote a post recently about ways that you can work smarter, not harder. As I worked through the list of techniques I’d collected, the post became so long that I had to split it in half. Here are even more suggestions to help you make your day more productive without putting in extra hours.

untitled PHREADZ is a 'Social Multimedia Network' enabling threaded conversations on any topic using posts from a plethora of places from desktops, mobiles or via email. As well as supporting the ability to record and post video using a webcam or mobile phone, a Phreadz post or reply can be content simply shared from a wide variety of popular content networks: Posts and conversations can be easily shared at the click of a button to your blogs or other social media networks: Phreadz has topic or brand-specific 'channels' which can be fully customised for events, causes, clubs or companies.

Google Calendar Google Calendar is a free time-management web application offered by Google. It became available on April 13, 2006, and exited the beta stage in July 2009. Users are required to have a Google Account in order to use the software. Features[edit] Interface[edit] Guest Post: How To Hack Your Environment For Maximum Learning This guest post was written by Andrianes Pinantoan. Andrianes is currently studying a TAFE course to be a freelance writer. When not working, he can be found with a camera in hand. The Science of Productivity. “It is not enough to be busy… The question is: what are we busy about?” ~ Henry David Thoreau Busy is already a given in our twenty-first century stampede. Busyness has multiplied by all kinds of parallel realities.

Calendaring software Calendaring software is software that minimally provides users with an electronic version of a calendar. Additionally, the software may provide an appointment book, address book, and/or contact list. These tools are an extension of many of the features provided by time management software such as desk accessory packages and computer office automation systems. Calendaring is a standard feature of many PDAs, EDAs, and smartphones. The software may be a local package designed for individual use (e.g. Lightning extension for Mozilla Thunderbird, Microsoft Outlook without Exchange Server, or Windows Calendar) or may be a networked package that allows for the sharing of information between users (e.g.

7 Secrets of the Super Organized A few years ago, my life was a mess. So was my house, my desk, my mind. Then I learned, one by one, a few habits that got me completely organized. Am I perfect? Of course not, and I don’t aim to be. But I know where everything is, I know what I need to do today, I don’t forget things most of the time, and my house is uncluttered and relatively clean (well, as clean as you can get when you have toddlers and big kids running around). 9 Powerful Habits for Getting Important Things Done We all know that sinking feeling. A deadline is drawing closer and you haven't even started yet. You begin to panic and a dull nausea sets in. There is nothing worse than having two hours remaining to complete a project that you know will take more like five. You sit there saying to yourself, "Why didn't I get this started yesterday?"

Etherpad Etherpad (previously known as EtherPad)[1][2] is a web-based collaborative real-time editor, allowing authors to simultaneously edit a text document, and see all of the participants' edits in real-time, with the ability to display each author's text in their own color. There is also a chat box in the sidebar to allow meta communication. First launched in November 2008, the software was acquired by Google in December 2009 and released as open source later that month. Several services now use the Etherpad software, including PiratePad, Telecomix Pad, Framapad, Mozilla Pad (MoPad), PrimaryPad, QikPad, and TitanPad. Further development is coordinated by the Etherpad Foundation. Getting started with "Getting Things Done" This article was originally posted during the first week of 43 Folders' existence, and, pound for pound, it remains our most popular page on the site. Please be sure to also visit related pages, browse our GTD topic area, plus, of course you can search on GTD across our family of sites. I’ll be talking a lot here in coming weeks about Getting Things Done, a book by David Allen whose apt subtitle is “The Art of Stress-Free Productivity.” You’ve probably heard about it around the Global Interweb or have been buttonholed by somebody in your office who swears by GTD. (It probably takes a backseat only to the Atkins Diet in terms of the number of enthusiastic evangelists: sorry about that.)

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