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David Allen: Getting Things Done

David Allen: Getting Things Done

Getting Things Done The GTD method rests on the idea of moving planned tasks and projects out of the mind by recording them externally and then breaking them into actionable work items. This allows attention to be focused on taking action on tasks, instead of recalling them.[2] First published in 2001, a revised edition of the book was released in 2015 to reflect the changes in information technology during the preceding decade. Themes[edit] Allen first demonstrates stress reduction from the method with the following exercise, centered on a task that has an unclear outcome or whose next action is not defined. He claims stress can be reduced and productivity increased by putting reminders about everything you are not working on into a trusted system external to your mind. Workflow[edit] Logic tree diagram illustrating the second and third steps (process/clarify and organize) of the five-step Getting Things Done workflow. Next, reflection (termed planning in the first edition) occurs. Implementation[edit]

Physician Medical Wiki - Ask Dr Wiki Google Calendar Google Calendar is a free time-management web application offered by Google. It became available on April 13, 2006, and exited the beta stage in July 2009. Users are required to have a Google Account in order to use the software. Features[edit] Interface[edit] Content access[edit] Events are stored online; consequently, the calendar can be viewed from any location that has Internet access. Sharing calendars[edit] Google Calendar allows multiple calendars to be created and shown in the same view. Device synchronization[edit] Google integration[edit] Google Calendar is integrated with various other Google services: Gmail, Google's webmail service. 2009 introduction[edit] On March 4, 2009, Google Calendar began offering offline support.[7] On May 13, 2009, Google Calendar began offering to-do lists,[8][9] via Google Tasks. Compatibility[edit] Consistency and reliability[edit] As in other cloud computing applications, changes to Google Calendar are immediately visible to all users. See also[edit]

Khan Academy Calendaring software Calendaring software is software that minimally provides users with an electronic version of a calendar. Additionally, the software may provide an appointment book, address book, and/or contact list. These tools are an extension of many of the features provided by time management software such as desk accessory packages and computer office automation systems. Calendaring is a standard feature of many PDAs, EDAs, and smartphones. The software may be a local package designed for individual use (e.g. Lightning extension for Mozilla Thunderbird, Microsoft Outlook without Exchange Server, or Windows Calendar) or may be a networked package that allows for the sharing of information between users (e.g. Features[edit] Calendaring software will contain one or more of the following features: Examples[edit] See also[edit] External links[edit]

nibipedia Etherpad Etherpad (previously known as EtherPad)[1][2] is a web-based collaborative real-time editor, allowing authors to simultaneously edit a text document, and see all of the participants' edits in real-time, with the ability to display each author's text in their own color. There is also a chat box in the sidebar to allow meta communication. First launched in November 2008, the software was acquired by Google in December 2009 and released as open source later that month. Several services now use the Etherpad software, including PiratePad, Telecomix Pad, Framapad, Mozilla Pad (MoPad), PrimaryPad, QikPad, and TitanPad. Further development is coordinated by the Etherpad Foundation. Features and implementation[edit] Anyone can create a new collaborative document, known as a "pad". The software auto-saves the document at regular, short intervals, but participants can permanently save specific versions (checkpoints) at any time. Launch[edit] Acquisition[edit] Open-source[edit] Etherpad Lite[edit]

AI3:::Adaptive Information ยป Mike Bergman on the semantic Web and structured Web Collaborative real-time editor A collaborative editor is a form of collaborative software application that allows several people to edit a computer file using different computers, a practice called collaborative editing. There are two types of collaborative editing: real-time and non-real-time. In real-time collaborative editing (RTCE), users can edit the same file simultaneously, whereas in Non-real-time collaborative editing, the users do not edit the same file at the same time (similar to revision control systems). Collaborative real-time editors generally permit both the above modes of editing in any given instance. History[edit] The first instance of a collaborative real-time editor was demonstrated by Douglas Engelbart in 1968, in The Mother of All Demos. Instant Update was released for Mac OS in 1991 from ON Technology.[1] Later, a version for Microsoft Windows was released as well, allowing real-time collaboration across these two operating systems. Technical challenges[edit] Recent developments[edit]

MindMeisiter Popplet Time management Time management is the act or process of planning and exercising conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase effectiveness, efficiency or productivity. It is a meta-activity with the goal to maximize the overall benefit of a set of other activities within the boundary condition of a limited amount of time. Time management may be aided by a range of skills, tools, and techniques used to manage time when accomplishing specific tasks, projects, and goals complying with a due date. Initially, time management referred to just business or work activities, but eventually the term broadened to include personal activities as well. A time management system is a designed combination of processes, tools, techniques, and methods. The major themes arising from the literature on time management include the following: Time management has been considered to be a subset of different concepts such as: Project management. Some[which?] Writers[who?]

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