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The Oracle of Bacon

The Oracle of Bacon

http://oracleofbacon.org/

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Drew Berry Drew Berry is a biomedical animator whose scientifically accurate and aesthetically rich visualizations are elucidating cellular and molecular processes for a wide range of audiences. Trained as a cell biologist as well as in light and electron microscopy, Berry brings a rigorous scientific approach to each project, immersing himself in the relevant research in structural biology, biochemistry, and genetics to ensure that the most current data are represented. In three- and four-dimensional renderings of such key biological concepts as cell death, tumor growth, and the packaging of DNA, Berry captures the details of molecular shape, scale, behavior, and spatio-temporal dynamics in striking form. His groundbreaking series of animations of the intricate biochemistry of DNA replication, translation, and transcription demonstrates these multifaceted processes in ways that enlighten both scientists and the scientifically curious.

Real Animals That You Didn't Know Existed Maned Wolf The world we live in is filled with exotic wildlife, and that means more than just lions and giraffes. There are a multitude of species that are lesser known to the general public and fascinating to learn more about. Redditor preggit decided to introduce a whole batch of these real animals that look like they've been Photoshopped. Ultimate Pirate Ship Bedroom (14 pics) "The rope bridge is connected to the top of the jail cell, built to accommodate evil doers, thieves and little sisters." Designer Steve Kuhl fulfills every boy's fantasy with this insanely cool pirate ship bedroom. The six-year-old occupant from Minnesota chose between a space ship, race car, castle, and pirate ship. Most of us would probably agree, he made an excellent decision. The main feature of the room is the incredible floating pirate ship. Kuhl used 2x12 ribs to construct the hull of the ship, covering them with layers of 1/2 inch plywood to act as the planking.

Exclusive Interview: Ultimate Pirate Ship Bedroom Designer Last week, people of all ages came into My Modern Met to marvel at a pirate ship bedroom that looked like it belonged at Disneyland. In fact, all you had to do was search Twitter to see what grown adults were saying. Miketruong honestly said, "I'm 23 and yes, I want this." Perfectly-Timed Photos of Animals About to Become Dinner Call it survival of the fittest or just being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Today we take a look at incredible photos, taken at just the right moment, of animals about to feast on other animals. They show birds, reptiles and mammals about to consume their latest meal. If anything, they'll will make you happy that humans are on top of the food chain!

2013 UCS Editorial Cartoon Contest Contestants The UCS Editorial Cartoon Contest The 2013 UCS Editorial Cartoon Contest has ended! The winner is Mark Hicks of Phoenix, AZ. The 2014 Editorial Cartoon Calendar, featuring the winning cartoon plus the 11 others featured below, can be pre-ordered now. The cartoons cover a number of topics that are critical to the role of science in policy making, including the general state of public dialogue, corporate interference in science, attacks on the scientific regulatory system, barriers to the responsible use of science in policy making, the interaction of communications and social media with science, attacks on scientists, and the defense of science.

Slime Molds Are Earth’s Smallest, Oldest Farmers - Wired Science Colonies of a bizarre microbial goo have been found practicing agriculture at a scale tinier than any seen before. Animals such as ants, snails and beetles are known to farm fungus. But the slime mold’s bacterial-farming trick takes it into a whole new realm.. “If you can pack your food source with you, it’s a serious advantage,” said molecular biologist Debra Brock of Rice University, co-author of the slime-mold study, published Jan. 19 in Nature. Dictyostelium discoideum, the best-known of a group of creatures called slime molds, spends part of its life as a single-celled amoeba feeding on bacteria that grow in decomposing leaves on forest floors. When food is short, hundreds of thousands of amoebas come together, fusing into a single entity.

Slime Mold Grows Network Just Like Tokyo Rail System - Wired Science Talented and dedicated engineers spent countless hours designing Japan’s rail system to be one of the world’s most efficient. Could have just asked a slime mold. When presented with oat flakes arranged in the pattern of Japanese cities around Tokyo, brainless, single-celled slime molds construct networks of nutrient-channeling tubes that are strikingly similar to the layout of the Japanese rail system, researchers from Japan and England report Jan. 22 in Science. A new model based on the simple rules of the slime mold’s behavior may lead to the design of more efficient, adaptable networks, the team contends.

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