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Matt Cutts: Try something new for 30 days

Matt Cutts: Try something new for 30 days
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http://www.ted.com/talks/matt_cutts_try_something_new_for_30_days

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Classroom observations: what’s the best fix for a good but not perfect measure? Imagine having someone follow you around, observing you for just a fraction of a day, to assess your capability on the job. Sounds nerve wracking. This is how many teachers are evaluated, and new research suggests that these observations are not altogether reliable. Although observations as a means of teacher assessment may be favoured over other methods such as gains in pupil standardised test score, we should be wary of relying too heavily on observations as they currently stand. A new paper out by the Brookings Institute reports that an assessment of teachers via observations is biased based on the existing ability level of the pupils in the class.

edsurge US History teacher Jennifer Hesseltine combined TED-Ed Lessons with an interactive blackboard to create a digital homework space that students love. Let’s redesign homework. When’s the last time your students got excited to do homework? The Hidden Brain: How Ocean Currents Explain Our Unconscious Social Biases by Maria Popova “Those who travel with the current will always feel they are good swimmers; those who swim against the current may never realize they are better swimmers than they imagine.” Biases often work in surreptitious ways — they sneak in through the backdoor of our conscience, our good-personhood, and our highest rational convictions, and lodge themselves between us and the world, between our imperfect humanity and our aspirational selves, between who we believe we are and how we behave. In the introduction, Vedantam contextualizes why this phenomenon isn’t new but bears greater urgency than ever: Unconscious biases have always dogged us, but multiple factors made them especially dangerous today. Globalization and technology, and the intersecting faultlines of religious extremism, economic upheaval, demographic change, and mass migration have amplified the effects of hidden biases.

5 Awesome TED Talks On How Technology Is Changing Education - Springboard Blog In the last ten years, technology has changed the way we work and communicate with others — and it’s also changed how we interact in the classroom. In fact, some educators argue that technology can improve the classroom by eliminating the need for a physical one, and allow students to learn remotely, from wherever they do their best work. While it’s still too early to know if this is the most effective way to teach, it’s important to stay-to-update on these innovations in education and see what we can learn from them. In these TED talks, students and educators share their stories of how technology has helped them learn to code, make art, connect with others, start schools, and more. Let’s Teach Kids To Code MIT professor Mitch Resnick believes in the power of teaching kids as young as kindergartners how to build programs. We hope this list was helpful for you: we’re all about learning at Springboard.

Want to Stop Mean Girls? Raise Nice Girls, Instead  Once upon a time, fourth grade was the year that young girls began to have difficulty navigating friendships. For many years, I worked in a school for kids with learning disabilities. It was always during fourth grade that previously established friendships began to hit turbulence. Tech Tip: Using Ted Talks in the classroom Students are asked more and more often to evaluate a wider range of media. I am always looking for tools that not only I can use in the classroom, but students will use effectively. I found that tool: TED Talks. My students search TED.com for talks that interest them. Their assignment is to intently watch the talk they selected and complete the Google Doc assignment I give them. It’s a simple assignment that has become quite insightful, for me and for my students.

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick How to praise kids: It’s a hot topic for many parents and educators. A lot of the conversation around it has stemmed from studies by Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford who has been researching this specific topic for many years. “My research shows that praise for intelligence or ability backfires,” said Dweck, who co-authored a seminal research paper on the effects of praise on motivation and performance. “What we’ve shown is that when you praise someone, say, ‘You’re smart at this,’ the next time they struggle, they think they’re not. TED-ED clubs give students a platform for sharing ideas The clubs are fashioning the next generation of TED speakers one big idea at a time One of Mitzi Stover’s biggest challenges as a teacher is convincing her students they have a voice. Stover teaches speech and English at North Torrance High School in a working-class area of Los Angeles where kids seldom travel or even leave the neighborhood. “Their world is very small geographically,” Stover said during a recent presentation at the CUE 2016 national conference in Palm Springs. “And teenagers are already so dismissed most of the time.” From her years of teaching, Stover knew that having students delve into their interests and personal experiences was one of the best ways to develop their passions — and in turn their public speaking.

Educational Leadership:Early Intervention at Every Age:The Perils and Promise... Carol S. Dweck I think educators commonly hold two beliefs that do just that. Why Schools Need to Bring Back Shop Class Sir Ken Robinson, Ph.D, is the author of Creative Schools, The Element, Finding Your Element and Out of Our Minds. The Education Committee of the US Senate is currently considering the re-authorization of No Child Left Behind. Much of the original rhetoric in NCLB was about improving job readiness and employability. In a tragic irony, the focus of the last ten years has not been on improving vocational programs at all but on testing narrow academic standards.

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