background preloader

Window Farming: A Do-It-Yourself Veggie Venture

Window Farming: A Do-It-Yourself Veggie Venture
Homegrown Harvest: Britta Riley and Rebecca Bray tend to Brooklyn's first window farm. This form of urban agriculture is catching on in cities around the world, as downtown farmers go online to share techniques for growing greens indoors. Julia Makarova hide caption itoggle caption Julia Makarova If you have a green thumb, a window and a serious Do-It-Yourself ethic, you too, can be a farmer ... even in your downtown apartment building. Spring is here, and for urban dwellers with no access to soil, hydroponic gardening is a way to grow fresh veggies indoors. "Window farming," as it is called, is catching on in New York City and beyond. A simple window farm system is a column of upside down water bottles, with plants growing out of holes cut into the sides. itoggle caption WindowFarms A simple window farm system is a column of upside down water bottles, with plants growing out of holes cut into the sides. WindowFarms "I grew up on a ranch in Texas," Riley says.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125504307

Related:  Window Farmingwindow farmGardenmoes

Window Farms It all started when Britta Riley decided to build a mini-garden in a Brooklyn window, creating a low-maintenance and self-sufficient alternative to consuming. We’ve been fans of Window Farm‘s edible gardens for long while, and just in time for the holiday season the team has evolved their fantastic gardening systems to create a brand new stand-up version of their original microfarms. These mini-gardens can hang in columns or stand on the sill, allowing you to grow fresh vegetables, herbs, and leafy treats in practically any space. Britta Riley‘s vertical hydroponic Window Farm systems are a boon for space-starved urban dwellers looking to start their own garden. In their latest form the gardens are made from environmentally-friendly plastic and wire.

Window Farms Org 1) Translated by: Windowfarms Core Team. Welcome to the Instructions for MAMA! The Windowfarms Version 3.0 Modular Airlift Multicolumn Array (MAMA). Please make sure you have registered on our.windowfarms.org, including having accepted the terms of service for participating in this open design community project. Registering will pass on to you a royalty-free license for you to use this community developed patent pending design for non-commercial purposes. Learn to Grow Plants and Food With Beginner Garden Projects @Scott Gardner: Head over to Cornell university's web site for everything you need to know about specific plants. They'll give you the soil requirements, optimum amounts of light, soil temperatures, watering schedule etc for most of your basic garden plants. Next, review your soil condition. Of primary concern are temperature, and pH.

16 Foods That’ll Re-Grow from Kitchen Scraps By Andy Whiteley Co- Founder of Wake Up World Looking for a healthy way to get more from your garden? Like to know your food is free of the pesticides and other nasties that are often sprayed on commercial crops? Window Farms A Windowfarm is a vertical, indoor garden kit that allows for year-round growing in almost any window. It lets plants use natural window light, the climate control of your living space, and organic “liquid soil.” In the hydroponic system, nutrient-spiked water is pumped up from a reservoir at the base of the system and trickles down from bottle to bottle, bathing the roots along the way. Water and nutrients that are not absorbed collect in the reservoir and will be pumped through again at the next interval.

Windowfarms let you garden - appropriately enough - in your windows Whereas the majority of vertical farming concepts and projects featured in Gizmag over the years have either been huge dedicated structures or add-ons to existing buildings, the Windowfarms system downsizes and personalizes veggie growing by placing an indoor farm in the window. The original plastic-bottle-based, do-it-yourself hydroponics system design has been available for a while now but the developers are getting ready to make a new, improved kit version available. View all The Windowfarms system was first developed by Britta Riley after reading an article in the New York Times about growing your own food. Living in a Brooklyn apartment building somewhat limited the amount of space on offer to the urban farmer so Riley began working with Rebecca Bray on a vertical hydroponics home farm system capable of year-round growing in almost any window. "Windowfarms let us do a lot with the little amount of space we have," says Riley.

Gardening Tips ‘n Ideas A DIY Vertical Garden Example Ever since coming across Patrick Blanc’s vertical garden I’ve been interested to observe how this technology might transform the home gardening scene. I mean, it’s only a matter of time before we begin running out room for gardens to grow on a horizontal plane. Yet vertical – that’s another dimension altogether. For most home gardeners the concept isn’t a new one. An Underground WWII Bomb Shelter in London Has Been Converted Into the World’s Largest Subterranean Hydroponic Farm Over 100 feet below the bustling streets of London is a cavernous, abandoned space. Originally built to serve as a bomb shelter during World War II, it was designed to house and protect the lives of nearly 8,000 people. The space remained abandoned for close to 70 years until entrepreneurs Richard Ballard and Steven Dring decided to turn it into the world’s first subterranean farm called Growing Underground. And surprisingly, where the sun doesn’t shine turns out to be an ideal setting for a garden. The vertically stacked hydroponic beds are best for growing small, leafy greens that have a short growth cycle like watercress, Thai basil and Japanese mizuna. And with a state-of-the-art computer controlling temperature, lighting and nutrients the subterranean farm can deliver consistent produce without sunlight (or pesticides!)

Spindow? Rotating Two-Face Window Plus Built-In Planter None of the ideas behind this is itself new, but the combination is a neat realization of multiple functions in one object for everyday home fenestration. First, yes, these are easier to clean than simple American-style, up-or-side-sliding windows, but the Europeans solved that problem some time ago with their dual-mode designs (which open at an angle for breezes while maintaining security, or rotate inward like doors depending on how you turn the handle). More interesting, perhaps, is the addition of a detachable planter that can take full advantage of being swung back indoors during adverse weather conditions (be it too much rain, or heat, or cold) then spun back outside just as easily.

Related: