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News: Rain Forest

News: Rain Forest
For centuries, humans have relied on rain forests for a variety of products. Foods such as tomatoes, peppers, corn, rice, coconuts, bananas, coffee, cocoa, tapioca, beans, and sweet potatoes all originally came from the rain forest. Many civilizations have exploited the timber in rain forests and cleared the land for farms. Some preliterate tribes have actually lived in the rain forests for thousands of years. Today people rely on tropical rain forests for a variety of everyday products: paper (7 percent of all paper pulp comes from the rain forest); rubber (used in tires and other products); wax (used in plastics); mahogany and teak (used in wood products such as furniture); and many other items. Destructive Activities Unfortunately, human activities have taken a toll on the rain forest. Farming. Cattle ranching also poses a danger to rain forests. Logging. Other activities. Destruction Aftermath Soil and erosion. Flora and fauna. Climate. Copyright © 2002 Grolier Incorporated.

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About Ecological Footprint Right now we consume the equivalent of 1.5 planets' worth of natural resources every year! Did you know that if everyone on the planet lived like the average American, we would need 5 Earths to sustain our lifestyle? Where does that number come from? By determining how many hectares of land humans need to support their lifestyle and comparing it to the amount of arable land found on the planet, scientists are able to measure the impact of human demand on the planet’s eco systems, which is called our ecological footprint.

Rain Forest Threats, Rain Forest Species More than half of Earth’s rain forests have already been lost forever to the insatiable human demand for wood and arable land. Rain forests that once grew over 14 percent of the land on Earth now cover only about 6 percent. And if current deforestation rates continue, these critical habitats could disappear from the planet completely within the next hundred years. The reasons for plundering rain forests are mainly economic. Wealthy nations drive demand for tropical timber, and cash-strapped governments often grant logging concessions at a fraction of the land’s true value. Serious game Click on the image to start the game Scenario For more than a century people have been using and depleting energy resources carefree, as if they were endless. In 2020 the world could find itself in a deadlock. The player has the power to go back in time and to rewrite history. The player’s objective: to reduce the consumption of energy, increase energy efficiency and choose the best renewable energies.

Rain Forest In Brazil, which houses 30 percent of the remaining tropical rain forest on Earth, more than 50,000 square miles of rain forest were lost to deforestation between 2000 and 2005. Biologists worry about the long-term consequences. Drought may be one. Some rain forests, including the Amazon, began experiencing drought in the 1990s, possibly due to deforestation and global warming. Efforts to discourage deforestation, mainly through sustainable-logging initiatives, are underway on a very limited basis but have had a negligible impact so far. Your meat addiction is destroying the planet “Jesus,” Molly said, her own plate empty, “gimme that. You know what this costs?” She took his plate. “They gotta raise a whole animal for years and then they kill it. This isn’t vat stuff.” She forked a mouthful up and chewed.” – William Gibson, Neuromancer (1984)

Rainforest Coloring Pages and Activities for Kids Color in your favorite rainforest birds, mammals, reptiles and plants in our coloring book, or teach yourself about the rainforest with our fun experiments, crafts, and quizzes. Coloring Pages: Amphibians Julia Roberts plays Mother Earth and Harrison Ford stars as the Ocean as Hollywood A-list 'speaks out for nature' Ecosystem services. You’ve nodded off already, haven’t you? But wake up! Here are some Hollywood A-listers making a decent attempt to move beyond the obscure jargon and reveal the existential nature of what the Earth provides for humanity. The Nature is Speaking initiative is organised by Conservation International with the tag-line: “Nature doesn’t need people. People need nature.”

This Drone Startup Has An Ambitious (Crazy) Plan To Plant 1 Billion Trees A Year The world burns or cuts down about 26 billion trees a year. It replants about 15 billion. You can see the shortfall. Bagheera Bagheera (Hindi: बघीरा) is a black panther (black Indian leopard) who is a fictional character in Rudyard Kipling's Mowgli stories in The Jungle Book (coll. 1894) and The Second Jungle Book (coll. 1895). The word bāgh (बाघ) means "tiger" in Hindi. Everybody knew Bagheera, and nobody dared to cross his path; for he was as cunning as Tabaqui, as bold as the wild buffalo, and as reckless as the wounded elephant. But he had a voice as soft as wild honey dripping from a tree, and a skin softer than down. Character history[edit] Born in captivity in the menagerie of the Rajah of Oodeypore, India, Bagheera begins to plan for his freedom after his mother dies.

Endangered Animals List Animal endangerment is a big environmental issue, and the number of endangered animals is constantly on the rise. See the IUCN definitions of different types of animal endangerment here. Below is a list of some of the most popular endangered animals, according to the IUCN classification. Critically Endangered Animals Sumatran Orangutan (Indonesia) Sumatran Tiger (Indonesia) Lear’s Macaw (Brazil) Brown Spider Monkey (Colombia, Venezuela) Rancho Grande Harlequin Frog (Venezuela) Panamanian Golden Frog (Panama) Pygmy Three-toed Sloth (Panama) Yellow-crested Cockatoo (Indonesia) Golden-bellied Capuchin (Brazil) Elegant Frog (Australia) Orinoco Crocodile (Colombia, Venezuela) Mountain Gorilla (Rwanda, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo) Golden Mantella (Madagascar) Eastern Red Colobus (Kenya) Javan Rhinoceros (Indonesia, Vietnam)

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