background preloader

Technology and Teaching: Finding a Balance

Technology and Teaching: Finding a Balance
There is no doubt that finding the time to integrate technology is an overwhelming task for anyone. Throughout the course of a day, teachers find themselves pulled in many directions. However, technology is already integrated in nearly everything we do and nearly every job our students will encounter. So how do educators find an ideal balance for learning about and eventually integrating technology? It begins with a focus followed by good instructional design -- but ultimately, a healthy balance. Tomorrow's Literacy Technology is a literacy that is expected in higher education and in our economy. The contemporary job market requires us to adapt, continually learn, and apply various skill sets in many directions. It's equally important to expose students to information literacy skill sets. 3 Examples of Balanced Tech Integration Integrating technology doesn't have to consume your life as an educator. Here are some examples: Edmodo Google Sites Google Drive Opportunities, Not Apps

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/technology-and-teaching-finding-balance-andrew-marcinek

Related:  Professional Development and Professional GrowthPLN - N. WootenEducational Technology

QR Codes Can Do That? There are tons of quick and easy ways to integrate technology into your instruction -- with powerful results. I've been a fan of Quick Response (QR) codes in education for years and even wrote a book all about how they can be used to promote deeper learning in your classroom. When speaking to teachers about these black-and-white squares, it's so much fun to see the "aha" moments as we explore different ways to use scannable technology in the classroom. This list of five things that you may not know about QR codes contains some simple ideas that definitely pack a punch. These tips include strategies for differentiating instruction, distributing materials, and keeping families up to date on classroom activities. Classroom Technology Resource Guide Technology has grown over the past decade in ways that many people could not begin to picture. It has become such an integral part of home and business life that teachers need to begin to implement technology in their classrooms in order to help students be prepared for the changing job market. Technology can be used to allow students to move forward at their own pace and can help make the material more accessible to all students.

Web Tools Blog Series: Tools to Help Students Collaborate In previous blogs, we focused on web tools to collect and organize content and tools to help students create and present ideas. In this module, we focus on how to use web tools to foster collaboration. Randy Nelson (Pixar University) provides a brilliant definition of collaboration by using two principles of improv. First, accept every offer and second, make your partner look good. When teams collaborate on a project, they accept each others' ideas without judgment and "plus" them -- they ask, what can we do with this. I found this list of "principles" and think we can learn a lot more about collaboration from improv.

Journal of Educational Technology & Society 3D Virtual Worlds are being used for education and training purposes in a cross-disciplinary way. However, its widespread adoption, particularly in formal learning contexts, is far from being a reality due a broad range of technological challenges. In this reflection paper, our main goal is to argue why and how identity federation should be discussed and adopted as a solution to several barriers that educators and institutions face when using Virtual Worlds. By presenting a clear set of scenarios within different dimensions of the educational process, as classroom management, content reuse, learning analytics, accessibility, and research, we consider identity, traceability, privacy, accountability, and interoperability as main concerns in order to support our argument.

48 Ultra-Cool Summer Sites for Kids and Teachers A good majority of northern hemisphere and international schools are winding down the 2011-12 school year, and doors will be closing as the students and teachers take off on their summer adventures. Here is a list of great sites for kids and teachers to keep you happily productive and learning this summer. These are in no way in any order of personal preference or coolness. CITE Journal The CITE Journal is an online, peer-reviewed journal, established and jointly sponsored by five professional associations (AMTE, ASTE, NCSS-CUFA, CEE, and SITE). This is the only joint venture of this kind in the field of teacher education. Each professional association has sole responsibility for editorial review of articles in its discipline: Educational Technology: General (SITE) Technology and Science Education (ASTE) Technology and Mathematics Education (AMTE) Technology and Social Studies Education (NCSS-CUFA) Technology and English Education (CEE) The CITE Journal has a unique Commentary feature, which permits readers to author short responses to articles published in a commentary strand linked to the article.

PBL and Culturally Responsive Instruction Cultural responsiveness in the classroom can often be written off as something patched by a quick fix, especially in an English classroom where swapping a traditional (read: Dead White Guy) text with something written by a person from an underrepresented background can take the place of more significant cultural response. Don't get me wrong, I think that putting Zora Neale Hurston, Chang Rae Lee, and Junot Diaz into "the cannon" is an important social step for our discipline, but doing this at the expense of also having substantive structural changes in the classroom is a temptation that one has to be careful of embracing. As my colleagues at Sammamish High School and I have struggled with development and implementation of a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum across disciplines, a great number of the discussions have involved a philosophical look at the place of seven key elements within our instructional framework.

The Real Deal: Teen Characters with Autism in YA Novels Rachel Applegate, Ph.D., Chair & Associate Professor, Department of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Indianapolis Annette Goldsmith, Ph.D., Lecturer, Information School, University of Washington Marilyn Irwin, Ph.D., Emeritus Associate Professor, School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Indianapolis Applegate, Rachel, Annette Y. Goldsmith, and Marilyn Irwin. The Real Deal: Teen Characters with Autism in YA Novels.

Investing in Professional Development for Technology and Inquiry-Based Learning Tonya: I grew up here at Hartville. I moved here in third grade and I graduated here. We are kind of your traditional small town. We've got our square with the courthouse on it. You Are What You Read: Young Adult Literacy and Identity in Rural America Kim E. Becnel, College of Education, Leadership and Educational Studies Robin A. Moeller, College of Education, Leadership and Educational Studies Recruiting and Retaining Teachers: What Matters Most and What Can Government Do? Linda Darling-Hammond Charles E. Ducommun Professor, Stanford University With increased recognition that expert teachers are perhaps the most fundamental resource for improving student learning, there is growing interest in figuring out how to recruit and retain strong teachers, especially in high-need schools. Unfortunately, unlike other industrialized nations, especially those that are the highest-achieving, the United States lacks a systematic approach to recruiting, preparing, and retaining teachers. With few governmental supports for preparation or mentoring, teachers in the U.S. enter: Meanwhile, higher-achieving countries that rarely experience teacher shortages (such as Finland, Sweden, Norway, Netherlands, Germany, France, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Taiwan Singapore) have made substantial investments in teacher training and equitable teacher distribution in the last two decades.

Related: