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11 Tips For Students To Manage Their Digital Footprints -

11 Tips For Students To Manage Their Digital Footprints -
11 Tips For Students To Manage Their Digital Footprints by Justin Boyle If you’ve scratched your head over suggestions to manage your “digital footprint,” you aren’t the only one. A surprisingly large percentage of people have never even heard the phrase, let alone thought about how to manage theirs responsibly. The Definition Of A Digital Footprint Simply put, a digital footprint is the record or trail left by the things you do online. Luckily for us all, most of the major sources of personal information can be tweaked so we share only certain things with the general public. If you want to show students their digital footprint (or take a peek at your own) the personal info search engine Pipl.com is a great resource. What To Tell Your Students About Monitoring Their Digital Footprints: 11 Tips 1. Let’s talk Facebook, shall we? 2. Then delete the ones you no longer use. 3. 4. 5. You may be surprised what you find. 6. 7. 8. That said, you don’t need 12. 9. 10. 11. Conclusion Related:  Digital LiteracyBigger Ideas 2014

Cybersmart Tagged What you do online could tag you for life This captioned film contains moving images, a sound track and dialogue. A full copy of the script, including scene descriptions, is provided in a separate file titled ‘Tagged film script’. Gold — WorldMediaFestival Silver — New York Festivals Winner – ATOM Awards When a group of high-school friends post a rumour about a rival it sparks a chain reaction that leaves no one untouched. Developed by the Australian Communications and Media Authority’s Cybersmart program, Tagged is recommended for use with students aged 14 and over. Tagged is supported by lesson plans and compelling character reflection interviews. Definition Of Digital Citzenship The Definition Of Digital Citizenship by Terry Heick As more and more students interact digitally–with content, one another, and various communities–the concept of digital citizenship becomes increasingly important. Which begs the question: what is digital citizenship? Well, first citizenship, which is formally defined as “the quality of an individual’s response to membership in a community.” So digital citizenship is nearly the same thing–“the quality of a response to membership in a digital community” would be a good first crack at the definition. Revising that might more clearly articulate the differences between physical and digital communities, so a decent definition of digital citizenship then might be “Self-monitored participation that reflects conscious interdependence with all (visible and less visible) community members” Still too wordy? This makes it useful not just as a visual for teacher understanding, but for students to discuss, internalize, and apply themselves.

7 Things I Learned From Teaching With Twitter Natascha Chtena is a PhD student in Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. You can follow her on Twitter @nataschachtena Social media is like teen sex. Everyone wants to do it. No one actually knows how. When finally done, there is surprise its not better. - Avinash Kaushik Add “integration in the classroom” after social media in the above quote, and you get an observation that’s at least as biting, funny, and accurate as the original. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Those are all things that will influence how I plan my next quarter of Twitter-infused teaching.

Social Media at School: Teaching Safety on the Virtual Playground These days, social media gets a pretty bad rap. It seems like every other day there is a celebrity apology or a story about a teen who commits suicide due to cyberbullying. It's true, social media can breed some pretty awful stuff. And that awful stuff is great material for the digital citizenship unit that all of my school's incoming freshmen are expected to complete. Acceptable Use Our school is unique in Philadelphia in that it's one of the few public schools with a 1:1 program that allows students to take devices home. Let's face it -- teenagers are on social media in school and out of school, even if their parents have told them they can't be, and even if the school has rules about being on phones during school hours. In my class, we start the year with the book, lol. . .OMG by Matt Ivester. Always Learning It is through these discussions that I learn about how students use social media, what their experiences have been, and what their beliefs are.

Should you share that photo? Mimi Ito on Learning in Social Media Spaces (Big Thinkers Series) Mimi: So my question is this, why do we assume that kids' socializing and play is not a side of learning? And on the flip side, why do we assume that schools can't have a spirit of entertainment and play as part of what they're doing? Mimi: Last year I wrapped up a three-year study with a large team of researchers where we were looking at a lot of different examples of kids' new-media practice, ranging from sort of everyday hanging-out behavior on sites like Myspace and Facebook with text messaging, IM to what we were calling more "geeked-out" kinds of participation, like making YouTube videos, remixing videos, creating podcasts, engaging in fan fiction, and other forms of fan production. Mimi: I think our most important top-level finding was that there was tremendous diversity in what kids were doing online and what kids were learning online. Mimi: There really is a gap in perception and understanding between generations about the value of engagement with online activities.

4 Technologies to Help Students Find Their Voice In Your Classroom Students need a voice. By voice, I mean the ability to recognize their own beliefs, practice articulating them in a variety of forms, and then find the confidence -- and the platform -- to express them. The platforms part can go a long way toward serving the confidence part. Introverted students (who may be gifted with self-reflection) might find the openness of a social media channel like Twitter intimidating, but they might also love the idea of long-form blogging, or even communicating indirectly through the creation of mini-documentaries, podcasts or music videos. This (correctly) implies that there is no one-size-fits-all solution for students to express themselves and interact with the world. 1. This one is simple. 2. Storify and Storehouse essentially allow students to collect media bits and pieces from across the web, and to socialize them -- that is, to shape them into a unique form of expression through social media. 3. 4.

#Presentation #workshop - Your Digital Footprint Think Online Charts Builder Hohli Online Charts Builder New version: Try new version of Charts Builder, it based on new Google Charts API Load From Image URL: Chart Data can't equal to original, but very similar to it. Only for images on chart.apis.google.com Chart Type: 3D Pie charts Lines Bar charts Pie charts For Pie Charts with labels choose 1000x300 or 800x375 size Venn diagrams Scatter plots Radar charts Chart Size: 320x240 Horizontal 1000x300 800x375 600x500 320x240 Vertical 300x1000 375x800 500x600 240x320 Square 546x546 400x400 300x300 200x200 Chart Ads: Data: Should be consists only positive numbers, use minus one (-1) for missing value, separated by coma, space or semi(,; ), e.g.: 23, 432, 456, 341 For Lines (pairs): Input data as x-axis and y-axis coordinates, e.g.: x1,y1, x2,y2, x3,y3 Title: Use a pipe character (|) to force a line break in title. Background: Chart is ready you can save it as image Right click on the chart Select "Save image as" Save the image to your computer © 2011 Charts Builder. Developed by Anton Shevchuk

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