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Ancient Words of Wisdom « Deep Spirits

Ancient Words of Wisdom « Deep Spirits
Related:  BuddhismHoly Books

67 Not Out: 21 Questions Of Life Answered By The Buddha The following questions and answers are taken from the 1894 book about Buddhism called The Gospel of Buddha. This is a compilation from ancient records by Paul Carus. On a certain day when the Blessed One dwelt at Jetavana, the garden of Anathapindika, a celestial deva came to him in the shape of a Brahman whose countenance was bright and whose garments were white like snow. The deva asked questions which the Blessed One answered The deva asked:What is the sharpest sword? The Blessed One replied:The sharpest sword is a word spoken in wrath;the deadliest poison is covetousness;the fiercest fire is hatred;the darkest night is ignorance. The deva asked:What is the greatest gain? The Blessed One replied:The greatest gain is to give to others;the greatest loss is to greedily receive without gratitude;an invulnerable armor is patience;the best weapon is wisdom. The deva asked:Who is the most dangerous thief? The deva asked:What is attraction? The deva asked:What causes ruin in the world?

Septuagint The Septuagint /ˈsɛptjuːəˌdʒɪnt/, /ˈsɛptuːəˌdʒɪnt/, /ˌsɛpˈtuːədʒɪnt/, /ˈsɛptʃuːəˌdʒɪnt/, from the Latin word septuaginta (meaning seventy), is a translation of the Hebrew Bible and some related texts into Koine Greek. The title and its Roman numeral acronym LXX refer to the legendary seventy Jewish scholars who completed the translation as early as the late 2nd century BCE. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament (Ἡ μετάφρασις τῶν Ἑβδομήκοντα). This translation is quoted in the New Testament,[1] particularly in the Pauline epistles,[2] and also by the Apostolic Fathers and later Greek Church Fathers. The Septuagint should not be confused with the seven or more other Greek versions of the Old Testament, most of which did not survive except as fragments (some parts of these being known from Origen's Hexapla, a comparison of six translations in adjacent columns, now almost wholly lost). Name[edit] [7] or G. Composition[edit] Use[edit]

art of dharma. | A Buddhist Blog on Dharma, Compassion, Meditation, Yoga, Vegetarian, and more.. 1 Corinthians 13 13 Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal. 2 And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. 3 And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned,[a] but have not love, it profits me nothing. 4 Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up; 5 does not behave rudely, does not seek its own, is not provoked, thinks no evil; 6 does not rejoice in iniquity, but rejoices in the truth; 7 bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. 8 Love never fails. 11 When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child; but when I became a man, I put away childish things. 12 For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then face to face. U.S.

How to Transcend Ego in Meditation "If you practice being present in meditation,you will find even beyond the thinkingthat there is this reflexive urgeto separate yourself from this moment. It is almost like two magnetsthat repel each other with all of their strength. This is the ego. You could even define the egoas the action of separationfrom this moment. Because if you are fully presentin this moment,there is no ego. There is no senseof "me." There is still awarenessbut all inclusive awareness. There is nothing separate from it. You can experience thisat any time. Try this now. Close your eyesand let yourselffully relax into this moment. To fully immerse yourselfin what is here and now beyond the mindwithout commentary,without definitions or descriptions,without using the mind at all. To let go into this momentto where there is only attention left. If I was to try to put it into wordsI would say that you feel this momentas subtle sensation,but you go even deeper than that. There can be no mind involved,that is the tricky part. Kip"

Ahmed Hulusi Official Website - Home Page Letting Go of Attachment, from A to Zen | zen habits “Most of our troubles are due to our passionate desire for and attachment to things that we misapprehend as enduring entities.” ~Dalai Lama Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Lori Deschene of Tiny Buddha. If there’s one thing we all have in common it’s that we want to feel happy; and on the other side of that coin, we want to avoid hurting. We pin our happiness to people, circumstances, and things and hold onto them for dear life. We attach to feelings as if they define us, and ironically, not just positive ones. In trying to hold on to what’s familiar, we limit our ability to experience joy in the present. When you stop trying to grasp, own, and control the world around you, you give it the freedom to fulfill you without the power to destroy you. It’s no simple undertaking to let go of attachment—not a one-time decision, like pulling off a band-aid. The best approach is to start simple, at the beginning, and work your way to Zen. Experiencing Without Attachment Call yourself out.

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