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Teachingenglish.org

Teachingenglish.org
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How to make Shakespeare easy for English language learners Have you ever had difficulty relating Shakespeare to learners of English? Tutor and resource writer Genevieve White comes to the rescue, in time for Shakespeare Day and English Language Day today. Last year, I wrote an article extolling the joys of teaching Shakespeare to learners of English and outlining the reasons why teachers should bring the Bard into the classroom. Some of the comments I received on this post suggested that the linguistic challenges presented by sixteenth-century English are just too great to overcome. It is true that Shakespeare’s texts may present difficulties for contemporary readers, particularly those who do not have English as a first language. Make it attractive from the start Begin by piquing your learners’ interest. One of my own personal Shakespeare favourites is his famous tale of revenge, deceit and jealousy: Othello. In the past, I have introduced my learners to the story and its characters with this trailer. 1. 2. 3. So, be not infirm of purpose!

A lesson on “To Kill A Mockingbird” Title – To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee By – Mat Campione Subject – Language Arts Grade Level – Grades 8/9 Introduction: This book creates a learning environment for the grade 9 level of reading. Included in this book are a lot of racial issues and sexual issues. To teach lessons throughout the book, the teacher must be prepared to deal with the thoughts of a society that is different than what we are used to right now. In order to begin the book: Make a list of 10 vocabulary words that will be used as a guide throughout the book. Lesson 1: Create a Handout that can be used throughout the book. I do have answers to the preceding questions. Also in this lesson you can inform the students of the word PREJUDICE Write this word on the board. Lesson 2: Pass out the packets of questions and begin to explain the depth that you are looking for in the answers. Read aloud the first chapter of the book. Lesson 3: Collect the assignment from the last class meeting. Lesson 4: Lesson 5: 2. 3.

Which Shakespeare Play Should I See? An Illustrated Flowchart In just 10 DAYS I will be speaking at the Folger Shakespeare Library! In case you've missed my previous annoucements on this, here are the basic facts: WHO: Me!WHAT: Talking about my comic and live-drawing on stageWHERE: The Folger Theater, Washington D.C.WHEN: Friday, April 29, at 6:00pmWHY: Because it's going to be REALLY SUPER FUNHOW MUCH: Nothing! It's absolutely FREE! You can reserve a FREE ticket at the Folger website.

10 English jokes to make learning English fun. Laughter is the best medicine Jokes are an essential part of any language and culture and are a great way of understanding the target language through the play on words and a culture’s sense of humour. The English Language is filled with witty, clever jokes that illustrate the play on words such as homophones, double entendre and puns like this: Did you hear about the guy whose whole left side was cut off? Every evening I share a joke on my Facebook Page under the title of Evening Fun. “I’m not sure that’s what they mean by now reduce the wine” 1. 2. Source: English is Fun 3. 4. Source: The Spectator 5. 6. 7. Source: Dawn French Fan Page 8. 9. Source: Woodward English 10. For more jokes, do take a look at the English Club. If you liked this post please share it. Have a great weekend, folks. Ciao for now Shanthi

Shakespeare Fun & Games | Macmillan Readers Welcome to the Fun and Games area of Will’s World, hosted by our very own Puck – the mischievous star of A Midsummer Night’s Dream! Here, you’ll find lots of fun resources to help you liven up your lessons and get students excited about Shakespeare in 2016! Ideal for warm-ups or end of class fun. Enjoy! Learn some fascinating facts and idioms with this special Shakespeare infographic from the Macmillan Readers! Celebratory Infographic If you’re after a fun and general introduction to Shakespeare, look no further than this infographic! It features some fascinating facts and an Idioms Quiz to get students thinking and talking about the enduring, everyday relevance of Shakespeare’s language and plays. Celebrate Shakespeare Infographic Shakespeare’s Characters Infographics To accompany each of our brand-new Shakespeare for Life lesson series, we’ll be publishing a fun infographic presenting social media-style profiles of each of the key characters from each play. Romeo & Juliet infographic Quizzes

Teen articles This diary offers students and teachers a step-by-step introduction to the LearnEnglish Teens website and a more motivating and communicative alternative to course book-based homework. It can be used with students with an A2+ level of English. Writing is becoming an increasingly important skill in today’s world. Teenagers use the written word in their own language to communicate in both social and academic contexts, and many of them will need to develop good writing skills in English too. The Writing skills practice section on LearnEnglish Teens helps teenagers to improve their writing skills for their school studies and English exams. We can help our students to become better readers by developing the subskills they need to prepare for the text, decode it and interpret it. Listening can be tricky for our learners, especially if there aren’t any visual clues to help with the meaning or if there are several speakers, background noises or different accents to contend with.

William Shakespeare Resources | Macmillan Readers Welcome to Will’s World – home of all our Shakespeare 2016 celebrations! To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, we’ll be bringing you lots of brand-new resources to help you explore the enduring relevance of his plays, characters and language with your students. Be sure to sign up for our monthly emails to get all the latest Shakespeare resources – plus a FREE copy of our Hamlet eBook! lesson plans & videos fun and games competition webinars free ebook This brand-new series of lesson plans and videos is designed to help you get students excited about Shakespeare and explore the enduring relevance of his language, and plays in our everyday lives. Ideal for Teens and Intermediate level students, there’ll be a lesson plan and video to accompany each of our seven Shakespeare titles. Download resources On Wednesday 20th April, just ahead of the Bard’s big 400th anniversary, we’ll be presenting 3 FREE webinars in our ‘Shakespeare Special’! Find out more and book your free place today!

Stories for Schools: The Long Journey Home by Sophie Smiley | TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC Stories for Schools is a British Council Turkey project to provide students with high-quality English language short stories. The Long Journey Home is a short story written by Sophie Smiley, a UK teacher and writer of storybooks for children. Set in Istanbul, this is a thrilling adventure story about a football-mad boy who gets caught up with a gang of criminals. How can Mehmet’s football skills help him beat a man with a gun? Level: A2-B1 Age: 14-17 (but activities included which may appeal to younger learners) This ‘kit’ was designed by Turkish materials writers. The kit below includes activities for you to print and copy, the complete text, and teachers' notes. Copyright - please read All the materials on these pages are free for you to download and copy for educational use only.

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