background preloader

CTE - Collaborative Learning

CTE - Collaborative Learning
What is collaborative learning? What is the impact of collaborative learning or group work? What are some examples of collaborative learning activities? How can you design group work activities? How can you manage group work? How can you evaluate group work? What is collaborative learning? Collaborative learning is based on the view that knowledge is a social construct. The learner or student is the primary focus of instruction. Collaborative learning can occur peer-to-peer or in larger groups. Group work or collaborative learning can take a variety of forms, such as quick, active learning activities in class or more involved group projects that span the course of a semester. What is the impact of collaborative learning or group work? Research shows that educational experiences that are active, social, contextual, engaging, and student-owned lead to deeper learning. Development of higher-level thinking, oral communication, self-management, and leadership skills. Stump your partner

http://www.cte.cornell.edu/teaching-ideas/engaging-students/collaborative-learning.html

Related:  Flipped classroom infosDidaktikFlippat klassrum21st Century Professional Development

CTE - Active Learning Research suggests that audience attention in lectures starts to wane every 10-20 minutes. Incorporating active learning techniques once or twice during a 50-minute class (twice to or thrice for a 75-minute class) will encourage student engagement. Active learning also: Implementing any new teaching technique can be a daunting or challenging task. Some students may not accept new learning activities with complete ease. Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos The flipped classroom model generated a lot of excitement initially, but more recently some educators — even those who were initial advocates — have expressed disillusionment with the idea of assigning students to watch instructional videos at home and work on problem solving and practice in class. Biggest criticisms: watching videos of lectures wasn’t all that revolutionary, that it perpetuated bad teaching and raised questions about equal access to digital technology. Now flipped classroom may have reached equilibrium, neither loved nor hated, just another potential tool for teachers — if done well. “You never want to get stuck in a rut and keep doing the same thing over and over,” said Aaron Sams, a former high school chemistry teacher turned consultant who helped pioneer flipped classroom learning in an edWeb webinar.

Supporting the Collaborative Learning of Practical Skills with Computer-Mediated Communications Technology Supporting the Collaborative Learning of Practical Skills with Computer-Mediated Communications Technology Mark A. Edwards School of Business and Management, Brunel University Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH, United Kingdom Tel: +44 1895 274000 Fax: +44 1895 203149 mark.edwards@brunel.ac.uk The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J.

The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. They had a lot of students that regularly missed class and saw an opportunity to make sure that missing class didn’t mean missing out on the lessons. When Teachers and Administrators Collaborate Those of us in education know that systemic change requires collaboration. And when trying to implement large-scale initiatives like the Common Core State Standards that require rethinking professional learning, curriculum and instructional materials, family engagement activities, assessment and other aspects of the education system, collaboration is particularly important. But too often the rhetoric of change indicates that it is being done to teachers, not with them -- particularly change driven by politicians who know little about education and are more conscious of the political realities they face than the best interests of students.

9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Flipped Classroom | November 2013 Digital Edition 9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Early adopters share how schools can find success with teachers and students alike--even when the technology seems as topsy-turvy as the lessons. David Perdue's Charles Dickens Page - Oliver Twist Asks for More Reading Dickens Oliver Asks for More Oliver Twist - Condensed from Chapter Two Nine-year-old Oliver is a resident in the parish workhouse where the boys are "issued three meals of thin gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll on Sundays." The workhouse is run by Bumble the Beadle, Limbkins is Chairman of the Board of Guardians for the workhouse.

Apps That Rise to the Top: Tested and Approved By Teachers Michelle Luhtala/Edshelf With the thousands of educational apps vying for the attention of busy teachers, it can be hard to sift for the gold. Michelle Luhtala, a savvy librarian from New Canaan High School in Connecticut has crowd-sourced the best, most extensive list of apps voted on by educators around the country.

How Rural Schools Paid for Students’ Home Internet to Transform Learning Like many districts serving low-income populations, it was fairly easy for Piedmont City School District officials in Alabama to find funds for devices. District officials wanted to leverage technology to open up opportunities for the 1,240 students in this rural community, so they started sending devices home with kids in grades 4-12 in 2009 through a program they call mPower Piedmont. However, lack of access to the Internet after school and in kids’ homes became a major obstacle to learning with those devices.

Related: