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Some Basic Active Learning Strategies

Some Basic Active Learning Strategies
Engaging students in individual or small group activities–pairs or trios especially–is a low-risk strategy that ensures the participation of all. The sampling of basic activities below can be adapted to almost any discussion or lecture setting. Using these strategies, or variations on them, ensures that you'll hold your students' attention in class and throughout the semester. Ice Breakers Those things that get people talking quickly and personally about their goals, fears, expectations for the session before them. Ask them, for example, to consider what one thing each hopes to gain from the workshop and what one thing each hopes to offer during the workshop, then have the group get up to rove the room for five minutes gathering a sense of what others have come to gain and to offer. top Think/Pair/Share Write/Pair/Share The format for this strategy is identical to the think-pair-share, except that students process the question asked of them by writing about it rather than reflecting. top Related:  eduBrain Stuff

KnowledegeAdventure.com – Free Online Learning Games for Kids What Is Active Learning? Defining "active learning" is a bit problematic. The term means different thing to different people, while for some the very concept is redundant since it is impossible to learn anything passively. Certainly this is true, but it doesn't get us very far toward understanding active learning and how it can be applied in college classrooms. We might think of active learning as an approach to instruction in which students engage the material they study through reading, writing, talking, listening, and reflecting. Think of the difference between a jar that's filled and a lamp that's lit. Students and their learning needs are at the center of active learning. Using active learning does not mean abandoning the lecture format, but it does take class time. What follows is a description of some of the basic elements of active learning followed by guidelines for using them in your classroom. Basic Elements of Active Learning Talking and Listening Writing Reading Reflecting Keys to Success Be creative!

10 Mind Mapping Strategies For Teachers 10 Mind Mapping Strategies For Teachers by Andrea Leyden, examtime.com The adoption of Mind Maps in teaching has grown recently due to the benefits of using Mind Maps to learn and the availability of free online mind mapping software. Teachers have recognized the value of using Mind Maps to engage students, encourage creativity and, most importantly, teaching how to learn rather simply memorizing content. Mind Maps have even been integrated into emerging teaching techniques such as the Flipped Classroom and Design Thinking as outlined in the Mind Map on the right. How do teachers harness the full power of Mind Mapping? Mind Mapping Strategies for Teachers Pre-class: In-class: Teaching: Online Mind Maps can be used in class to brainstorm and generate discussions. Outside class: Collaboration: The new generation of “Digital Citizens” are highly adaptable to change and expect to use technology as part of their education. Summary Mind Map; 10 Mind Mapping Strategies For Teachers

Twelve Active Learning Strategies Example 1 Example 1 Explanation In order for students to learn effectively, they must make connections between what they already know (prior knowledge) and new content to which they're exposed. The opening of a lecture should facilitate these connections by helping students exercise their prior knowledge of the day's subject matter. The following four slides illustrate strategies which stimulate students' thinking and prepare them to learn. One useful strategy is to open the lecture with a question. Example 2 Example 2 Explanation "Think-Pair-Share" is an active learning strategy that engages students with material on an individual level, in pairs, and finally as a large group. When used at the beginning of a lecture, a Think-Pair-Share strategy can help students organize prior knowledge and brainstorm questions. Example 3 Example 3 Explanation Focused listing is a strategy in which students recall what they know about a subject by creating a list of terms or ideas related to it. Example 4

SimCityEDU | A game-based learning and assessment tool for middle school students covering the Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. www.ok.gov/sde/sites/ok.gov.sde/files/Targeting Growth.pdf 24 Essential Mind Mapping and Brainstorming Tools Mind mapping is the process of using visual diagrams to show the relationships between ideas or information. Its popular uses include project planning, collecting and organizing thoughts, brainstorming and presentations — all in order to help solve problems, map out resources and uncover new ideas. It can be more useful than trying to keep track of our ideas by scribbling them on paper, and can aid in manipulating and generating concepts. We've compiled a list of 24 mind mapping tools to help you organize, summarize and visualize information, with both free and paid versions available to suit any budget or requirement. Is there a particular mind mapping tool you would recommend? 1. MindMeister was built to facilitate collaboration for mind mapping and brainstorming, with an intuitive, easy-to-use interface. You can access projects via mobile devices as well as online and offline, safe in the knowledge that your data is stored securely with data encryption and daily monitoring. 3. 4. 5.

Trading Card Creator The Trading Card tool gives students an alternative way to demonstrate their literacy knowledge and skill when writing about popular culture texts or real world examples. This interactive allows students to create their own trading card about a real or fictional person, place, object, event, or abstract concept. These cards are can be used with any type of book students are reading or subjects that they are studying, and make for an excellent prewriting exercise for students who are writing narrative stories and need to consider characters, setting, and plot. Specific prompts guide student through the various types of cards, expanding students' thinking from the basic information and description of the topic to making personal connections to the subject. The save capability gives students a way to work on a draft of their card and come back to it to rework and revise as necessary, and to save their finished product to share with friends and family. back to top

Free Technology for Teachers Icebreakers 'Icebreakers' are games or activities that help "break the ice" at events where there are lots of people who don't know each other. These games are easy to play and help the group to mix in a neutral challenge/s. this is by no means an exhaustive list and we always welcome suggestions of games you find that are good icebreakers. (email us) Ape, Man, Girl Game Both "Ape, Man, Girl" and "Elves, Wizards, Giants" are funnier team variations of the scissors, paper, stone game. Have people pair off. Balloon Game Posted on the Christian Youthworkers egroup Tie a balloon on a string (at least two feet long) to each person's ankle. Catch the Ball, Head the Ball Suggested by Neil Savory Arrange all participants in a circle. Players that get it wrong have to sit down. Communicating Challenge Try the "Line up game" this way.... Give everyone a number. Counting Game Have everyone in your group pair up and face each other. Variation: The Math Game Crash aka: 'Clump' Variation: Elves, Wizards, Giants Human Bingo

Sheppard Software: Fun free online learning games and activities for kids.

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