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Flipped Classroom

Flipped Classroom
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Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The "In-Class" Version So. You've tried flipping your class, and it didn't go well. Or you've heard about flipping and want to try the approach, but you're pretty sure it won't work in your school. Don't give up yet -- with a slight twist, flipping might be possible for you after all. Flipped classrooms -- where direct instruction happens via video at home, and "homework" takes place in class -- are all the rage right now, and for good reason. But successful flipping has one big catch -- if it's going to work, the at-home learning absolutely must happen. Arranging access before and after schoolLending out devicesSending recorded lectures home on flash drives or DVDs These are all workable solutions. Modifying the Flipped Classroom Concept None of these problems should stop us from trying, but there's another way to apply the flipped model without the problems associated with sending the work home. The teacher records a lecture. An In-Class Flip works like this. This video shows you how to do it: Advantages

“Fliperentiated” Instruction: How to Create the Customizable Classroom In a rapidly changing learning landscape, educators of all stripes still coalesce around two steady beliefs: Students perform best under conditions that activate their preferred learning style. There is no greater predictor of success than a fantastic teacher. Effective teaching has long put the unique interests of the learner up front, allowing teachers to meet the needs of more students more of the time. Call it "fliperentiated" instruction. What Happens Differentiated instruction is noted for, among other features, flexible groupings, scaffolded content, diverse instruction, and student choice. The stubborn part about differentiation, of course, is trying to synchronize the learning of an entire class in which not every student learns or does the same thing at the same time. Getting Started Effective fliperentiated instruction requires careful and intentional planning on the part of teachers. 1. 2. 3. Outcomes and Benefits The payoff from fliperentiated instruction is significant.

Khan Academy: My Final Remarks | Action-Reaction Many people aren’t getting the nuances of my recent Khan Academy arguments. I’ll make my final remarks and then put this thread to rest. Khan Academy videos are nothing new. MIT OpenCourseWare has been around for TEN YEARS now. Walter Lewin’s awesome physics lectures have been available for most of those 10 years — despite the fact they are pseudoteaching, and his students emerged with no greater understanding of physics than those of professors before him. And I didn’t have a problem with Khan Academy (as a collection of videos) until very recently. For me, the problem is the way Khan Academy is being promoted. (c) tcoffey (via Flickr) If your philosophy of education is sit-and-get, i.e., teaching is telling and learning is listening, then Khan Academy is way more efficient than classroom lecturing. But TRUE progressive educators, TRUE education visionaries and revolutionaries don’t want to do these things better. Watch one Modeling class in action: Feedback I would find WAY MORE useful:

Flipping the Classroom Printable Version “Flipping the classroom” has become something of a buzzword in the last several years, driven in part by high profile publications in The New York Times (Fitzpatrick, 2012); The Chronicle of Higher Education (Berrett, 2012); and Science (Mazur, 2009); In essence, “flipping the classroom” means that students gain first exposure to new material outside of class, usually via reading or lecture videos, and then use class time to do the harder work of assimilating that knowledge, perhaps through problem-solving, discussion, or debates. Bloom's Taxonomy (Revised)In terms of Bloom’s revised taxonomy (2001), this means that students are doing the lower levels of cognitive work (gaining knowledge and comprehension) outside of class, and focusing on the higher forms of cognitive work (application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in class, where they have the support of their peers and instructor. What is it? | Does it work? What is it? Flipped Classroom Inverted Classroom

Flipping the elementary classroom Flipped classrooms are a hot topic right now. In case it's a new term for you, here's a brief description. A flipped classroom flips, or reverses, traditional teaching methods. At the heart of the flipped classroom model is the desire to have classrooms be more active and engaging, and to give teachers more time to interact directly with students in small group or individual settings. At this point, most flipped classrooms are in high schools and colleges. For example, when I taught second grade, we always did a big unit on Explorers. If you'd like to know more about this topic, here are some resources to get you started: Flipped Learning Network, elementary grades Flipping the Elementary Classroom A good blog post on the topic by Jon Bergmann, one of the pioneers in the Flipped Classroom Movement Pros and Cons of the Flipped Classroom from Edutopia A popular infographic on the topic

Using Technology for Self-Reflection in the Classroom - Green Light Learning Tools by Helen Beyne At a time when yoga and meditation are part of the mainstream, terms such as self-reflection and metacognition have emerged as popular buzzwords even outside the field of neuroscience. The significance of these concepts is more than mere hype. Research has linked self-reflection to better emotional intelligence, higher confidence, greater mental flexibility, and even reduced risks of mood and anxiety disorders. These benefits also apply to children. The cognitive benefits of expressive writing cannot be overstated, and there are a wide variety of digital tools you can use to take your students’ writing beyond pencil and paper. Drawing is another activity that can be self-reflective and therapeutic. Helping students record videos of themselves is another fun and easy way to help them self-reflect. How else have you used technology to help your students self-reflect in the classroom? Helen Beyne is a consultant for Green Light Professional Development.

The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture Due to Khan Academy’s popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles. Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved. Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. A compiled resource page of the Flipped Classroom (with videos and links) can be found at The Flipped Classroom Model Summary

Social Media Gains Momentum in Online Education In his University of Hawaii online course, Introduction to e-Learning, associate professor Michael Menchaca requires his students to introduce themselves to each other by creating 15-second videos on Instagram. Later in the semester, students "meet" to discuss their group projects using Google Hangouts. Twitter is popular in his classes, too, enabling students to share resources and engage in discussions, Menchaca says. These are just two examples of the social media tools Menchaca uses to foster communication among his students. "We've had online learning for quite a long time – since the 1990s, when it started to become popular – but the inclusion of social media is something that's relatively new," Menchaca says. "A lot of us are starting to use it more. [Explore ways to use productivity apps in online classes.] There isn't much precise data available on social media's presence in the realm of online education, experts say. Jonah Preising, a student in Menchaca's class, agrees.

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