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Wikispaces was founded in 2005 and has since been used by educators, companies and individuals across the globe. Unfortunately, the time has come where we have had to make the difficult business decision to end the Wikispaces service. We first announced the site closure in January 2018, through a site-wide banner that appeared to all logged-in users and needed to be clicked on to dismiss During the closure period a range of banners were shown to users, including a countdown banner in the final month. Additionally, the home page of Wikispaces.com became a blog, detailing the reasons for the closure. Private Label Site Administrators were contacted separately regarding the closure Why has Wikispaces closed? Approximately 18 months ago, we completed a technical review of the infrastructure and software we used to serve Wikispaces users. Related:  jessicaknapp

What is Universal Design for Learning Universal Design for Learningis a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone--not a single, one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs. Why is UDL necessary? Individuals bring a huge variety of skills, needs, and interests to learning. Neuroscience reveals that these differences are as varied and unique as our DNA or fingerprints. Three primary brain networks come into play: Recognition Networks The "what" of learning How we gather facts and categorize what we see, hear, and read. Strategic Networks The "how" of learning Planning and performing tasks. Affective Networks The "why" of learning How learners get engaged and stay motivated. Source: CAST - What is UDL? Learn more about UDL:

The Three Principles Three primary principles, which are based on neuroscience research, guide UDL and provide the underlying framework for the Guidelines: Principle I: Provide Multiple Means of Representation (the “what” of learning) Learners differ in the ways that they perceive and comprehend information that is presented to them. For example, those with sensory disabilities (e.g., blindness or deafness); learning disabilities (e.g., dyslexia); language or cultural differences, and so forth may all require different ways of approaching content. Others may simply grasp information quicker or more efficiently through visual or auditory means rather than printed text. Principle II: Provide Multiple Means of Action and Expression (the “how” of learning) Learners differ in the ways that they can navigate a learning environment and express what they know. Principle III: Provide Multiple Means of Engagement (the “why” of learning) Learn more about UDL Guidelines 2.0:

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