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CoP: Best Practices

CoP: Best Practices
by Etienne Wenger [Published in the "Systems Thinker," June 1998] You are a claims processor working for a large insurance company. You are good at what you do, but although you know where your paycheck comes from, the corporation mainly remains an abstraction for you. The group you actually work for is a relatively small community of people who share your working conditions. It is with this group that you learn the intricacies of your job, explore the meaning of your work, construct an image of the company, and develop a sense of yourself as a worker. You are an engineer working on two projects within your business unit. You are a CEO and, of course, you are responsible for the company as a whole. We now recognize knowledge as a key source of competitive advantage in the business world, but we still have little understanding of how to create and leverage it in practice. We frequently say that people are an organization's most important resource. Defining Communities of Practice Dr.

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Related:  Communities of practice

The social/situational orientation to learning The social/situational orientation to learning. It is not so much that learners acquire structures or models to understand the world, but they participate in frameworks that that have structure. Learning involves participation in a community of practice. Social learning theory ‘posits that people learn from observing other people. By definition, such observations take place in a social setting’ (Merriam and Caffarella 1991: 134). CoP: Best Practices by Etienne Wenger [Published in the "Systems Thinker," June 1998] You are a claims processor working for a large insurance company. You are good at what you do, but although you know where your paycheck comes from, the corporation mainly remains an abstraction for you.

An Analysis of Key Factors for the Success of the Communal Management of Knowledge by Isabelle Bourdon, Chris Kimble Isabelle Bourdon Université Montpellier II Chris Kimble Kedge Business SchoolApril 4, 2008 Jean Lave, Etienne Wenger and communities of practice contents: introduction · communities of practice · legitimate peripheral participation and situated learning · learning organizations and learning communities · conclusion · references · links · how to cite this article Many of the ways we have of talking about learning and education are based on the assumption that learning is something that individuals do. Furthermore, we often assume that learning ‘has a beginning and an end; that it is best separated from the rest of our activities; and that it is the result of teaching’ (Wenger 1998: 3). But how would things look if we took a different track? Supposing learning is social and comes largely from of our experience of participating in daily life? It was this thought that formed the basis of a significant rethinking of learning theory in the late 1980s and early 1990s by two researchers from very different disciplines – Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger.

online learning insights The Web as a classroom is transforming how people learn, is driving the need for new pedagogy; two recently launched courses at Coursera highlight what happens when pedagogical methods fail to adapt. Divided pedagogy I wrote recently about the Fundamentals of Online: Education [FOE] the Coursera course that was suspended after its first week and is now in MOOC hibernation mode. Over thirty thousands students signed up for the course hoping to learn how to develop an online course. It was a technical malfunction when students were directed to sign-up for groups through a Google Doc that shuttered the course, along with hundreds of student complaints about lack of clear instructions, and poor lecture quality. The course was suspended on February 2, and there has been no word yet as to when it will resume :(.

Communities of Practice (Lave and Wenger) Summary: Etienne Wenger summarizes Communities of Practice (CoP) as “groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.” This learning that takes place is not necessarily intentional. Three components are required in order to be a CoP: (1) the domain, (2) the community, and (3) the practice. Originators: Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger in 1991 and further elaborated in 1998.

Knowledge Networks: Introduction Editors, Paul Hildreth and Chris Kimble Publisher, Idea Group Publishing Hard cover ISBN: 159140200X Soft cover ISBN: 1591402700 The current environment for organizations is one that is characterised by uncertainty and continuous change.

Computer Mediated Communications and Communities of Practice by Paul Hildreth, Chris Kimble, Peter Wright Paul M. Hildreth K-Now International Chris Kimble Parker J. Palmer: community, knowing and spirituality in education Parker J. Palmer: community, knowing and spirituality in education. Parker J. Palmer’s explorations of education as a spiritual journey and of the inner lives of educators have been deeply influential. We explore his teachings and contribution. Jean Lave, Etienne Wenger and communities of practice Jean Lave Etienne Wenger Communities of Practice (article gratefully downloaded from www.infed.org) The idea that learning involves a deepening process of participation in a community of practice has gained significant ground in recent years. Communities of practice have also become an important focus within organizational development. In this article we outline the theory and practice of such communities, and examine some of issues and questions for informal educators and those concerned with lifelong learning.

Exploring the links between Computer Supported Co-operative Work and Knowledge Management You are here: CSCW+KM HOME > TOPICS [Go to Teaching page] [Go to Publications page] History / context for these pages These pages were originally produced as on-line content for a short series of lectures to undergraduates at Sogn og Fjordane University College in Norway. The theme of the lectures was an exploration of the links between Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) and Knowledge Management (KM). Overview of the material Connectivism: Learning theory of the future or vestige of the past? Rita KopUniversity of Wales Swansea Adrian HillOpen School BC, Canada Abstract Siemens and Downes initially received increasing attention in the blogosphere in 2005 when they discussed their ideas concerning distributed knowledge.

Related:  Movement learningAdult Learner