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CoP: Best Practices

CoP: Best Practices
by Etienne Wenger [Published in the "Systems Thinker," June 1998] You are a claims processor working for a large insurance company. You are good at what you do, but although you know where your paycheck comes from, the corporation mainly remains an abstraction for you. The group you actually work for is a relatively small community of people who share your working conditions. It is with this group that you learn the intricacies of your job, explore the meaning of your work, construct an image of the company, and develop a sense of yourself as a worker. You are an engineer working on two projects within your business unit. You are a CEO and, of course, you are responsible for the company as a whole. We now recognize knowledge as a key source of competitive advantage in the business world, but we still have little understanding of how to create and leverage it in practice. We frequently say that people are an organization's most important resource. Defining Communities of Practice Dr.

CoP: Best Practices by Etienne Wenger [Published in the "Systems Thinker," June 1998] You are a claims processor working for a large insurance company. You are good at what you do, but although you know where your paycheck comes from, the corporation mainly remains an abstraction for you. You are an engineer working on two projects within your business unit. You are a CEO and, of course, you are responsible for the company as a whole. We now recognize knowledge as a key source of competitive advantage in the business world, but we still have little understanding of how to create and leverage it in practice. We frequently say that people are an organization's most important resource. However, they are a company's most versatile and dynamic knowledge resource and form the basis of an organization's ability to know and learn. Defining Communities of Practice Communities of practice are everywhere. Communities of practice develop around things that matter to people. Communities of Practice in Organizations Dr.

An Analysis of Key Factors for the Success of the Communal Management of Knowledge by Isabelle Bourdon, Chris Kimble Isabelle Bourdon Université Montpellier II Chris Kimble Kedge Business SchoolApril 4, 2008 Proceedings of 13th UKAIS Conference, Bournemouth, April 2008 Abstract: This paper explores the links between Knowledge Management and new community-based models of the organization from both a theoretical and an empirical perspective. Number of Pages in PDF File: 18 Keywords: Knowledge Management, Community-based, Communities of Practice, Gestion des Connaissances, Chief Knowledge Officers, Success Factors JEL Classification: D21, D70, D71, D83 Accepted Paper Series Suggested Citation Bourdon, Isabelle and Kimble, Chris, An Analysis of Key Factors for the Success of the Communal Management of Knowledge (April 4, 2008).

Jean Lave, Etienne Wenger and communities of practice contents: introduction · communities of practice · legitimate peripheral participation and situated learning · learning organizations and learning communities · conclusion · references · links · how to cite this article Many of the ways we have of talking about learning and education are based on the assumption that learning is something that individuals do. Furthermore, we often assume that learning ‘has a beginning and an end; that it is best separated from the rest of our activities; and that it is the result of teaching’ (Wenger 1998: 3). But how would things look if we took a different track? Supposing learning is social and comes largely from of our experience of participating in daily life? It was this thought that formed the basis of a significant rethinking of learning theory in the late 1980s and early 1990s by two researchers from very different disciplines – Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger. Communities of practice The characteristics of such communities of practice vary.

GLO Maker Less Formal Training; More Informal Social Learning This is an excerpt from Sharon Boller’s newest white paper, Learning Trends, Technologies and Opportunities. The white paper describes today’s learning landscape… then predicts 7 trends for the next 12 – 18 months. Here is Trend 6: Twitter chats, Twitter lists, massive open online courses (MOOCs), YouTube channels and blogs devoted to highly specific topics, resources such as Lynda.com, CodeAcademy, etc. are all examples of resources that enable people to build highly customized “personal learning networks” for themselves. Social learning has been touted by a brave few for a long time – Jane Bozarth and Jay Cross are two big names who’ve been beating the social learning and informal learning drum for the past few years. What it might look like: At BLP, we are our own “Learning Lab.” The premise is pretty simple. We’ve discovered a ton of new tools via these talks and we’ve also picked up new ideas for methods we could employ. If you miss the live chat – no problem.

Knowledge Networks: Introduction Editors, Paul Hildreth and Chris Kimble Publisher, Idea Group Publishing Hard cover ISBN: 159140200X Soft cover ISBN: 1591402700 The current environment for organizations is one that is characterised by uncertainty and continuous change. In the mid 1990s, a new approach called Knowledge Management (KM) began to emerge (Ponzi and Koenig, 2002). Communities of Practice (CoPs) as a phenomenon have been around for many years but the term itself was not coined until 1991 when Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger used it in their exploration of Situated Learning (Lave and Wenger, 1991). Lave and Wenger (1991) saw the acquisition of knowledge as a social process where people can participate in communal learning at different levels depending on their level of authority or seniority in the group, i.e. whether they are a newcomer to the group or have been a member for a long time. Thus, a new member of the community moves from peripheral to full participation in the community. What it is about? Evolution

Computer Mediated Communications and Communities of Practice by Paul Hildreth, Chris Kimble, Peter Wright Paul M. Hildreth K-Now International Chris Kimble Kedge Business School Peter Wright University of York (UK) - Department of Computer Science Proceedings of Ethicomp '98, Erasmus University, The Netherlands, pp. 275-286, March 1998 Abstract: Within the Knowledge Management context, there is growing interest in computer support for group knowledge sharing and the role that Communities of Practice play in this. Communities of Practice provide an excellent forum for knowledge sharing and a vital question is whether the new communications media, which provide new possibilities for collaboration and distributed working, could support the existence of such groups in a distributed environment. This paper reports on a case study which was the first stage in exploring whether Computer Mediated Communications technologies (CMCs) can support distributed international Communities of Practice. Number of Pages in PDF File: 15 JEL Classification: M12, M54, O33, O34 Accepted Paper Series Suggested Citation

Parker J. Palmer: community, knowing and spirituality in education Parker J. Palmer: community, knowing and spirituality in education. Parker J. Palmer’s explorations of education as a spiritual journey and of the inner lives of educators have been deeply influential. We explore his teachings and contribution. contents: introduction · parker j. palmer – life · education as a spiritual journey · parker palmer – knowing, teaching and learning · participating in a community of truth · creating space for learning · attending to the inner life of educators · calling · parker palmer – assessment and conclusion · further reading and references · parker palmer links · how to cite this piece My vocation (to use the poet’s term) is the spiritual life, the quest for God, which relies on the eye of the heart. Parker J. The terrain that Parker J. Life Parker J. Parker Palmer made the decision to leave the academy believing that a university career would be a ‘cop out’. Instead Parker J. The time at Pendle Hill was of fundamental significance. Parker J.

The Instructional Use of Learning Objects -- Online Version This is the online version of The Instructional Use of Learning Objects, a new book that tries to go beyond the technological hype and connect learning objects to instruction and learning. You can read the full text of the book here for free. The chapters presented here are © their respective authors and are licensed under the Open Publication License, meaning that you are free to copy and redistribute them in any electronic or non-commercial print form. For-profit print rights are held by AIT/AECT. The book was edited by David Wiley, and printed versions of the book are published by the Association for Instructional Technology and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology. In addition to reading the book, at this website you can participate in discussions of the book's chapters with the authors and others, submit any corrections should you find errors in a chapter, and discuss other issues related to learning objects, instruction, and learning. 1.0. 2.0. 3.0. 4.0.

Jo Bloggs: Connectivism and Communities of Practice The term Knowledge Management has traditionally referred to ongoing efforts to harness explicit and tacit knowledge within an organisation while 'organisational learning' tends to be more focussed on static efforts to meet specific learning objectives. Recently, the lines have become blurred to the extent that a merger in strategies should be considered by any organisation serious about harnessing knowledge and promoting learning. Siemens' article, 'Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age', discusses the need for 'a theory that attempts to explain the link between individual and organizational learning' (Siemens, 2004). He expands his theory of networked learning further in his article ‘Connectivism: Learning as Network-Creation’ (Siemens, 2005). I will demonstrate that the theories outlined in Siemens’ two articles are aligned with Wenger’s attempts to rethink learning in the shape of Communities of Practice (CoP). References: Pór. Siemens. Siemens. Wenger. Wenger.

Communauté de pratique Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Pour les articles homonymes, voir COP. La théorie des communautés de pratiques formalisée par Wenger (1998)[1] s'inscrit dans une évolution épistémologique qui a conduit le domaine de la gestion des connaissances d'une vision technocentrée vers une vision anthropocentrée. Cette théorie prône une perspective sociale de l’apprentissage, insérée dans les pratiques collectives au sein des communautés de pratique. Wenger (2005), développe le concept de communautés de pratique comme un groupe de personnes qui travaillent ensemble (à travers des plateformes internet par exemple tels que des forums, des vidéo-conférences, des courriels…) et qui sont en fait conduites à inventer constamment des solutions locales aux problèmes rencontrés dans leur pratiques professionnelles. Pour Wenger, trois dimensions structurent les communautés de pratique (Wenger, 1998) : Un engagement mutuel : Tous les membres de la communauté doivent respecter cet engagement.

Exploring the links between Computer Supported Co-operative Work and Knowledge Management You are here: CSCW+KM HOME > TOPICS [Go to Teaching page] [Go to Publications page] History / context for these pages These pages were originally produced as on-line content for a short series of lectures to undergraduates at Sogn og Fjordane University College in Norway. The theme of the lectures was an exploration of the links between Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW) and Knowledge Management (KM). Overview of the material In each of the pages below you will find the material needed to support one, one hour lecture. If you wish to research these topics in their your time, you might wish to use the MIS links page as a starting point for this. Overview The following texts should provide you with a general overview of the key themes of these lectures: CSCW: History and Focus This paper provides an overview of CSCW and groupware. Lectures The links below will take you directly to the lecture concerned.

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