background preloader

Neil deGrasse Tyson

Neil deGrasse Tyson
Neil deGrasse Tyson (/ˈniːəl dəˈɡræs ˈtaɪsən/; born October 5, 1958) is an American astrophysicist, author, and science communicator. He is currently the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space and a research associate in the department of astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History. From 2006 to 2011, he hosted the educational science television show NOVA ScienceNow on PBS and has been a frequent guest on The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, Real Time with Bill Maher, and Jeopardy!. Tyson is the host of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, an update to Carl Sagan's Cosmos: A Personal Voyage television series; the updated series started in March 2014.[2] Early life[edit] Astronomer Carl Sagan, who was a faculty member at Cornell University, tried to recruit Tyson to Cornell for undergraduate studies.[3] In an interview with writer Daniel Simone,[8] Tyson said: Promoting Cosmos TV series in Australia for National Geographic Career[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_deGrasse_Tyson

Related:  Outside the Box

Brian Greene Early life[edit] Greene was born in New York City. His father, Alan Greene, was a one-time vaudeville performer and high school dropout who later worked as a voice coach and composer. He stated in an interview with Lawrence Krauss that he is of Jewish heritage. After attending Stuyvesant High School,[2] Greene entered Harvard in 1980 to concentrate in physics. Erik Verlinde Erik Peter Verlinde (born 21 January 1962) is a Dutch theoretical physicist and string theorist. He is the identical twin brother of physicist Herman Verlinde. The Verlinde formula, which is important in conformal field theory and topological field theory, is named after him. His research deals with string theory, gravity, black holes and cosmology.

Thomas Story Kirkbride This article is about the American Physician Thomas Story Kirkbride. For the British writer, see Thomas Story. Thomas Story Kirkbride (July 31, 1809 - December 16, 1883) was a physician, advocate for the mentally ill, and founder of the Association of Medical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane (AMSAII), a precursor to the American Psychiatric Association.[1][2][3] Early career[edit] Born into a Quaker family in Morrisville, Pennsylvania, Kirkbride began a study of medicine in 1828 under Dr. Nicholas Belleville, of Trenton, New Jersey when he was eighteen.[4][5] After receiving a medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1832, Kirkbride had his own practice from 1835 to 1840.[4][5]

Brian Cox (physicist) Brian Edward Cox OBE (born 3 March 1968)[1] is an English physicist and former musician, a Royal Society University Research Fellow, PPARC Advanced Fellow at the University of Manchester.[13][14] He is a member of the High Energy Physics group at the University of Manchester, and works on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)[15][16] at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland. He is working on the research and development project of the FP420 experiment in an international collaboration to upgrade the ATLAS and the CMS experiment by installing additional, smaller detectors at a distance of 420 metres from the interaction points of the main experiments.[17][18][19][20] Cox's parents were bankers[1] and he attended the independent Hulme Grammar School[24] in Oldham from 1979 to 1986.[25][26][27] Cox revealed on The Jonathan Ross Show that he performed poorly on his Maths A-level: "I got a D ...

Hyper-Lexikon: Spencer-Brown Spencer-Brown, George: Laws of Form - Gesetze der Form. Bohmeier-Verlag, Lübeck 1997 S.194: "When we die the self-boundary eventually disappears. Before it did so, we ascribed a huge value to what we called 'inside' of ourselves, and comparativeley little value to what we called 'outside'.

Antony Garrett Lisi Lisi is known for "An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything," a paper proposing a unified field theory based on the E8 Lie group, combining particle physics with Einstein's theory of gravitation. The theory is incomplete and not widely accepted by the physics community. Biography[edit] Early life[edit] After the Ph.D.[edit]

Richard E. Bellman Richard Ernest Bellman (August 26, 1920 – March 19, 1984) was an American applied mathematician, celebrated for his invention of dynamic programming in 1953, and important contributions in other fields of mathematics. Biography[edit] Later in life, Richard Bellman's interests began to emphasize biology and medicine, which he identified as ``the frontiers of contemporary science. In 1967, he became founding editor of the journal Mathematical Biosciences which specialized in the publication of applied mathematics research for medical and biological topics. In 1985, the Bellman Prize in Mathematical Biosciences was created in his honor, being award biannually to the journal's best research paper.

Stephen Hawking Stephen William Hawking CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA ( i/ˈstiːvən ˈhɔːkɪŋ/; born 8 January 1942) is an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge.[16][17] His scientific works include a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity, and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set forth a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics.

Physics of the Future Contents[edit] Each chapter is sorted into three sections: Near future (2000-2030), Midcentury (2030-2070), and Far future (2070-2100). Kaku notes that the time periods are only rough approximations, but show the general time frame for the various trends in the book.[1] A Brief History of Time Overview[edit] A Brief History of Time attempts to explain a range of subjects in cosmology, including the big bang, black holes and light cones, to the nonspecialist reader. Its main goal is to give an overview of the subject, but unusual for a popular science book, it also attempts to explain some complex mathematics. The 1996 edition of the book and subsequent editions discuss the possibility of time travel and wormholes and explore the possibility of having a universe without a quantum singularity at the beginning of time.

Related: