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An Introduction to Color Theory for Web Designers

An Introduction to Color Theory for Web Designers
Today we're going to learn the importance of color in Web Design and how to choose a pleasing color scheme. This article is part of our Basix series, which is aimed at providing practical and concise explanations of design principles for those with little design experience... let's get started! This article is written for people that are just starting to learn formal design principles. It is not meant to be a comprehensive study of how to apply color to a design (we'll have plenty of those in the future), but rather, it's an overview for those looking for practical advice that will help them approach color theory within the context of a web design project. I'm writing this because I've always found it difficult to decide on a color scheme that works well for a project; it's probably one of the toughest decisions that I have to make as a designer. The interaction of colors in a design through complementation, contrast, and vibrancy. Two examples of an Analogous color scheme are:

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The Ultimate Directory Of Free Image Sources So, you need an image for your blog? We’ve spent some time categorizing our favorite sources for free images and organizing them in such a way as to help you find what you’re looking for. Here are the criteria we’ve examined: Digital Web Magazine The web professional's online magazine of choice. Joshua David McClurg-Genevese Former Columnist 50 Beautiful Color Palettes for Your Next Web Project Choosing the right color scheme is essential to your website’s success. Your layout and other design choices — including font — should be developed in concert with your color scheme, which can ensure readability, cohesiveness, and beauty in the final product. Unfortunately, making that choice or creating a color palette from scratch can be quite the challenge. That’s why for today’s post I’ve put together a collection of 50 beautiful color palettes that are ready to use for your next web project. If you like these, check out another 24 palettes I’ve recently rounded up.

Are you giving your clients too many options? February 10, 2014 Brain Games is an ambitious new program on National Geographic that tries to get in viewers' heads with different interactive experiments that reveal the inner workings of our brains. Many of the experiments challenge what you think you know to be true about something, and a recent episode focused on the notion of ‘choice' – how choices we are given impact our level of happiness or displeasure. The host put forward the assumption that providing people with more choices makes them happier, because they do not feel restricted selecting an option that is not right for them. In the show, the hosts asks whether you preferred choosing between more than 20 flavors of ice cream, or between three flavors of ice cream. Seems like a no-brainer, right?

Facebook Login for the Web Using the JavaScript SDK If people using your app aren't logged into your app or not logged into Facebook, you can use the Login dialog to prompt them to do both. Various versions of the dialog are shown below. If they aren't logged into Facebook, they'll first be prompted to log in and then move on to logging in to your app. The JavaScript SDK automatically detects this, so you don't need to do anything extra to enable this behavior.

Page Structure and Site Design Web “sites” are complete abstractions—they don’t exist, except in our heads. When we identify a site as such, what we’re really describing is a collection of individual linked pages that share a common graphic and navigational look and feel. What creates the illusion of continuity across a cohesive “site” is the design features that pages share. Individual html pages and how they are designed and linked are the atomic unit of web sites, and everything that characterizes site structure must appear in the page templates. As the web has matured over the past decade, the structure of web pages in text-driven information sites has become more uniform and predictable.

Responsive web design Responsive web design (RWD) is an approach to web design aimed at crafting sites to provide an optimal viewing experience—easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling—across a wide range of devices (from desktop computer monitors to mobile phones).[1][2][3] A site designed with RWD[1][4] adapts the layout to the viewing environment by using fluid, proportion-based grids,[5][6] flexible images,[7][8][9] and CSS3 media queries,[3][10][11] an extension of the @media rule, in the following ways:[12] Related concepts[edit] Mobile first, unobtrusive JavaScript, and progressive enhancement[edit] Color Theory for Designer, Part 3: Creating Your Own Color Palettes Advertisement In the previous two parts of this series on color theory, we talked mostly about the meanings behind colors1 and color terminology2. While this information is important, I’m sure a lot of people were wondering when we were going to get into the nitty-gritty of actually creating some color schemes. Well, that’s where Part 3 comes in. Here we’ll be talking about methods for creating your own color schemes, from scratch. We’ll cover the traditional color scheme patterns (monochrome, analogous, complementary, etc.) as well as how to create custom schemes that aren’t based strictly on any one pattern.

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