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The Ludologist – My name is Jesper Juul, and I am a ludologist [Noun. Video Game Researcher]. This is my blog on game research and other important things. These are some comments from my keynote at Rutger’s Extending Play conference in 2016, co-presenting with Shaka McGlotten. Hasn’t our sense of play suddenly become quite dark? There is a change in our primary conceptions of playing, and game-playing. In Brian Sutton-Smith’s Ambiguity of play, he lists 7 common rhetorics of play, meaning 7 common ways in which play is framed. When the field of game studies began, we probably used four quite positive rhetorics of play: Rhetoric of play as progress.Rhetoric of play as fate.Rhetoric of play as power.Rhetoric of play as identity.Rhetoric of play as the imaginary.Rhetoric of the self.Rhetoric of play as frivolous.

UN-HABITAT Adopts First-Ever Resolution on Public Spaces Resolution Requests UN-HABITAT’s Executive Director to Ensure the Application of Place-Making Internationally April 15, 2011- Nairobi, Kenya The Governing Council of UN-HABITAT (United Nations Human Settlement Programme) has adopted the first-ever public space resolution which urges the development of a policy approach for the international application of Placemaking.

Case Studies from the SCN Website Whereas some case studies from the previous Sustainable Communities Network website are no longer available, Sustainability in Action: Profiles of Community Initiatives Across the United States is included on this website and is available in PDF format. These profiles of sustainability initiatives, one from each state and the District of Columbia, were originally prepared in 1995 for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Urban and Economic Development Office which became the Office of Sustainable Communities in 2010. In 1996, they were subsequently included in the Sustainable Communities Task Force Report of the President's Council on Sustainable Development.

Why Play Matters The Problem America's kids are playing less than any previous generation. Only one in four adolescents get the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity or active play per day, with the number of younger kids only slightly higher. Because of this, they are increasingly unhappy, unhealthy and falling behind: one in three kids is obese or overweight and one in five kids has a mental illness. Moreover, kids are not developing critical 21st century skills—such as collaboration, creativity, problem-solving, resilience and empathy—that they will need to succeed as adults in the global economy.

Detroit Leads the Way on Place-Centered Revitalization Future plans for Cadillac Square call for a lively marketplace / Image: PPS You may have heard about downtown Detroit’s big comeback story. Campus Martius has become one of America’s great urban squares. Demand for housing has outstripped supply for months. About Us The mission of the Center for Global Initiatives is to expand global opportunities at UNC through collaborative programs + projects and competitive awards + fellowships that connect people across borders and disciplines. We pursue this goal through a wide range of initiatives such as directing UNC’s Fulbright Program, funding faculty to develop new global courses, empowering students to conduct ambitious research and internships abroad, and connecting North Carolina K-12 classrooms with UNC’s global resources. We are especially interested in opening access to global opportunities to students, faculty, and staff traditionally underrepresented in this sphere. Our vision is that everyone at UNC has access to such opportunities and can seize them if desired.

The Playful Thinking Series Works of Game: On the Aesthetics of Games and Art by John Sharp Games and art have intersected at least since the early twentieth century, as can be seen in the Surrealists' use of Exquisite Corpse and other games, Duchamp's obsession with Chess, and Fluxus event scores and boxes–to name just a few examples. Over the past fifteen years, the synthesis of art and games has clouded for both artists and gamemakers. Contemporary art has drawn on the tool set of videogames, but has not considered them a cultural form with its own conceptual, formal, and experiential affordances. For their part, game developers and players focus on the innate properties of games and the experiences they provide, giving little attention to what it means to create and evaluate fine art.

Why Cities Can't Afford to Lose Their Artists The Art Basel Miami Beach art fair kicks off this week, an event that drew 75,000 people and 140 international museum and international groups in 2013. The art fair is widely credited with kick-starting the economic resurgence of the Miami area, so it seems like a good time to ask: What do we really know about the role of art in the city? Does it help to drive economic growth and development or does it contribute to gentrification? Are leading edge arts clusters found just in big cities, like New York and Los Angeles, or can they spread to smaller and medium sized ones as well?

Solid Waste and Emergency Response You are here: EPA Home Solid Waste and Emergency Response Community Engagement Initiative Community Engagement Initiative Overview The EPA Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) Community Engagement Initiative (CEI) is designed to enhance OSWER and regional offices’ engagement with local communities and stakeholders to help them meaningfully participate in government decisions on land cleanup, emergency preparedness and response, and the management of hazardous substances and waste. Learn more about CEI. Public Review Requested OSWER seeks and encourages feedback from communities, stakeholders, local governments, tribes and states on the CEI and all available documents and outcomes.

Millennium Villages – Center for Sustainable Development The Millennium Villages Project’s sites are areas in which community-level work is done to advance MDG related goals in health, nutrition, and education. Accomplishments in these sectors will be documented over the life of the project. Areas of measurement will include malaria morbidity, access to water and sanitation, education attendance and performance, and availability of school meals. The findings will review lessons learned in empowering local communities to achieve the MDGs. The World's Water Water Conflict Chronology In an ongoing effort to understand the connections between water resources, water systems, and international security and conflict, the Pacific Institute initiated a project in the late 1980s to track and categorize events related to water and conflict, which has been continuously updated since. Our new format, updated November 2009, presents the information three ways, to better illustrate how conflicts over water impact history: View the Water Conflict Chronology (updated 11/09) Changes to Chronology Reflect New Data Recent world events from the Middle East to China to India to Ethiopia and other regions have, unfortunately, continued to lead to new entries. And new information is being sent in all the time by historians, water experts, and readers to update, correct, and expand the current chronology.

How Deep Do Tree Roots Really Grow? Our 2010 blog entry by James Urban, FASLA, on the topic of how deep tree roots grow is consistently one of our most popular. Obviously there is a curiosity about this topic and a need for useful data about it. But the original post is a little technical and not as image-heavy as we’d like. So today we’re bringing you a new and improved version of the original post, with additional pictures and more simplified explanation of the factors that really influence how deep tree roots grow.

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