background preloader

Reinventing Organizations - Home

Reinventing Organizations - Home

http://www.reinventingorganizations.com/

Related:  Innovation managérialeKnow the CommunityRandomEconomie CollaborativeNew Organisations and Business Models

Creativity, Inc. — Amy Wallace Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration By Ed Catmull with Amy Wallace From Ed Catmull, co-founder (with Steve Jobs and John Lasseter) of Pixar Animation Studios, comes an incisive book about creativity in business—sure to appeal to readers of Daniel Pink, Tom Peters, and Chip and Dan Heath. Creativity, Inc. is a book for managers who want to lead their employees to new heights, a manual for anyone who strives for originality, and the first-ever, all-access trip into the nerve center of Pixar Animation—into the meetings, postmortems, and “Braintrust” sessions where some of the most successful films in history are made.

The first website went online 25 years ago today Where are the creators in 2015? Berners-Lee is still as tightly involved with web as he ever was, directing the World Wide Web Consortium he helped create. In fact, he's pushing hard to protect the open web against both government censorship and telecoms' attempts to crush net neutrality. CERN's role, however, has changed somewhat. While it's still embroiled in networking research (specifically grid computing), it's more often known for smashing particles.

National Council of Architectural Registration Boards Interns must acquire 5,600 hours to satisfy the IDP experience requirement. One hour equals one hour of acceptable experience in an IDP experience setting. It is an intern’s responsibility to understand the requirements of any jurisdiction where they may seek either initial or reciprocal registration. Robin Chase Robin Chase is a transportation entrepreneur. She is co-founder and former CEO of Zipcar, the largest carsharing company in the world; Buzzcar, a peer to peer carsharing service in France (now merged with Drivy); and GoLoco, an online ridesharing community. She is also co-founder and Executive Chairman of Veniam, a vehicle communications company building the networking fabric for the Internet of Moving Things. She is on the Boards of Veniam, the World Resources Institute, and Tucows. She also served on the board of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, the National Advisory Council for Innovation & Entrepreneurship for the US Department of Commerce, the Intelligent Transportations Systems Program Advisory Committee for the US Department of Transportation, the OECD’s International Transport Forum Advisory Board, the Massachusetts Governor’s Transportation Transition Working Group, and Boston Mayor’s Wireless Task Force.

Thomas L. Friedman History of the world twenty years from now, and they come to the chapter "Y2K to March 2004," what will they say was the most crucial development? The attacks on the World Trade Center on 9/11 and the Iraq war? Or the convergence of technology and events that allowed India, China, and so many other countries to become part of the global supply chain for services and manufacturing, creating an explosion of wealth in the middle classes of the world's two biggest nations, giving them a huge new stake in the success of globalization? The No-Managers Organizational Approach Doesn't Work Zappos may have discovered that employees need managers after all. The online shoe and clothing retailer's holacracy management system doesn't appear to be working. According to a recent New York Times article, Zappos continues to "hemorrhage employees" as a result of the companywide implementation of holacracy. A no-manager approach, holacracy is characterized by a fluid organizational structure in which teams are self-organized and individuals have high autonomy and authority to make decisions at a local level. According to Holacracy.org, holacracy is a "new way of running an organization that removes power from a management hierarchy and distributes it across clear roles, which can then be executed autonomously, without a micromanaging boss." Unfortunately for Zappos, the holacracy experiment is causing workers to quit in droves, with 14% of employees leaving within weeks of the company introducing holacracy.

Consensus reality Consensus reality[1][2] is that which is generally agreed to be reality, based on a consensus view. The difficulty with the question stems from the concern that human beings do not in fact fully understand or agree upon the nature of knowledge or ontology, and therefore it is not possible to be certain beyond doubt what is real.[3][4] Accordingly, this line of logic concludes, we cannot in fact be sure beyond doubt about the nature of reality. We can, however, seek to obtain some form of consensus, with others, of what is real. We can use this consensus as a pragmatic guide, either on the assumption that it seems to approximate some kind of valid reality, or simply because it is more "practical" than perceived alternatives. Throughout history this has also raised a social question: "What shall we make of those who do not agree with consensus realities of others, or of the society they live in?"

Are You an Introverted Boss? - Douglas R. Conant by Douglas R. Conant | 10:19 AM April 4, 2011 Every time I’ve taken a Meyers-Briggs test, I score high on the introversion scale. As an introvert, I enjoy being by myself. Primavera De Filippi Primavera De Filippi is a permanent researcher at the National Center of Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris. She is faculty associate at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School, where she is investigating the concept of "governance-by-design" as it relates to online distributed architectures. Most of her research focuses on the legal challenges raised, and faced by emergent decentralized technologies —such as Bitcoin, Ethereum and other blockchain-based applications —and how these technologies could be used to design new governance models capable of supporting large-scale decentralized collaboration and more participatory decision-making. Academic career: Primavera obtained a Master degree in Business & Administration from the Bocconi University of Milan, and a Master degree in Intellectual Property Law at the Queen Mary University of London. Online activities:

Do rents matter to startup hubs Following yesterday’s post about the factors behind cities like New York, London and San Francisco becoming startup hubs, a friend asked “let me gues — cheap rents?” In truth it’s the opposite; none of the cities cited as startup centres are cheap places to live or work and London is usually towards the top of the most expensive places on the planet. That rents aren’t a huge factor is possibly because the typical tech startup is a lean operation with a small team crammed into a crowded location. One suspects though there are limits to how much a business conserving its cash will pay — you don’t see many startups based in A-grade locations alongside big law firms and banks — and this may be the weaknesses of these big cities. Certainly in London’s Silicon Alley the complaint is the days of cheap rent are long gone and newer startups have to base themselves in other locations across the city. Overall, rents are important but they aren’t the critical factor in developing a tech sector hub.

Gary Hamel: Reinventing the Technology of Human Accomplishment Watch Gary Hamel, celebrated management thinker and author and co-founder of the Management Innovation eXchange (MIX), make the case for reinventing management for the 21st century. In this fast-paced, idea-packed, 15-minute video essay, Hamel paints a vivid picture of what it means to build organizations that are fundamentally fit for the future—resilient, inventive, inspiring and accountable. "Modern” management is one of humanity’s most important inventions, Hamel argues. But it was developed more than a century ago to maximize standardization, specialization, hierarchy, control, and shareholder interests.

A Crude Look at the Whole looks at complexity theory, which wants to understand everything. Image by agsandrew/Thinkstock The world has gotten a lot smaller over the past century, but the store of knowledge has become unfathomably large. One way to think about it: Last week, I was able to fly across the country in five hours while carrying 10,000 PDFs on my laptop. In his new book A Crude Look at the Whole: The Science of Complex Systems in Business, Life, and Society, complexity theorist John H. Miller puts it this way: “Science has proceeded by developing increasingly detailed maps of decreasingly small phenomena.”

Related:  Books to ReadOrganizational Development