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How Mindfulness Helps You See What's Missing (And Why You'd Want To)

How Mindfulness Helps You See What's Missing (And Why You'd Want To)
In Basic Mindfulness (the system of Mindfulness I teach) there’s a term called “Gone.” Gone refers to any moment of partial or complete disappearance that you happen to notice. It’s as simple as that. If you notice a bird stop chirping, if you notice an itch become less itchy, if you notice a car pass by and disappear from view, you could call these events “Gone.” The technique sensitizes you to a fundamental truth: everything is always disappearing. Impermanence is something you can understand intellectually, as in “this too shall pass.” What I find tragically fascinating about this technique is how frequently students think they’re doing it wrong or don’t believe they can do it at all. Something happened to me the other day that gave me insight into this dilemma, and illuminated the trap our minds so easily get caught in. These minds of ours get stuck – sometimes terribly, terribly stuck. I feel so lucky to have caught the bus of that beautiful moment. Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-12678/how-mindfulness-helps-you-see-whats-missing-and-why-youd-want-to.html

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Harvard Yoga Scientists Find Proof of Meditation Benefit Scientists are getting close to proving what yogis have held to be true for centuries -- yoga and meditation can ward off stress and disease. John Denninger, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School, is leading a five-year study on how the ancient practices affect genes and brain activity in the chronically stressed. His latest work follows a study he and others published earlier this year showing how so-called mind-body techniques can switch on and off some genes linked to stress and immune function. While hundreds of studies have been conducted on the mental health benefits of yoga and meditation, they have tended to rely on blunt tools like participant questionnaires, as well as heart rate and blood pressure monitoring.

How to Rewire Your Brain to Be More Kind Toward Others Kindness is the state of caring about other people’s well-being and taking action to help make other people’s lives better and happier. It is a social glue that allows us to connect with others and build meaningful relationships with them When someone does something kind for us, we like them more and we want to cooperate with them more. Banned TED Talk: Graham Hancock – The War on Consciousness Yet another TED talk banned by the TED community due to the challenge it poses to mainstream science. The talk was done at a TEDx conference and aired on the TEDx YouTube channel for a period of time before it was removed due to its content. After personally listening to this talk it is quite clear why it was censored.

New Research Proves That Not Only Does Meditation Calm You Down, It Actually Alters Your Brain by Caitlin White 11/29/2014 Many people swear by meditation and mindfulness exercises as a way to increase happiness and peacefulness, but now Harvard researchers have discovered that these exercises might also increase growth of the brain’s gray matter and have measurable changes upon brain areas that are associated with memory, sense of self, empathy, and stress. The study will be published in next January’s issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, but the Harvard-affiliated research team at Massachusetts General Hospital already reported their findings about the meditation-produced changes in the brain’s gray matter. “Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation, practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day,” said one of the study’s senior author Sara Lazar.

3 Things Mindfulness is Not. ~ Ruth Lera Via Ruth Leraon Apr 18, 2014 The experience of practicing mindfulness or meditation is one that is most often beyond words. There is an elusive quality to touching into the moment—and only this moment—that is hard to describe, perhaps impossible. However, in our North American perfectionist culture, which is obsessed with hating ourselves and constantly striving to be better, the word mindfulness has been usurped to mean many different things. 1. Meditation Strengthens The Mind 22nd March 2012 By Science Daily Earlier evidence out of UCLA suggested that meditating for years thickens the brain (in a good way) and strengthens the connections between brain cells. Now a further report by UCLA researchers suggests yet another benefit.

Trying Not to Try: How to Cultivate the Paradoxical Art of Spontaneity Through the Chinese Concept of Wu-Wei by Maria Popova “Our modern conception of human excellence is too often impoverished, cold, and bloodless. Success does not always come from thinking more rigorously or striving harder.” “The best way to get approval is not to need it,” Hugh MacLeod memorably counseled. We now know that perfectionism kills creativity and excessive goal-setting limits our success rather than begetting it — all different manifestations of the same deeper paradox of the human condition, at once disconcerting and comforting, which Edward Slingerland, professor of Asian Studies and Embodied Cognition at the University of British Columbia and a renowned scholar of Chinese thought, explores in Trying Not to Try: The Art and Science of Spontaneity (public library | IndieBound).

Harvard Study Unveils What Meditation Literally Does To The Brain Numerous studies have indicated the many physiological benefits of meditation, and the latest one comes from Harvard University. An eight week study conducted by Harvard researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) determined that meditation literally rebuilds the brains grey matter in just eight weeks. It’s the very first study to document that meditation produces changes over time in the brain’s grey matter. (1) “Although the practice of meditation is associated with a sense of peacefulness and physical relaxation, practitioners have long claimed that meditation also provides cognitive and psychological benefits that persist throughout the day. This study demonstrates that changes in brain structure may underlie some of these reported improvements and that people are not just feeling better because they are spending time relaxing.” – (1) Sara Lazar of the MGH Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Program and a Harvard Medical School Instructor in Psychology How To Meditate

The Surprising Truth of Sufficiency We each have the choice in any setting to step back and let go of the mindset of scarcity. Once we let go of scarcity, we discover the surprising truth of sufficiency. By sufficiency, I don’t mean a quantity of anything. Sufficiency isn’t two steps up from poverty or one step short of abundance. It isn’t a measure of barely enough or more than enough. Sufficiency isn’t an amount at all. How To Rest Your Mind. ~ Rose Taylor Goldfield Indian teachers of yoga say that the Corpse Pose is the hardest yoga pose for Westerners. In Corpse Pose, we lie on the floor and surrender to the earth, leaving the body in perfect rest and stillness as though dead. But many of us have problems even with the pose of complete rest.

What is Meditation / Mindfulness Good for? What are the effects of meditation & mindfulness, according to the latest scientific research? What’s it good for? And while we’re at it, what’s the difference between meditation and mindfulness anyway? 7 Practices for Peacemakers “When a person is established in nonviolence, those in his vicinity cease to feel hostility.” — Patanjali This book excerpt is from Peace Is the Way by Deepak Chopra. The approach of personal transformation is the idea of the future for ending war.

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