background preloader

Rapid application development

Rapid application development
Rapid Application Development (RAD) Model Rapid application development (RAD) is a software development methodology that uses minimal planning in favor of rapid prototyping. The "planning" of software developed using RAD is interleaved with writing the software itself. The lack of extensive pre-planning generally allows software to be written much faster, and makes it easier to change requirements. History[edit] Rapid Application Development (RAD) is a term originally used for describing a software development process first developed and successfully deployed during the mid-1970s by the New York Telephone Co's Systems Development Center under the direction of Dan Gielan. Rapid application development is a response to processes developed in the 1970s and 1980s, such as the Structured Systems Analysis and Design Method and other Waterfall models. Four phases of RAD[edit] Relative effectiveness[edit] Criticism[edit] Practical implications[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Maurer and S.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapid_application_development

Related:  AGILE

Iterative and incremental development Iterative and Incremental development is any combination of both iterative design or iterative method and incremental build model for development. The combination is of long standing [1] and has been widely suggested for large development efforts. For example, the 1985 DOD-STD-2167[2] mentions (in section 4.1.2): "During software development, more than one iteration of the software development cycle may be in progress at the same time." and "This process may be described as an 'evolutionary acquisition' or 'incremental build' approach." The relationship between iterations and increments is determined by the overall software development methodology and software development process.

Object-oriented programming Overview[edit] Rather than structure programs as code and data, an object-oriented system integrates the two using the concept of an "object". An object has state (data) and behavior (code). IBM Rational Unified Process The Rational Unified Process (RUP) is an iterative software development process framework created by the Rational Software Corporation, a division of IBM since 2003.[1] RUP is not a single concrete prescriptive process, but rather an adaptable process framework, intended to be tailored by the development organizations and software project teams that will select the elements of the process that are appropriate for their needs. RUP is a specific implementation of the Unified Process. History[edit] Combining the experience base of companies led to the articulation of six best practices for modern software engineering: Develop iteratively, with risk as the primary iteration driver[2]Manage requirementsEmploy a component-based architectureModel software visuallyContinuously verify qualityControl changes a tailorable process that guided developmenttools that automated the application of that processservices that accelerated adoption of both the process and the tools.

Agile software development Agile software development is a set of principles for software development in which requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing,[1] cross-functional teams. It promotes adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, and continuous improvement, and it encourages rapid and flexible response to change.[2] Agile itself has never defined any specific methods to achieve this, but many have grown up as a result and have been recognized as being 'Agile'. The Manifesto for Agile Software Development,[3] also known as the Agile Manifesto, was first proclaimed in 2001, after "agile methodology" was originally introduced in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The manifesto came out of the DSDM Consortium in 1994, although its roots go back to the mid 1980s at DuPont and texts by James Martin[4] and James Kerr et al.[5]

Scrum (development) Scrum is an iterative and incremental agile software development framework for managing product development. It defines "a flexible, holistic product development strategy where a development team works as a unit to reach a common goal", challenges assumptions of the "traditional, sequential approach" to product development, and enables teams to self-organize by encouraging physical co-location or close online collaboration of all team members, as well as daily face-to-face communication among all team members and disciplines in the project. A key principle of Scrum is its recognition that during a project the customers can change their minds about what they want and need (often called "requirements churn"), and that unpredicted challenges cannot be easily addressed in a traditional predictive or planned manner. Later, Schwaber with others founded the Scrum Alliance and created the Certified Scrum Master programs and its derivatives. Each sprint is started by a planning meeting.

Dynamic systems development method Model of the DSDM Atern project management method. Dynamic systems development method (DSDM) is an agile project delivery framework, primarily used as a software development method. First released in 1994, DSDM originally sought to provide some discipline to the rapid application development (RAD) method. In 2007 DSDM became a generic approach to project management and solution delivery. DSDM is an iterative and incremental approach that embraces principles of Agile development, including continuous user/customer involvement.

Waterfall model The unmodified "waterfall model". Progress flows from the top to the bottom, like a cascading waterfall. The waterfall model is a sequential design process, used in software development processes, in which progress is seen as flowing steadily downwards (like a waterfall) through the phases of Conception, Initiation, Analysis, Design, Construction, Testing, Production/Implementation and Maintenance. The waterfall development model originates in the manufacturing and construction industries: highly structured physical environments in which after-the-fact changes are prohibitively costly, if not impossible. Since no formal software development methodologies existed at the time, this hardware-oriented model was simply adapted for software development.[1] §History[edit]

Agile Software Is A Cop-Out; Here’s What’s Next Never has a new trend annoyed me as much as Agile. Right from the get-go, the Agile Manifesto revealed the weaknesses and immaturity of the founding principles. The two most disturbing: “Working software is the primary measure of progress” and “Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.”

Software prototyping Software prototyping is the activity of creating prototypes of software applications, i.e., incomplete versions of the software program being developed. It is an activity that can occur in software development and is comparable to prototyping as known from other fields, such as mechanical engineering or manufacturing. A prototype typically simulates only a few aspects of, and may be completely different from, the final product.

List of Unified Modeling Language tools From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article compares Unified Modeling Language tools. General[edit] Features[edit] IBM Rational Unified Process The Rational Unified Process (RUP) is an iterative software development process framework created by the Rational Software Corporation, a division of IBM since 2003.[1] RUP is not a single concrete prescriptive process, but rather an adaptable process framework, intended to be tailored by the development organizations and software project teams that will select the elements of the process that are appropriate for their needs. RUP is a specific implementation of the unified process. History[edit] Philippe Kruchten, an experienced Rational technical representative was tasked with heading up the original RUP team.

The Backlog Caveats I continually abuse 2 terms below, Backlog and Sprint. Sprints don’t have to be 2 weeks, but for the sake of simplicity, I assume they are. Also, Backlogs contain user stories, not requirements or features. Technical Debt This article will discuss what Technical Debt is from a Flash/Flex developer perspective, how it negatively affects my Scrum projects, and what are some of the prescribed ways to prevent it. Nothing ground breaking here folks, just corroboration that TD IS a major problem, and not even Scrum is immune. What is Technical Debt?

Related: