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Wildflowers: GardenWeb Index

Wildflowers: GardenWeb Index
Related:  risullymarywithBees, butterflies

Identify That Plant: Master The Skill Of Plant Identification Herbal Directory: Penn State Univ. Information on common herbs for cultivation and culinary purposes. Herbs are classified by their use - aromatic, cosmetic, culinary, decorative, dye, medicinal and ornamental. Important Disclaimer The information shared freely on these pages is meant for cultivation of the crops and for culinary use only. Other uses are simply noted, so that readers are aware that they exist. They should research these herbs on their own for risks, dosages, concerns, etc., particularly if these are intended for any medicinal treatments. Contact Michael Orzolek, Professor of Vegetable Crops The Herb directory was developed by Keppy Arnoldsen, Aimée Voisin and Jen Johnson under the guidance of Dr.

Wildflowers & Weeds: Learn To Identify Wildflowers With Botany In A Day Are Mushrooms the Solution to the Worldwide Bee Colony Collapse? Jefferey Jaxen, ContributorWaking Times As humanity becomes more conscious to the language of nature, it is clear that mushrooms in their many forms come in peace and are here to help. The uses, benefits, and applications of mushrooms currently seem to be limitless cutting across all industries, cultures, and modalities. Embraced by the medical community, gardeners, architects, spiritualist, religions and others, their boundaries are yet to be found. The intricate matrix of mushroom mycelium under our feet represents rebirth, rejuvenation, and regeneration. Presenting at the recent Bioneers Annual Conference, Paul Stamets gave bombshell evidence that there is hope for bees, colony collapse, and our entire ecosystem. It has also been confirmed in previous tests that fungicidal contamination reduces beneficial fungi in honey bee colonies. Of course there are many other benefits of mushrooms that go beyond bee-support. Additional Sources: Link.Springer About the Author

Ten Commandments of Butterfly Gardening Wildcrafting.net: Foraging Database, Edible & Medicinal Plants Free Wild Plant Identification eCourse You are out in the forest and looking at the glorious plant life surrounding you. Whether you are a beginner and have never identified one plant, or a Botany professor at a university, you might appreciate this refreshingly simple approach to plant identification. I remember lovingly (and sometimes screamingly) that my college classes in Systematic Botany required me to become acquainted with that local Washington Flora that we plant dorks call “Hitchcock and Cronquist”. In addition, my observation skills as an ethnobotanist were refined , foraging for wild foods, fibers and medicine. What will I need? A combination of actual need for sustenance, curiosity and simple observation skills are almost all you need to start with plant identification. Wherever you are in this journey, the following activities and tips will add some elegant tools to your already blooming botanical basket. Meet a Plant Approach the plant of your choice and find a place to start.

The Complete History of Monsanto, The World's Most Evil Corporation Hanzai E, Lost in the Bamboo ForestWaking Times Of all the mega-corps running amok, Monsanto has consistently outperformed its rivals, earning the crown as “most evil corporation on Earth!” Not content to simply rest upon its throne of death, atop a mountain of rotting corpses, it remains focused on newer, more scientifically innovative ways to harm the planet and its people. As true champions of evil, they won’t stop until…well, until they’re stopped! 1901: The company is founded by John Francis Queeny, a member of the Knights of Malta, a thirty year pharmaceutical veteran married to Olga Mendez Monsanto, for which Monsanto Chemical Works is named. Even then, the government knew saccharin was poisonous and sued to stop its manufacture but lost in court, thus opening the Monsanto Pandora’s Box to begin poisoning the world through the soft drink. “PCBs were considered an industrial wonder chemical, an oil that wouldn’t burn, impervious to degradation and had almost limitless applications.

TDG ~ Telling the Bees When David’s sister sent me this story yesterday, I immediately felt called to share it here. I was running out the door to give a presentation, though, so I made a mental note to post for later. While waiting on the porch for my ride, two notifications came through from a blog called “The Bees Knees,” linking to two pages on my own blog. OK, bees, you’ve got my attention, and I am now keeping my word by sharing the article and link back to the original. Telling the Bees posted by Shadows Bees figure largely in folklore although these days people are mostly uninterested in the old stories of how bees are an important part of our society. I started keeping bees about 25 years ago and knew nothing about it, but that didn’t halt my enthusiasm. A friend gave me more bees,( You must not buy them according to folklore),and I set up the hives again, and this time the father of another friend came to rob the hives for me. But what happened next convinced me like nothing else ever could.

Poisonous Plants Basics Plants are amazing creatures that produce many great benefits for human consumption. We get most of our medicines from plants, our foods and even our beauty products. Still, there are poisonous plants among the wild edible plants that people need to be aware of when it comes to consuming them. To be responsible foragers we should have a few basic pieces of knowledge in our pockets to stay safe. By being smart about plant harvesting and consumption, we need not be scared. So what are poisonous plants anyways? If you remember one simple fact, it will help you realize why plants produce certain compound to deter predators – PLANTS CANT RUN! If you were to accidentally chomp on a Skunk Cabbage you would become very familiar with oxalate crystals that are like needles that stab you all the way down! Besides defending themselves, plants also make poisonous or toxic substances as byproducts from their usual metabolic processes. Stay Calm and Act Fast. Know your plants and plant families!

Wild Medicinal Plants Archives | ETMarciniec.com Attention Wild Food Aficionados: Fall foraging forges forward, and by that alliteration I mean to say that foraging for wild food “has not yet ended” this fall, so don’t put away your scissors or your plastic knives or your bare hands just yet! Just yesterday I came across some fabulous fall dandelion greens in the Colorado high country despite its notoriously short growing season. They were growing amidst the deep, down-trodden grass at the base of willows lining an old mining road, and some were nearly as long as an arm! Up here, anywhere the miners and their mules once trod is a good place to look for dandelions. At the very least these early travelers toted the seeds along by accident. Continue reading Heads up, blog readers, especially those of you interested in wild edible plants–I have an exciting announcement to make! New Wild Food Girl site: What happens to the old content? In the meantime, thanks so much for reading and I hope to hear from you over at wildfoodgirl.com. -Erica ).

Sacred Lessons from the Bees, Honey Flows, and Honey Harvesting | The Druid's Garden I’ve been making the transition to Pennsylvania and to my new life here (I spoke of this transition in an earlier blog post). Sorry for the delay in a regular weekly post–I’m back on track now, and have many wonderful things to share with you in the coming weeks. Today I’m going to talk about bees and share photos of my first honey harvest. Bees moving to their new home in early May! I’ve now been a beekeeper for over a year, and I have begun to deeply resonate with the honeybee. Honeybees are the most amazing, gentle creatures–they make everything from the plants, are extremely hard working, and extremely fascinating. One of the decisions I made, in my transition from my 3 acre homestead to small-town renting (renting until I find my new land) was to keep my two beehives. Beekeeping Ethically I’ve become very vigilant about the protection of bees. Beekeeping class I gave recently! I see beekeeping as a partnership–I wouldn’t do anything to them that I wouldn’t do for myself or to my land.

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