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Wildflowers

Wildflowers

http://www.wild-flowers.com/

Related:  risullyBees, butterflies

Are Mushrooms the Solution to the Worldwide Bee Colony Collapse? Jefferey Jaxen, ContributorWaking Times As humanity becomes more conscious to the language of nature, it is clear that mushrooms in their many forms come in peace and are here to help. The uses, benefits, and applications of mushrooms currently seem to be limitless cutting across all industries, cultures, and modalities. Embraced by the medical community, gardeners, architects, spiritualist, religions and others, their boundaries are yet to be found. The intricate matrix of mushroom mycelium under our feet represents rebirth, rejuvenation, and regeneration.

Colony Collapse Disorder Is a Fraud: Pesticides Cause Bee Die-Offs Heidi Stevenson, Green Med InfoWaking Times Years ago, Gaia Health informed that bee dieoffs are a direct result of pesticide nerve agents called neonicotinoids. The term, Colony Collapse Disorder, is fraudulent, designed to direct attention from the known cause. Agribusiness, the poison manufacturers making death-producing pesticides, is the other face of Big Pharma. The massive bee die-off is not a great mystery. Colony Collapse Disorder is poisoning with a class of pesticides called neonicotinoids.

The Complete History of Monsanto, The World's Most Evil Corporation Hanzai E, Lost in the Bamboo ForestWaking Times Of all the mega-corps running amok, Monsanto has consistently outperformed its rivals, earning the crown as “most evil corporation on Earth!” Not content to simply rest upon its throne of death, atop a mountain of rotting corpses, it remains focused on newer, more scientifically innovative ways to harm the planet and its people. As true champions of evil, they won’t stop until…well, until they’re stopped! But what is Monsanto and how did they get to be so obscenely evil in the first place? Sacred Lessons from the Bees, Honey Flows, and Honey Harvesting I’ve been making the transition to Pennsylvania and to my new life here (I spoke of this transition in an earlier blog post). Sorry for the delay in a regular weekly post–I’m back on track now, and have many wonderful things to share with you in the coming weeks. Today I’m going to talk about bees and share photos of my first honey harvest.

TDG ~ Telling the Bees When David’s sister sent me this story yesterday, I immediately felt called to share it here. I was running out the door to give a presentation, though, so I made a mental note to post for later. While waiting on the porch for my ride, two notifications came through from a blog called “The Bees Knees,” linking to two pages on my own blog. Not only did “The Bees Knees” seem like a message, but the post itself was unusual even for that blogger: “I normally read Tyberonn’s posts on Spirit Library, but this is a link to Laura Bruno’s Blog (27 October article) that has this wonderful affirmation.”

How to Start a Vegetable Garden - Vegetable Garden Plans Even if you've never tried growing food, there are good reasons to sacrifice some of that green carpet for a starter bed. First, chances are you don't use your lawn as much as you think—how long has it been since you played Frisbee out there? Second, most turfgrass has a thirst that can only be satiated by overhead sprinklers, which lose a lot of water to evaporation and runoff; veggies, by contrast, can be watered by efficient drip irrigation. Then there's dealing with the weeds, the grubs, and the chemicals needed to keep that grass glossy. The Silence of the Hive A full hive with bees working What you quickly learn as a beekeeper is that the sound of the hive matters. When you first get into a hive, if the hive is in good health and has all of its needs met, hive is generally pretty quiet (I talk about the hive as a single organism, because that’s really what bees are: a single super organism.) Sometimes, a hive is louder when you arrive–the bees are fanning the hive with their wings to keep it cool, or they are beating their wings to generate heat in the winter to keep it warm (you don’t open the hive under 50 degrees). But in the absence of extreme hot or cold, a happy and healthy hive emits only a very soft sound, discernible only up close when you open it. Beehives always have some buzzing in them–the bees move around, beat their wings, and go about tending their young and storing away pollen and honey.

gardening Planting Plant 2 seeds per small starting pot, or scatter seeds across the top of the mix in a seed tray. Lightly tamp them in place and cover them with more mix to the recommended depth given on the seed packet. Moisten the soil on top but don’t overwater it. Label the container or tray with the plant name and planting date. Keep Bees, Naturally! If you’d like to benefit your garden and community and offer a treat to your taste buds, consider trying your hand at natural beekeeping in your own backyard. As honeybees gather pollen and nectar to make 50 pounds or more of pure, wild honey per hive, they pollinate crops nearby — and up to four miles away. This pollination is essential for good yields for some flowering crops. Best of all, honeybees require only simple management once the hives are up and running. Kim Flottum, editor of Bee Culture Magazine, says that keeping bees takes “more effort than for your cat, but less than your dog.”

Windowsill Sprouting my way through the Winter. My orchids are dark speckled and bruised from the cold. The flowery Lantana shrubs are like coarse twine unraveled in a pile on the ground. The tall ornamental grasses, which I love for their swaying grace, stand in stiff bunches like little scarecrows scattered across the lawn. My herbs…oh, let’s not even go there (I think thyme and cilantro are barely holding on). Then there’s the pile of dead and crispy Christmas trees strewn around the fire pit. We like to collect the discarded trees at the end of the season and use them for firewood throughout the winter, but right now, as I look out across the pathetic winter landscape of our backyard, they only add to the overall state of things.

Grow Your Own Bee Garden: 7 Tips for a Bee-Friendly Habitat Planting a bee garden is becoming increasingly important as across our planet, bees are thought to be suffering increased stress as a result of global warming, and the effect that this has on flowering times and nectar availability. It will take many generations of bees to evolve into stronger colonies able to deal with the change in climate. We depend on the work of bees and other insects more than most of us realise; almost 70% of the food we consume relies on pollination from insects, and bees are a critical part of this army of fertilizers. Growing Tomatoes, How to Grow Tomatoes, Planting Tomatoes Back in the 80’s when I started growing tomatoes organically, the only way to get good tomatoes was to grow your own. Now you can get good tomatoes in season at farmers markets and high-end supermarkets, but they still don’t come close to tomatoes you can grow in your back yard, if you know how to grow tomatoes. The first time you tuck into a sun-warmed, vine-ripened tomato, you’ll be hooked. Tomatoes need a long growing season, 6-12 hours of sun a day, and summer heat to set and ripen fruit.

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