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Common Core in Action: 10 Visual Literacy Strategies

Common Core in Action: 10 Visual Literacy Strategies
Do you wish your students could better understand and critique the images that saturate their waking life? That's the purpose of visual literacy (VL), to explicitly teach a collection of competencies that will help students think through, think about and think with pictures. Standards Support Visual Literacy Instruction Visual literacy is a staple of 21st century skills, which state that learners must "demonstrate the ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate and understand information presented through visible actions, objects and symbols, natural or man-made." Putting aside the imperative to teach students how to create meaningful images, the ability to read images is reflected in the following standards. Common Core State Standards (CCSS) CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7: "Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos or maps) with other information in print and digital texts." How to Teach Visual Literacy: Visual Thinking Routines Think-Alouds Asking the 4WS

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/ccia-10-visual-literacy-strategies-todd-finley

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The “All-Time” Best Online Learning Games I’ve been posting annual lists of the The Best Online Learning Games for a number of years. I thought it would be useful for readers, my students, and me to review them all and identify my choices for the “all-time” best ones. I’ve begun creating a number of these “All-Time” Best list, with The “All-Time” Best Ways To Create Online Content Easily & Quickly being the first ; The “All-Time” Best Web 2.0 Applications For Education second; and The “All-Time” Best Videos For Educators third.

Teaching Visual Literacy to Students Visual literacy is a multi-faceted subject matter, and faculty wishing to include images in their curriculum can quickly find themselves overwhelmed by the prospect of addressing visual literacy. For an introduction to the topic visit The Basics of Visual Literacy: Form, Context and Content. The following tools are intended to help faculty customize their curricula to incorporate visual literacy in ways that suit their individual instructional needs. Some faculty may want to teach visual literacy as a one-time in- or out-of-class activity. The First 5s with iPads Author's Note: This post expands on ideas that I originally shared last year on Edutopia. With the start of school approaching and the looming expectation of incorporating iPads into the curriculum becoming a reality, the big question many educators are asking is: "Where should I begin?" Last year, I wrote about 5 Steps for the First 5 Days. However, what about the five days after that? It can seem daunting to envision a year's worth of activities with iPads, but when taken in small chunks, it doesn't need to be intimidating.

ACRL Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Approved by the ACRL Board of Directors, October 2011 Introduction The importance of images and visual media in contemporary culture is changing what it means to be literate in the 21st century. Today's society is highly visual, and visual imagery is no longer supplemental to other forms of information. Greek Mythology Greek mythology, as in other ancient cultures, was used as a means to explain the environment in which humankind lived, the natural phenomena they witnessed and the passing of time through the days, months, and seasons. Myths were also intricately connected to religion in the Greek world and explained the origin and lives of the gods, where humanity had come from and where it was going after death, and gave advice on the best way to lead a happy life. Finally, myths were used to re-tell historical events so that people could maintain contact with their ancestors, the wars they fought, and the places they explored.

Three Tips for Structuring Classroom Blogging Projects Posted by Bill Ferriter on Tuesday, 09/17/2013 In preparation for three different Teaching the iGeneration workshops I'll be delivering in October, I'm pulling together a ton of content for structuring classroom blogging projects. I thought Radical Nation might benefit from some of the content, too. Here are three tips that I always recommend to teachers interested in blogging with kids: Tip 1 - Create ONE Topic-Focused Classroom Blog A lesson that session presenter Bill Ferriter learned early in his work with blogs is that they are far more vibrant -- and attract far more attention -- when they are updated regularly.

Teaching History Resources - Historic Newspapers Looking after the world’s largest private archive of original newspapers means that we’re extremely passionate about history. This is why we decided to pick out interesting coverage from historical dates of significance so that others could learn about the past, as it was reported at the time! Our free teaching packs are available in order to help students discover the cause and consequence of historical events. 50 Incredibly Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language - Teaching a new language to non-native speakers may be one of the most challenging educational jobs out there, so ELL teachers can use all of the help they can get! Thankfully, many excellent resources for ELL and ESL exist online, from full-service websites to reference tools and communities, all designed to make the task of educating ELL students just a little bit easier and more effective. We’ve scoured the Internet to share 50 of the best of these resources, and we hope you’ll find lots of valuable content and tools through these incredibly useful links for ELL educators. Websites

Visual Rhetoric This section of the OWL discusses the use of rhetorical theory and rhetoric as it relates to visuals and design. "Visual rhetoric" has been used to mean anything from the use of images as argument, to the arrangement of elements on a page for rhetorical effect, to the use of typography (fonts), and more. While we cannot hope to cover these and many other topics in depth in this resource, it will be possible for us to look at some of the common visual rhetoric problems encountered by student writers: the text elements of a page (including font choices), the use of visuals (including photographs, illustrations, and charts and graphs), and the role of overall design in composing a page rhetorically. Note: Much of the current use of "visual rhetoric" is directed at analyzing images and other visuals that already exist.

The 4 essentials of a successful Genius Hour Genius Hour projects may be open ended, but there are still some ground rules What are you passionate about? What do you want to do more than anything in the world? The Learning Revolution: It’s Not About Education Image: Tony Crider/Flickr The education system is changing. Established teaching methodologies are reaching their limits in most developed countries.

Digital Activities For Visual Literacy Visual literacy is the ability to construct meaning from or communicate meaning through information presented in the form of an image. While it may seem like this could only be applicable to the elementary student, visual literacy pervades all subject areas, disciplines, and grade levels in schools. From identifying patterns, to understanding modern art, to interpreting and creating graphs, visual literacy is one of the most widely important skills students should develop while in K-12 schools. Teaching and practicing visual literacy, as well as making students’ thinking visible to others, has never been easier. Many activities and methodologies exist for incorporating visual literacy and making thinking visible in the classroom, but now mobile apps are able to help support the practices of visual literacy and visible thinking even more. If you’re new to visual literacy or visible thinking, there are plenty of resources out there online to get you familiarized.

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