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The 5 Laws of Content Curation

The 5 Laws of Content Curation
The laws of content curation, should you break them and pay the fine or should you stay legal? Let’s breakdown these really good series of laws on content curation from Steven Rosenbaum: The First Law: People don’t want more content, they want less. We’re overwhelmed in raw, unfiltered, context-free data. Humans want it to stop. This first law breaks down the core need of content curation. The Second Law: Curators come in three shapes. This is really good insight but one thing left unspoken is you can be one or all of these “shape of curators”. The Third Law: Curation isn’t a hobby, it’s both a profession and a calling. This is another really good point. The Fourth Law: Curation requires technology and tools to find, filter, and validate content at the speed of the real-time web. This is a big one. This is spot on and is one of the biggest mistakes early curators make. Please don’t take my commentary as these “laws” aren’t great, they are. See full story on thevideoink.com

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7 Qualities of Highly Effective Content Curators Every time I visit the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City, I see something I’ve never seen before. In fact, t’s considered the most influential museum of modern art in the world. With that in mind, meet Klaus Biesenbach. Klaus holds the title “Chief Curator at Large” at MoMA. If you’ve visited the MoMA and walked away impressed (like I have), Klaus has a lot to do with that.

Is Your Content Curation Ethical? A 10-Step Checklist Curation itself is nothing new — museums have used art curators for centuries — but online content curation is still in its early stages. The early years of the internet were like the “Wild West,” and because it was so new, there were few ethical or legal guidelines to police behavior. With new legislation governing online copyright and commerce, that’s all changed. What is Content Curation? What is Content Curation? Content Curation is the act of discovering, gathering, and presenting digital content that surrounds specific subject matter. Though it is still considered a "buzz word" by many in the content world, content curation is now becoming a marketing staple for many companies with a successful online presence. Unlike content marketing, content curation does not include generating content, but instead, amassing content from a variety of sources, and delivering it in an organized fashion. For instance, a content curator is not necessarily responsible for creating new content, but instead, for finding relevant content pertaining to a specific category and funneling this information to readers in a mash-up style.

26 Free (or Free-to-Try) Content Curation Tools Content is still king, but it isn't always practical or cost effective for marketers to produce brand-new, meaty, thought-leadership level content pieces on a regular basis. That's where curating content can come in handy. Content curation offers a nearly limitless method of fueling your inbound marketing efforts.

The 100 best free fonts We've scoured the web to present you with a fine and varied selection of free fonts. Including scripts, serifs, and a range of ligatures, these fonts will give you greater flexibility in your designs, and add to your arsenal of design tools. This list represents the 100 best free fonts we've found in a variety of styles. However, for specialist fonts that won't cost you a penny, read these: Defining Digital Content Curation “Content curation” is one of those phrases that gets repeated ad naseum without much thought about what it actually means or what role it plays in our digital lives. It’s a term that is widely used, yet the definition (at least in the social media marketing sense) is murky and unspecific. Let’s define what digital content curation really is and what it’s not, and how we can begin to think about this term a little differently. The distribution of content What I believe people are referring to when they use the term content curation, is actually the distribution of content from various sources via social media. That’s not wrong per se but, that’s not even close to the whole story either.

Content Curation: Beyond the Institutional Repository and Library Archives - Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians If you are an academic librarian, you have been hearing about Data Curation, Content Curation, Information Curation or Digital Curation for years. And the terms can be applied in several different ways. There are the curation activities surrounding purchased library materials and the curation of faculty and student items (like theses and dissertations for example). Archivists have been intimately involved with all sorts of curation activities since archives existed, and were early adopters of digital curation and finding aids for the items they maintained. Most recently, Data Curation has been in the forefront of librarian discussions in response to government mandates to make research information widely available; first with the medical field, and more recently with the National Science Foundation requirements for data curation plans in all NSF grants. Clay Shirky (www.shirky.com) suggests that “[the problem] is not information overload.

The 5 Models Of Content Curation Curation has always been an underrated form of creation. The Getty Center in Los Angeles is one of the most frequently visited museums in America – and started as a private art collection from one man (J. Paul Getty) who had a passion for art. Aside from a few well known examples like this one, however, the term curation has rarely been used outside of the world of art … until now. One of the hottest trends in social media right now is content curation – thanks in no small part to the leading efforts of several thought leaders actively promoting the idea.

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