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10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom

10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom
10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom by Kelly Walsh, emergingedtech.com What have you heard about the flipped classroom? That it’s just the latest education fad? That it only works for certain academic subjects? It’s not uncommon to come across references in the web media to poorly informed and misconstrued ideas like these. Following are 10 of the most common erroneous ideas about flipped teaching and learning that you may come across, and a brief explanation of why each of them is misinformed. 1. Flipped instruction, a.k.a. the flipped classroom, is an evolution of the phrase “reverse instruction”, which first appeared in print in 20001. 2. As attested to above, the concept of was formally birthed about a decade and a half ago and has been gaining steam ever since. 3. One of the main things I try to clear up right away when I introduce flipped instruction to teachers is that they have to flip all or most of their content. 4. This just doesn’t make sense. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

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Student Engagement in a Flipped Classroom Engaging In Isolation: Student Engagement in a Flipped Classroom by Tridib Roy Chowdhury, Senior Director, Products, Adobe Systems This is part 2 of the series “Responsive Teaching For A Changing World,” a 3-part series is sponsored by Adobe Presenter 9. The Flipped Classroom model allows every student to learn at their own pace, with the rewind button of online content being used frequently as students navigate digital courses. Combined with the own-place, own-time nature of eLearning, this means students now consume content in a very asynchronous manner.

What 'They' Forgot to Tell You When Flipping the Classroom What 'They' Forgot to Tell You When Flipping the Classroom The “Flipped Classroom”, it’s what everyone is talking about and for good reason. I jumped into this flipped classroom with two feet, full steam ahead. I thought, “Here is the answer to my problems of students missing class due to illness, sports or school assemblies.” I reasoned, “I’ll get more teaching time and then I can do the activities with my students that will help them really ‘get’ the concepts they need to master this topic”.

The Great Flipped Classroom Debate: Advantages and Disadvantages The Great Flipped Classroom Debate: Advantages and Disadvantages Flipped Classroom (Photo credit: ransomtech) Perhaps the only thing in the field of education which never changes…is the fact that it is always changing! Three Good Tools for Building Flipped Lessons That Include Assessment Tools In the right setting the flipped classroom model can work well for some teachers and students. I recently received an email from a reader who was looking for a recommendation for a tool would enable her to add an assessment aspect to her flipped lesson. Here are some tools that can accomplish that goal. The Best Posts On The “Flipped Classroom” Idea Check out my two-part Education Week Teacher series on the flipped classroom here I’m a bit wary/skeptical about whole “Flipped Classroom” idea and how it works in practice. Diana Laufenberg spoke for me, also, in some of her tweets about the concept: But I’m still open to learning, and I invite your suggestions for additions to list. In the meantime, though, here are some posts that some of my questions more eloquently than I could: The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con is by Mary Beth Hertz and appeared in Edutopia.

10 Characteristics Of A Highly Effective Learning Environment 10 Characteristics Of A Highly Effective Learning Environment by Terry Heick Wherever we are, we’d all like to think our classrooms are “intellectually active” places. Progressive learning (like our 21st Century Model, for example) environments. Highly effective and conducive to student-centered learning. Flipped classrooms: Can they help students learn? Photo by Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Thinkstock This article is part of Future Tense, which is a partnership of Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University. On Wednesday, April 30, Future Tense will host an event in Washington, D.C., on technology and the future of higher education.

The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. They had a lot of students that regularly missed class and saw an opportunity to make sure that missing class didn’t mean missing out on the lessons. Once students had the option of reviewing the lessons at home, the teachers quickly realized the shift opened up additional time in class for more productive, interactive activities than the lectures they’d been giving. And voila: a movement began.

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