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The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right

The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right
It’s no secret that I’m a huge fan of Atul Gawande. A reader recently pointed out that I hadn’t covered his most recent book, The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right. I had only covered an interesting subset of the book—why we fail. In this post, we’ll take a quick look at some other parts of the book. To put us in the proper context, we’re smart. Not scary smart but smart enough. the volume and complexity of what we know has exceeded our individual ability to deliver its benefits correctly, safely, or reliably. To overcome this we need a strategy. In response to increasing complexity we’ve become more specialized. The response of the medical profession, like most others, is to move from specialization to super-specialization. Modern professions, like medicine, with their dazzling successes and spectacular failures, pose a significant: challenge: “What do you do when expertise is not enough? The origins of the checklist. Of course everyone wanted to know what had happened.

http://www.farnamstreetblog.com/2014/02/the-checklist-manifesto/

Related:  Time ManagementPersonal OrganizationORGANIZATION & PRODUCTIVITY & TO DO LISTS

10 Time Management Tips That Work Chances are good that, at some time in your life, you've taken a time management class, read about it in books, and tried to use an electronic or paper-based day planner to organize, prioritize and schedule your day. "Why, with this knowledge and these gadgets," you may ask, "do I still feel like I can't get everything done I need to?" The answer is simple. A Formula to Stop You from Overcommitting Your Time When I dive into time coaching clients’ schedules, I consistently discover that people misdiagnose themselves as having a “productivity” problem when, in fact, their bigger issue is an overcommitment problem. When they have committed to more external projects and personal goals and obligations than they have hours for in the day, they feel the massive weight of time debt. One of my coaching clients suffered from a huge amount of false guilt until he realized he had the unrealistic expectation that he could fit 160 hours of tasks into a 40-hour workweek.

8 free (or almost free) tools to organize your life You can write all the to-do lists you want, but if you keep losing those scraps of paper, they’re not much help. So we rounded up eight easy ways to move your lists beyond pen and paper. Each website meets our requirements for contact-info disclosure and customer service, and all have free apps so that you can go mobile. Best for list haters: Keep.Google.com Think of this as the anti-list; it can look more like a Pinterest board than a roster of chores. Need to run errands tomorrow?

Is Poor Time Management Limiting Your Potential? Are you clueless about how your time management—or lack thereof—has limited your success? As a time coach, I understand the importance of positive thinking and celebrating incremental improvement. But I also know that many people walk around refusing to admit to themselves what is obvious to everyone else: their lack of control of their time is limiting their creative potential. This denial of facts may provide some short-term emotional comfort. But in the long-run this mindset leaves you a victim of your circumstances because you’re unable to address what you could do to make your future different than your past.

Why We Humblebrag About Being Busy We have a problem—and the odd thing is we not only know about it, we’re celebrating it. Just today, someone boasted to me that she was so busy she’s averaged four hours of sleep a night for the last two weeks. She wasn’t complaining; she was proud of the fact. She is not alone. Why are typically rational people so irrational in their behavior?

How to Finish Your Work, One Bite at a Time “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.” If you’ve ever ran more than a few miles, you probably understand why you need to pace yourself. The Envision Film - A Simple Visualization Practice Here’s a quick technique you can add to your productivity toolkit. I call it the envision film and it’s a very simple visualization technique. If you’re unfamiliar with the concept of visualization, it’s where you close your eyes and imagine a certain outcome you desire. When you can imagine what you want to do or have, you’re more likely get what you want. I know it sounds a bit woo-woo but visualization techniques are becoming more mainstream as more people discover the power of this simple practice. For example, Olympic athletes use visualizations to improve their performance and there are books written about it such as Psycho-Cybernetics (which we can recommend).

This Note-Taking System Turns You Into An Efficiency Expert Note-taking is a skill not easily acquired. In the hands of an artist, designer, or Hollywood serial killer (à la Seven’s John Doe), an idea-crammed notebook can even become a rarified, and in the case of the latter, creepy, object all on its own. Too often, however, the ability to take comprehensive, ruminative, or even attractive notes and sketches is conflated with simply buying a stylish book of paper, say from Moleskine or Field Notes. Wrong. The most important step to keeping a great notebook is organization. Course of Actions - Task Flow Mapping Your Day One of the things I’ve found when listing out tasks and actions, is the difficulty of organizing a list into a logical flow. Most of my day is filled with tasks that I need or want to complete in a specific order, and I wanted a simple way to map out the flow of my day. When I set out to find a way to do this, I had several criteria in mind: It had to be simple – I didn’t want a lot of options or stuff to fill in.

TEDx: Making ideas happen…or how Scott Belsky helped me organize my room on the Behance Team Blog We get a lot of emails from folks around the world who tell us how our founder Scott Belsky’s book “Making Ideas Happen,” or the tools Behance provides has helped them push a project forward, get inspired to revisit goals, or make time for that side project they’ve been neglecting. But here’s one we’ve never heard before: “Scott Belsky helped me organize my room.” The folks over at TEDx Napoli wrote this great blog post that breaks downy he process of cleaning a room into some key principles learned from “Making Ideas Happen:” 1) Capture Actions: a task needs to be broken down into concrete actions, so “organize a room” is too abstract. Instead, the writer identified tasks like: make a bed, store dirty clothes in laundry basket, etc. 2) Customize your Work Process: Find ways that will be effective in getting you to do the things you usually have trouble getting done – for example, folding clothes.

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