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Plagiarism Scavenger Hunt

Plagiarism Scavenger Hunt
Examples: I would be plagiarizing if I were to write an essay about the walrus and said: The walrus' other characteristic features are equally useful. As their favorite meals, particularly shellfish, are found near the dark ocean floor, walruses use their extremely sensitive whiskers, called mustacial vibrissae, as detection devices. As their favorite meals, particularly shellfish, are found near the dark ocean floor, walruses use their extremely sensitive whiskers, called mustacial vibrissae, as detection devices. The walrus' other characteristic features are equally useful. Why is this plagiarism? #1 is an example of plagiarism because I took the sentences directly from this National Geographic Website. Remember, even though you learned from the walrus site and wrote sentences in your own words, the information still does not belong to you! How do I avoid plagiarism? Plagiarism Scavenger Hunt Activity The Plagiarism Scavenger Hunt assignment will teach you more about plagiarism.

http://edtech2.boisestate.edu/jenniferharris2/502/scavenger.html

Related:  Ethical Use in the 21st CenturyEthical Use of InformationPlagiarismEthical Use of Information for Elementary studentsericaosher

Plagiarism What is Plagiarism and Why is it Important? In college courses, we are continually engaged with other people’s ideas: we read them in texts, hear them in lecture, discuss them in class, and incorporate them into our own writing. As a result, it is very important that we give credit where it is due. Plagiarism is using others’ ideas and words without clearly acknowledging the source of that information.

Library Patch: Citing Sources with Kids As a librarian, one of my biggest challenges is getting our elementary kids to cite their sources. Writing out a whole annotation is next to impossible for those who are just beginning to get a handle on reading and writing. However, it is so important!! 8 ways to prevent cheating in the digital age For as long as there has been school, there has been cheating. And in many ways, the advent of the digital age has made plagiarism and stealing answers even easier. Some teachers will tell you that trying to prevent cheating is an exercise in futility. While it’s true that you can’t police all students at every turn, you can put some techniques and digital tools in place to help curtail problems while embracing collaboration. Here are eight tried and true ideas for keeping cheating to a minimum: 1.

Musings from the Middle School: Summarizing, Paraphrasing, and Quoting This year, I decided to teach this skill over a few days at the beginning of the year. I've never taught it like this before. I usually wait until I move into nonfiction and argument writing and then I mention the difference in the three, but I never teach it as its own lesson. However, this year I thought maybe knowing how to do each of these early on would help as we start working on answering open-ended questions. I was inspired by this post over at The Creative Apple. I loved her anchor chart, which I believe she borrowed from this blog. Plagiarism Checker Advertisement To use this plagiarism checker, please copy and paste your content in the box below, and then click on the big green button that says “Check Plagiarism!” then sit back and watch as your article is scanned for duplicated content. Copy and paste your text below: 1 2 3 4 5 ⇐ Select a sample text Limit: 1000 Words per Search Total Words: 0

Taking the Mystery Out of Copyright skip navigation Library of Congress Teachers Suggestions enabled. Excellent Video Clips on Plagiarism to Share with Your Students 1- What is Plagiarism 2- A Quick Guide to Plagiarism 3- Plagiarism: a film by Murdokh 4- Avoid Plagiarism in Research papers with paraphrases and quotations 5- Before he cheats: A teacher parody Summarizing, Paraphrasing, and Quoting Texts We are SO close to being done with our nonfiction unit, and I'm looking forward to jumping back in to novel studies. My students are slowly growing to love (okay, maybe like is still a better word) informational text, and that was truly one of my main goals in all of this. Last week, we did a brief review of the difference between summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting texts. I should have done this a long time ago!

Plagiarism Prevention More from For Students Studying Abroad: Step-by-Step Deciding to Studying Abroad Why Study Abroad?

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