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Five Pedagogical Practices to Improve Your Online Course

Five Pedagogical Practices to Improve Your Online Course
Written by: Rob KellyPublished On: February 8, 2014 Because online courses have fewer opportunities for the spontaneous, real-time exchanges of the face-to-face classroom, online instruction requires a deliberate approach to design and facilitation. As Bethany Simunich says, “Online, learning doesn’t happen by chance.” In an interview with Online Classroom, Simunich, associate director of online learning at Kent State University, offered the following techniques to improve an online course: 1. Using a backward design approach, Simunich has instructors consider what types of activities will enable students to demonstrate that they have achieved the course’s learning outcomes. Depending on those outcomes, the best approach might be an individual assignment or one that involves collaboration in small or large groups. 2. The instructor needs to design the discussion to give students a way to enter the conversation. What is the purpose of this discussion? 3. 4. 5. Related:  E-Learning Instructional DesigneLearningelearning

Articulate Storyline E-Learning Demos & Training Examples Sales Orientation Sales Orientation by ThinkingKap Learning Solutions, Inc. View the Articulate Storyline example (See more examples in the Articulate Storyline showcase) View the interactive example → Periodic Table Periodic Table by Phil Mayor, Elearning Laboratory View the Articulate Storyline example (See more examples in the Articulate Storyline showcase) View the interactive example → U.S. U.S. View the interactive example →

Top 10 eLearning Content Development Companies for 2014 The Top 10 eLearning content development companies for 2014 were selected based on the following 7 criteria: eLearning Content Development QualityeLearning ExpertiseeLearning Industry InnovationeLearning Company’s Economical Growth PotentialCustomer RetentionEmployee TurnoverCompany’s Social Responsibility Nonetheless, it is important to highlight that you need to make further your own research in order to choose the company that will better serve your needs and preferences. Hence, I suggest you to visit and review the official sites of each eLearning content development company to get the full picture of the Top 10 eLearning Content Development Companies’ services. 1. SweetRush is about 100 people strong, been in business since 2001, and, similar to most companies in the industry, is comprised of instructional designers (of various flavors), creative multimedia developers, project and program managers, solution architects, and engineers. 2. 3. 4. 5. 20 years ago Michael W. Michael W. 6.

7 Habits Of Highly-Effective Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology 7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology by TeachThought Staff Ed note: This post has been updated with an updated visual from Sylvia Duckworth, who took our graphic from alwaysprepped.com (now getalma) post and created the above visual. It is also sporting a new title, as the “habits of” is a trademarked term. In most ways, teachers that use technology in the classroom aren’t much different than those that don’t. Any teacher worth their salt assesses, and then revises planned instruction based on data from those assessments. They manage their classroom in a way that works for them, create a positive learning environment, and (great teachers especially) collaborate with a variety of stakeholders to make sure every humanly possible attempt is made to meet all students need. They care about learning more than tools, people more than curriculum, and questions more than answers. 7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

AR1_LearningGoalsTeacherSelfAssessment_Checklist Ten Best Practices for Teaching Online J. V. Boettcher, Ph.D. Designing for Learning 2006 - 2013 Minor revisions May 2011 Our knowledge about what works well in online teaching and learning is growing rapidly and that is very good news. Here are ten best practices for anyone just getting started in the online environment. Best Practice 1: Be Present at the Course Site Liberal use of a faculty's use of communication tools such as announcements, discussion board postings, and forums communicate to the students that the faculty member cares about who they are, cares about their questions and concerns, and is generally "present" to do the mentoring and challenging that teaching is all about. When faculty actively interact and engage students in a face-to-face classroom, the class develops as a learning community, developing intellectual and personal bonds. We have learned to quantify what it means to "be present." Note: Students who feel abandoned or who feel alone may even post questions, such as "Is anybody there?" References

Flip the Perspective for Effective Course Design You’re the site safety manager and arrive at company headquarters to find the workplace in disarray. Tables are knocked over, the place is littered with documents, and your cubicle is covered in slime. And you can’t find anyone in the building. Footage from the security cameras reveal that the site’s been overrun by aliens and all of the staff has been abducted. Create a Flipped Perspective Goofy scenario? It’s important that the courses we build are relevant and meaningful. The objective wasn’t to teach CPR. And that’s the key point: if the situational content is too close to the real-world they may not be able to see past the content and focus on the real learning objectives. Tips on Flipped Perspective If you do change the content around, here are a few basic considerations: Changing perspective exposes different opportunities. Alien abductions may not happen (or maybe they do); but if they did the process for disaster recovery is probably similar to that of other incidents.

Welcome to Teaching Media - TEACHING MEDIA Edutech for Teachers » Tech Tip of the Week Gooru: Science & Math Resources February7 Resource: Gooru is new service whose mission is to provide teachers and students with a variety of multimedia resources – videos, diagrams, interactive displays, documents and quizzes – related to 5th–12th grade science and math topics. By creating a Gooru account, one has access to over 50,000 resources categorized into a variety of subject areas: earth science, biology, chemistry, geometry, and algebra to name a few. Once a topic is selected, Gooru provides the user with a list of materials according to media type (digital text, interactive games, images, video, etc.) that can be integrated into lessons, activities and/or projects. In addition to being able to search the Gooru resources by keyword, users can browse the Resource Library or check out Gooru favorites in the “Featured Resources” section as well. Tech Tip of the Week Archives February3 Oolone: Visual Search Engine February2 Example of King Tut Search Results via Oolone:

The Ten eLearning Commandments [Infographic] Malcolm Gladwell, author of ‘Outliers’ says that to truly master something takes 10,000 hours of practice. That’s a long time. But while Gladwell is probably not too far off the mark, we’d add one small caveat: 10,000 hours of practicing the right way, with the right foundations. So we’ve put together the 10 commandments eLearning professionals must follow to see their courses be a success. Take these rules, incorporate them into your eLearning, and get busy mastering your craft. Commandment #1: Thou Shalt Put the Learner On a Pedestal Now, that doesn’t just mean fancy graphics and cool technology; it’s about making the eLearning experience bespoke, unique, and focused for the learner. Ensure that your learner feels in control and well-oriented. While UX has been around for a while now, the advent of responsive eLearning has brought it back into the public eye. This means communicability, aesthetics, and navigability are the primary concern (after of course, the learning material). Ms.

Simple Way to Write eLearning Quiz Questions There you are, sitting at your desk, trying to finish your eLearning course. You only have one more thing to do before it gets reviewed. Write a few quiz questions. The problem is that you are stuck. You don’t know where to start, so you scroll through each page of your course looking for questions to ask. You find a slide, write a quiz question, and then skip a few more slides looking for the next topic. “Am I skipping important material to test?” These are common questions among eLearning designers, and they can be easily solved with a simple system for writing quiz questions. Here’s what you do. Cover Each Learning Objective Start by putting all of your learning objectives in one place. Write two to five quiz questions for each learning objective. It’s as simple as that. Just go down the list and create a few questions on each. Some designers like to write questions before writing course content believing it helps them write better content and activities. Mix up the Question Type

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