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Tiny Earthen Home Dome

Tiny Earthen Home Dome
Project led by: Jeffrey Location: Aprovecho, Cottage Grove, OR Date: September 2011 – April 2012 Reclaimed timber ceiling feature, surrounded by earthen plaster The project began with an idea: by reducing the size of a house, we actually increase the space we live in. Having a smaller home forces us outside and into nature. My aim was to make a well built cabin cheaply; using material destined for the landfill as much as possible.I feel that much of the western world has become a ‘throw-away’ society. No longer do we repair our belongings when they wear out or break, but instead we thrown them away and buy new ones. I wanted the cabin to be small, with room enough for only a bed, desk and small wood stove for winter heat. I decided on the geodesic dome as the shape for my cabin. To begin the project I constructed a nine-foot, ten sided deck using wood salvaged from a torn down shed and concrete pier blocks that were found on site. the skeleton of the dome

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Colorado Living Dome A geodesic dome outfitted for full-time living in Colorado. Dome by DomeGuys International. The Playhouse - Tiny House Project led by: Chris Foraker Location: Aprovecho, Cottage Grove, OR Date: August 2011 – July 2012 This project was the main build in Aprovecho’s ‘Sustainable Shelter Series’. The playhouse is 150 square feet, small enough to avoid costly permits in Oregon. It features a variety of different natural building materials and techniques to both educate and be a model of what is possible. I had the pleasure of working on this structure for the best part of a year.

Build A Log Cabin For $100 Living in a cozy little cabin nestled in the woods is part and parcel of the classic Thoreau-inspired lifestyle most folks dream of now and then. But the romantic vision of log-home life is shattered — for many people — by the sheer cost of such structures, which can be as high as that of equivalent conventional homes. That doesn't have to be the case, however. My wife and I kept down the cash outlay for our “Walden” by gathering most of the materials from the land where our house was to stand, and then building it ourselves, using only hand tools. As a result, our small home cost us only about $100 to construct … and the project was so simple that we’re convinced anyone with access to a few basic implements and a good supply of timber could build a log cabin too. First Steps

Mushroom Dome Cabin Tiny cabin with geodesic dome roof in Aptos, CA. Photos by Morgan. Stay in it here. How To Pack A Whole Lot Of Living In 221 sq ft One of the key limitations in the design of many tiny houses is the fact that they have to be built on trailer chassis. Many zoning bylaws have minimum building sizes to keep the riffraff out and the property taxes up; many building codes have minimum room sizes and other rules that make it very hard to build small. By having wheels, it becomes a recreational vehicle and it can sneak under a lot of radars. But it's really tough to design a decent space in an 8'-6" wide (exterior dimensions!) space.

Build This Cozy Cabin For Under $4,000 Related Content Build a Houseboat Here is a plan for how to build your own floating cabin, "The Live Aboard Houseboat." Rays of early-morning sunlight gently peek through the windows, easing you awake. Looking down from the sleeping loft, you see everything you need: a pine table; a box piled with hardwood, split and ready for the woodstove; and a compact kitchen in the corner. This is the cabin dream.

A DIY Geodesic Dome Greenhouse - A DIY Geodesic Dome Greenhouse Project Introduction In early 2011, I built a geodesic dome greenhouse in my garden in Norfolk. I recorded the process of designing and building it in a diary-style as I went along, as much for my own record as for publication to others. Now (May 2011) I notice that the blog is getting a trickle of hits, a few each day, so I'm adding this introduction.

Student Constructs Complete Home Of 75 ft² 552 Flares Twitter 12 Facebook 335 Reddit 1 StumbleUpon 198 LinkedIn 2 inShare2 Google+ 4 552 Flares × There’s a kitchen, bathroom, laundry room, and even a patio Since 2000, China’s cities have expanded at an average rate of 10% annually. It is estimated that China’s urban population will increase by 400 million people by 2025, when its cities will house a combined population of over one billion. That limitations can actually boost creativity is shown by the Chinese architecture student who designed this 75 ft² wooden house (23 m²)

8 Survival Tips For Your Tiny House Build Having been involved in several construction projects over the last 20 years, I am deeply familiar with the physical and emotional process that happens when building. I liken it to the process of being in labor, something I have experienced twice being a mother of two. As it is with labor, just because I have been through it before doesn’t mean that I have figured it out and that I won’t go through many of the same challenges and frustrations that I have experienced before.

Tensile structure Most tensile structures are supported by some form of compression or bending elements, such as masts (as in The O2, formerly the Millennium Dome), compression rings or beams. A tensile membrane structure is most often used as a roof, as they can economically and attractively span large distances. History[edit] This form of construction has only become more rigorously analyzed and widespread in large structures in the latter part of the twentieth century. Tensile structures have long been used in tents, where the guy ropes and tent poles provide pre-tension to the fabric and allow it to withstand loads. Russian engineer Vladimir Shukhov was one of the first to develop practical calculations of stresses and deformations of tensile structures, shells and membranes.

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