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The Writers Helpers

The Writers Helpers
Related:  Books, Writing and WritersTips

Unique Plots 15 Habits That Will Make You A Better Writer Writing is one of the great joys of life, but it can also be difficult, tedious, and full of frustration. Luckily, there are some specific things you can do to become a better writer. Read on for 15 habits that will make you a better writer, today. 1. If you wait until you feel 100%, you may never start. 2. It’s tempting to want to sound more professional or intellectual in your writing, but simplicity wins every time. 3. Writing an outline or rough dot points can only take you so far. 4. Your writing will never be perfect, so striving for perfection is a fruitless task. 5. Imagine your ideal reader and write to him or her. 6. Avoid overwriting by using fewer words to express the same sentiment. 7. Writing every single day will help you avoid writers block by maintaining a flow to your writing practice. 8. Without editing, write your first draft freely. 9. The perfect moment to write may never come, so don’t sit around waiting for it. 10. 11. 12. Every great writer has a good routine.

Medieval Names - List of Medieval Names Fifty Writing Tools: Quick List Use this quick list of Writing Tools as a handy reference. Copy it and keep it in your wallet or journal, or near your desk or keyboard. Share it and add to it. I. 1. Strong verbs create action, save words, and reveal the players.4. 6. II. 11. Dig for the concrete and specific, details that appeal to the senses.15. III. 24. 28. IV. 40. All of these tips are available via podcast through iTunes. To purchase a copy of “Writing Tools: 50 Essential Strategies for Every Writer,” visit your local or online bookstore or click here (as an Amazon affiliate, Poynter will receive a small cut of the profit).

Character Flaw Index To make characters realistic and relatable they are given flaws, because if there is anything a writer can be sure of it is that no one in their audience will be perfect. Flaws are character traits that have a negative impact in the narrative, unless they are simply informed. They can also be exploited. See Good Flaws, Bad Flaws for a scale of flaw acceptability. Compare Seven Deadly Sins, Ego Tropes. Abusive Parents: Habitually violent and cruel to their own children, often because that's how they themselves were raised.

Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling | Aerogramme Writers' StudioPixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar’s Story Artist. Number 9 on the list – When you’re stuck, make a list of what wouldn’t happen next – is a great one and can apply to writers in all genres. You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. Physical Descriptions - List of Hair Colors Hair Color List (Note: an updated and expanded version of this list appears in my 15K-word book How to Describe Hair and Skin. See below.) [First, my profound apologies to the vast majority of readers who don't steal content, but I have to state the following. This article and all content on this website belongs to Val Kovalin, copyright © Obsidianbookshelf.com, except where noted. I'll admit it – hair colors are fun, even for someone like me who advocates keeping description to a minimum. Natural human hair color comes in these basic shades: blond(e), red, light brown, dark brown, black, gray, white. Don't forget about highlights! What are the nouns that apply to people with certain hair colors? Also, sometimes words pick up additional shades of meaning over time that are irrational but exist, and you won't find these connotations listed in the dictionary. Please check for frequent updates to this list! Blond – ash Blond – bronze.

Bird by Bird: Anne Lamott’s Timeless Advice on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity by Maria Popova “Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor, the enemy of the people. It will keep you cramped and insane your whole life.” Anne Lamott’s Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life (public library) is among my 10 favorite books on writing — a treasure trove of insight both practical and profound, timelessly revisitable and yielding deeper resonance each time. One of the gifts of being a writer is that it gives you an excuse to do things, to go places and explore. What makes Lamott so compelling is that all of her advice comes not from the ivory tower of the pantheon but from an honest place of exquisite vulnerability and hard-earned life-wisdom. I started writing when I was seven or eight. So she found refuge in books, searching for “some sort of creative or spiritual or aesthetic way of seeing the world and organizing it in [her] head.” I still encourage anyone who feels at all compelled to write to do so. But, one might wonder, why? Donating = Loving

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How to Break the Rules of Writing (& More) According to Bestselling YA author Ransom Riggs Like most first conversations and bad first drafts, my (WD’s Managing Editor Adrienne Crezo) interview with Ransom Riggs begins with a discussion about the weather. And not just any weather, either, but peculiar versions of standard precipitation: dust storms, cloudbursts, thundersnow and tornadoes. Of course, Riggs is experiencing none of those phenomena as he sits in the warmth of the never-ending summer of Los Angeles. That kind of easygoing humor is familiar to Riggs’ fans. Whatever dreams Riggs may have had about his future, he couldn’t have predicted the wild success of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, a tale of time travel and magic set against the eerie backdrop of unnerving black-and-white photos of levitating girls and creepy twin clowns. It’s easy to see why Riggs is enjoying the ride, but what appears to have happened overnight actually evolved over many years. Luckily, Riggs decided to take the editor’s advice. [Writing a Hero's Adventure story? Yes.

Famous Writers' Small Writing Sheds and Off-the-Grid Huts Previous image Next image Roald Dahl's writing hut, The Gipsy House When I hear the phrase "writing hut" or "backyard shed" my imagination practically squeals with delight. Roald Dahl "The whole of the inside was organised as a place for writing: so the old wing-back chair had part of the back burrowed out to make it more comfortable; he had a sleeping bag that he put his legs in when it was cold and a footstool to rest them on; he had a very characteristic Roald arrangement for a writing table with a bar across the arms of the chair and a cardboard tube that altered the angle of the board on which he wrote. Mark Twain "It is the loveliest study you ever saw...octagonal with a peaked roof, each face filled with a spacious window...perched in complete isolation on the top of an elevation that commands leagues of valley and city and retreating ranges of distant blue hills. George Bernard Shaw Dylan Thomas "Dylan Thomas’s writing shed began its life back in the 1920s. Henry David Thoreau

These Writing Tips From George R.R. Martin And Robin Hobb Are Just Epic Recursive outlining and writing I am in the middle of writing my dissertation, and I’m constantly experimenting with my writing process flow and set-up. I have two monitors, a 19 and a 22-inch one. The overall writing process appears to be a recursive process of alternating between outlining and writing (though the two are not always clearly separable). My actual writing started once I got to a point that I had so many outlines in different outliners that the only way out of that morass was to start writing them up. Let’s call that condition obsessive-compulsive outlining behaviour (OCOB), and the cure “writing.” The reason for the many outlines is that I use outliners as part of a distillation process, for extracting and abstracting information by translating ideas from one outliner into another. To my surprise I have selected Word 2010 as my main writing tool. So, Word is open in my 19-in monitor that is facing me and where I do the final writing up (dictating with Dragon or typing with WordExpander). Like this:

3 Tips for Writing Heavy Emotional Scenes Yesterday, I tweeted a link to a great post by Sally Apokedak about not cheating the reader by skipping emotional scenes. Some writers struggle with heavy scenes. They’re uncomfortable with “invading” the privacy of their characters. However, those aren’t good reasons for avoiding writing certain scenes. Reader Emotions and Character Emotions Don’t Have to Match First, let’s talk about how people experience emotions when they’re reading, and specifically, let’s discuss the heavy kind of emotions—the ones that we, as readers, don’t necessarily want to experience. However, with heavy, often dark, emotions, readers’ self-preservation instincts might kick in and make them pull back from deep empathy. This means we shouldn’t focus on a poignant phrase here or a heartbreaking image there to create a specific emotion. In other words, let the emotion come from the subtext. Tip #1: Use a Less Deep Point-of-View for Uncomfortably Heavy Scenes J.K. Tip #2: Emotional Doesn’t Mean Melodramatic

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