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Electronic theory index

Electronic theory index

Welcome Understanding Schematics You can see that there are various bits represented by symbols, all connected in various ways. Let’s look at some of the big picture concepts: Left to Right: The first thing to notice is that you read the schematic left-to-right: the input on the left feeds the signal through parts and pathways in the middle to an output on the right. This left-to-right convention is not universal, but it is probably the most common layout for a schematic. Each symbol shows a part number and a part value or type. Connections: The connections between components are shown by lines. Figure 1.2: Various Ways of Depicting Connected Lines In the first example on the left, a dot shows interconnecting lines. Inputs and Outputs For stompbox designs, you almost always have an input and an output. So when you look at a schematic like this, you are dealing with a sort of shorthand that the schematic author used. Figure 2.1: Shorthand Depiction of Inputs and Outputs Figure 2.2: Mapping Shorthand to the Real World Power

Laser Cutting (Article) Laser cutters work their magic by focusing a high-powered laser onto a material. The beam is focused down to a point as small as one-thousandth of an inch and can burn, melt, or even vaporize the material it hits. What type of material can be cut depends on the strength of the laser. A 30 watt laser can cut paper, acrylic, and hardboard while a 10 Kilowatt laser can cut through stainless steel that's one inch thick. To control the path of the laser all you need to do is create a vector file and send it to the laser cutter. Laser cutters have been around for quite a while for industrial uses, but in the past few years theyve become more affordable.

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RGBLED \ Learning This example is for Wiring version 1.0 build 0100+. If you have a previous version, use the examples included with your software. If you see any errors or have comments, please let us know. RGB LED by BARRAGAN Demonstrates the use of PWM pins (analog output) to change the color of an RGB LED. On Wiring v1 boards the PWM capable pins are: 29, 30, 31, 35, 36 and 37 On Wiring S board the PWM capable pins are: 4, 5, 6, 7, 19 and 20 int REDPin = 4; int GREENPin = 5; int BLUEPin = 6; int brightness = 0; int increment = 5; void setup() { pinMode(REDPin, OUTPUT); pinMode(GREENPin, OUTPUT); pinMode(BLUEPin, OUTPUT); Serial.begin(9600); } void loop() { brightness = brightness + increment; if (brightness <= 0 || brightness >= 255) { increment = -increment; } brightness = constrain(brightness, 0, 255); analogWrite(REDPin, brightness); analogWrite(GREENPin, brightness); analogWrite(BLUEPin, brightness); delay(20); }

2.4G Wireless nRF24L01+ Module 2.4G Wireless nRF24L01 Module [WIR001] - $5.50 : iStore, Make Innovation Easier As we mentioned before , IBOX can run various versions of operating systems, including linux and android , etc. Some guys are wondering about the differences between the operating system of FLASH version and SD card version, thus we’d like to give a simple reply here : Whether it is linux or Android, NAND FLASH version and the SD card version only differ in the installation position: one is installed in the NAND FLASH and another is installed in a Micro-SD card. System of SD card version cannot work in NAND FLASH, vice versa. At present, IBOX boot sequence gives priority to SD card, if there is an SD card and a system that can run on the SD card , it will boot directly from the SD card. Here, the vedio shows booting into the system with a few different versions of Linux and Android. We would like to thank Santyago , who offers Sunflower Linux 1.0 Beta system for Iteaduio Plus A10 users. For more information, please click HERE.

nRF24L01 Six Channels To One Receiver | ITead Studio As we mentioned before , IBOX can run various versions of operating systems, including linux and android , etc. Some guys are wondering about the differences between the operating system of FLASH version and SD card version, thus we’d like to give a simple reply here : Whether it is linux or Android, NAND FLASH version and the SD card version only differ in the installation position: one is installed in the NAND FLASH and another is installed in a Micro-SD card. System of SD card version cannot work in NAND FLASH, vice versa. At present, IBOX boot sequence gives priority to SD card, if there is an SD card and a system that can run on the SD card , it will boot directly from the SD card. If there is no SD card or no operating system that can run on the SD card, the system will boot from NAND FLASH. Here, the vedio shows booting into the system with a few different versions of Linux and Android. For more information, please click HERE.

Getting started with Arduino! – Chapter Zero Hello world! Updated 24/11/2012 Please join with us as we learn about electronics and the Arduino! So let’s get started… There are over fifty chapters in this series, however you should start here (chapter zero). Getting Started with Arduino (Massimo Banzi) and also assume a basic knowledge of electronics. If you would prefer an off-line method of learning, or would like a great book on the topic – consider my book “Arduino Workshop” – it’s the best book on the market for a complete beginner to learn about Arduino. First of all, let’s breakdown the whole system into the basic parts. Arduino is an open source physical computing platform based on a simple input/output board and a development environment that implements the Processing language (www.processing.org). So, we have hardware and software. Our software is the IDE – software very similar to a word-processor, but can send the Arduino program (or “sketch”) to the micro controller. Now for the Arduino itself. Great! How did you go? Notes:

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