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UNC Chemistry Fundamentals

UNC Chemistry Fundamentals
An Interactive Educational Exercise Because of special formatting tags needed to display exponents, this site is best viewed with Netscape 3.0 or higher. If needed, use the link under Useful Materials to download Netscape About the Chemistry Fundamentals Course This exercise is designed for anyone who wants an introduction or review of the fundamentals of chemistry that will be used in freshman level chemistry classes. This interactive course was used for the first time during the summer of 1997. Evaluations from last year's materials suggested that, while the mathematics and calculator sections were useful, one of the most appreciated benefits of the materials was the review of basic high school chemistry. Currently, this site is used as a resource that can be beneficial to any student that is enrolled in a freshman chemistry course. About these materials How to use these materials The basic procedure is as follows:Take the pre-test for a certain sections. About the Sidebar

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Chemistry Central blog We are pleased to announce that Professor Liang-Nian He, a Professor of Chemistry at the State Key Laboratory of Elemento-Organic Chemistry, Nankai University, China has joined the Editorial Board for Sustainable Chemical Processes. His research interests include: green synthetic chemistry; synthesis and application of task-specific ionic liquids; catalysis in green solvents such as ionic liquids, PEG and water; CO2 chemistry; biomass conversion, particularly chemical transformations of CO2 into fuels, chemicals and materials; and CO2 capture and utilization. Associate Professor Michael Oelgemöller from James Cook University, Australia also joins us on the Editorial Board. His research activities include synthetic organic photochemistry, solar photochemistry, microflow photochemistry, the development of new photochemical synthesis tools and photochemical water treatment. He is a leading expert in … Read more

Home Common Compound Library A searchable database of over 800 common compound names, formulas, structures, and properties. Companion Notes Hyperlinked notes and guides for first semester general chemistry. Construction Kits Flash-based kits for building chemical formulas, names, equations, and problem solutions. The Chemogenesis Webbook Unlike chemistry textbooks printed on paper, this webbook contains dynamic Synthlet and Database pages that explore and make predictions about aspects of chemical structure & reactivity and have embedded reaction chemistry YouTube Videos. Thanks go to the authors of web sites linked to from these pages, to members of the International Society for the Philosophy of Chemistry (ISPC) and to the members of the ChemEd internet discussion list who have answered my many questions and synthesized such interesting postings. This web book is being continually updated. Please send comments, link suggestions, factual errors, browser problems, bug & broken link reports, etc., to the author:

Chemistry Most of the services are free for academic researchers in Finland, but require a user account (also in Finnish) at CSC. Overview: Quick introduction to services useful for chemists. Programs: A wide selection of chemistry programs is available and supported. Nonrenewable and Renewable Energy Resources : QUEST There are nine major areas of energy resources. They fall into two categories: nonrenewable and renewable. Nonrenewable energy resources, like coal, nuclear, oil, and natural gas, are available in limited supplies. White Tea Vs. Green Tea - Difference Between White Tea And Green Tea Almost everyone has a fair idea of the health benefits of green tea. For the health conscious, green tea is a part and parcel of the daily routine. And why not, when for decades people have been bombarded with advertisements extolling the medicinal properties of green tea, and rightly so. But now this esteemed position of green tea is severely threatened, from its pinnacle as the healthiest beverage, by a member of its own family.

chemsoc - for everyone into chemistry We want everyone to experience the excitement and value of the chemical sciences. Our members and supporters reach out to connect people - from schoolchildren to scientists to political leaders - with chemistry. Whether you want to attend or run an event, set up a meeting or spend a few minutes writing an email, find out in this section how to get involved. Also in Campaigning & outreach: CampaigningFind out about our current campaigns and see how you can get involved in a way that suits you. PolicySee how we help to shape policy debates by providing expert information and leading the development of policy in key areas.

Potential Energy An object can store energy as the result of its position. For example, the heavy ball of a demolition machine is storing energy when it is held at an elevated position. This stored energy of position is referred to as potential energy. Similarly, a drawn bow is able to store energy as the result of its position. When assuming its usual position (i.e., when not drawn), there is no energy stored in the bow.

Top 10 Amazing Chemistry Videos Fiery explosions, beautiful reactions, and hilarious music videos are great reasons to be excited about chemistry. Here are some of our favorites. 10. Thermite vs. Molecular orbital Complete acetylene (H–C≡C–H) molecular orbital set. The left column shows MO's which are occupied in the ground state, with the lowest-energy orbital at the top. The white and grey line visible in some MO's is the molecular axis passing through the nuclei. The orbital wave functions are positive in the red regions and negative in the blue. The right column shows virtual MO's which are empty in the ground state, but may be occupied in excited states.

Kinetic and Potential Energy Kinetic energy is energy possessed by a body by virtue of its movement. Potential energy is the energy possessed by a body by virtue of its position or state. While kinetic energy of an object is relative to the state of other objects in its environment, potential energy is completely independent of its environment. Hence the acceleration of an object is not evident in the movement of one object, where other objects in the same environment are also in motion. For example, a bullet whizzing past a person who is standing possesses kinetic energy, but the bullet has no kinetic energy with respect to a train moving alongside. Interconversion of Kinetic and Potential Energy

Chemistry Now The National Science Foundation (NSF) has joined forces with NBC Learn and the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) to celebrate the International Year of Chemistry by creating "Chemistry Now"--a weekly, online video series that uncovers and explains the science of common, physical objects in our world and the changes they undergo every day. The series also looks at the lives and work of scientists on the frontiers of the 21st century... More. This video explains and illustrates the molecular structure of sodium chloride (NaCl) crystals; the structure and symmetry of crystal lattices; and why one crystalline solid, salt, melts another, ice. Josiah Willard Gibbs In 1863, Yale awarded Gibbs the first American doctorate in engineering. After a three-year sojourn in Europe, Gibbs spent the rest of his career at Yale, where he was professor of mathematical physics from 1871 until his death. Working in relative isolation, he became the earliest theoretical scientist in the United States to earn an international reputation and was praised by Albert Einstein as "the greatest mind in American history".[1] In 1901 Gibbs received what was then considered the highest honor awarded by the international scientific community, the Copley Medal of the Royal Society of London,[1] "for his contributions to mathematical physics".[2]

Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter We are all surrounded by matter on a daily basis. Anything that we use, touch, eat, etc. is an example of matter. Matter can be defined or described as anything that takes up space, and it is composed of miniscule particles called atoms. It must display the two properties of mass and inertia. Introduction

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