background preloader

44 Prompts Merging Reflective Thinking With Bloom's Taxonomy

44 Prompts Merging Reflective Thinking With Bloom's Taxonomy
44 Prompts Merging Reflective Thinking With Bloom’s Taxonomy by Peter Pappas It’s been four years since I first published my “Taxonomy of Reflection.” My interest in reflective thinking is rooted in a simple but powerful statement by Donald Finkel who wrote that teaching should be thought of as “providing experience, provoking reflection.” (Teaching with Your Mouth Shut) Most school mission statements include a reference to “fostering life-long learners.” Unfortunately, self-reflection is rarely taught in school. I developed my Taxonomy of Reflection in an effort to provide a schema of prompts that could be used by students, teachers and administrators to hone their reflective skills. Seen through Bloom, that’s the equivalent of “Remembering: Retrieving, recognizing, and recalling relevant knowledge from short- or long-term memory.” Below are 44 sample of higher order reflective prompts. 1. Student 2. 3. Teacher 4. 5. 6. Principal 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/44-prompts-merging-reflective-thinking-blooms-taxonomy/

Related:  Bloom's TaxonomyTeaching Research / Ideas / StrategiesPensamiento CríticoEstrategias

Resources for Bloom's Taxonomy My initial interest in linking Bloom's Taxonomy to apps stems from a deep-seated desire to meet the unique educational needs of gifted and talented students. During the first ten years of my teaching career, I watched as schools did everything possible to make sure test scores remained strong and “no child was left behind”. Meanwhile in the wake of these changes, students lost opportunities to develop creative problem solving skills, critical thinking, and experience deeper, more meaningful learning. To add fuel to the fire, Gifted Programs began to slowly vanish from our schools. Like most of the public schools in California, the school district in which I was currently working cut their Gifted and Talented Program. Teaching strategies If you have dropped into this Course Design Tutorial from somewhere else, you might wish to start at the introduction, overview, or table of contents. If you are working through the tutorial, you should have completed Part 2.1 before beginning this section. At this stage of the tutorial, you have set overarching goals, organized content, and developed a course plan with ideas for how to give students the practice that will make it possible for them to achieve the course goals. In this section of the tutorial, you will make choices about what you will have students do in order to learn the course content and practice the goals.

Bloom's taxonomy Bloom's wheel, according to the Bloom's verbs and matching assessment types. The verbs are intended to be feasible and measurable. Bloom's taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education. It is named for Benjamin Bloom, who chaired the committee of educators that devised the taxonomy, and who also edited the first volume of the standard text, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: The Classification of Educational Goals. Bloom's taxonomy refers to a classification of the different objectives that educators set for students (learning objectives). It divides educational objectives into three "domains": cognitive, affective, and psychomotor (sometimes loosely described as "knowing/head", "feeling/heart" and "doing/hands" respectively).

Twelve Active Learning Strategies Example 1 Example 1 Explanation In order for students to learn effectively, they must make connections between what they already know (prior knowledge) and new content to which they're exposed. The opening of a lecture should facilitate these connections by helping students exercise their prior knowledge of the day's subject matter. Bloom’s Taxonomy by Patricia Armstrong, Assistant Director, Center for Teaching Background Information In 1956, Benjamin Bloom with collaborators Max Englehart, Edward Furst, Walter Hill, and David Krathwohl published a framework for categorizing educational goals: Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Familiarly known as Bloom’s Taxonomy, this framework has been applied by generations of K-12 teachers and college instructors in their teaching.

7 Things To Remember About Educational Feedback Infographic Teacher Infographics At the 7 Things To Remember About Educational Feedback Infographic you will find 7 Educational Feedback Tips that will help Teachers give and receive effective classroom feedback. Feedback is not advice, praise or evaluation. Feedback is information about how we are doing in our efforts to reach a goal.If students know the classroom is a safe place to make mistakes, they are more likely to use feedback for learning.The feedback students give teachers can be more powerful than the feedback teachers give students.When we give a grade as a part of feedback, students often don’t see past the grade.Effective feedback occurs during the learning, when there is still time to act on it.Most of the feedback that students receive about their classroom work is from other students – and most of that feedback is wrong.Students need to know their learning target – the specific skill they’re supposed to learn – or else feedback is just someone telling them what to do.

Bloom's Taxonomy Mary Forehand The University of Georgia Introduction One of the basic questions facing educators has always been "Where do we begin in seeking to improve human thinking?" (Houghton, 2004). Fortunately we do not have to begin from scratch in searching for answers to this complicated question.

Some Basic Active Learning Strategies Engaging students in individual or small group activities–pairs or trios especially–is a low-risk strategy that ensures the participation of all. The sampling of basic activities below can be adapted to almost any discussion or lecture setting. Using these strategies, or variations on them, ensures that you'll hold your students' attention in class and throughout the semester. Ice Breakers Those things that get people talking quickly and personally about their goals, fears, expectations for the session before them. Ask them, for example, to consider what one thing each hopes to gain from the workshop and what one thing each hopes to offer during the workshop, then have the group get up to rove the room for five minutes gathering a sense of what others have come to gain and to offer.

Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy Various researchers have summarized how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following are four interpretations that you can use as guides in helping to write objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy. From: KC Metro [old link, no longer functioning?] Bloom’s Taxonomy divides the way people learn into three domains. Center for Research on Learning Learning Strategies brochure (pdf) Learning strategies are used by students to help them understand information and solve problems. A learning strategy is a person's approach to learning and using information. Students who do not know or use good learning strategies often learn passively and ultimately fail in school. Learning strategy instruction focuses on making the students more active learners by teaching them how to learn and how to use what they have learned to solve problems and be successful. The Learning Strategies Curriculum has the necessary breadth and depth to provide a well-designed scope and sequence of strategy instruction.

bloom's taxonomy of learning domains - bloom's learning model, for teaching, lesson plans, training cousres design planning and evaluation development of bloom's taxonomy Benjamin S Bloom (1913-99) attained degrees at Pennsylvania State University in 1935. He joined the Department of Education at the University of Chicago in 1940 and attained a PhD in Education in 1942, during which time he specialised in examining. Here he met his mentor Ralph Tyler with whom he first began to develop his ideas for developing a system (or 'taxonomy') of specifications to enable educational training and learning objectives to be planned and measured properly - improving the effectiveness of developing 'mastery' instead of simply transferring facts for mindless recall. Bloom continued to develop the Learning Taxonomy model through the 1960's, and was appointed Charles H Swift Distinguished Service Professor at Chicago in 1970.

Best Practices for At Risk Students With the recent proliferation of programs designed for at-risk students, it becomes essential to review the available literature in order to define the students we focus upon and determine which practices have proved most effective. Although some published reports are either anecdotal or flawed by poor design (Cox, Davidson, & Bynum, 1995), consensus seems to be emerging regarding best practices for at-risk students. Definitions of at-risk students But we must first ask who is at-risk? And at-risk of what?

Levels of Questions in Bloom's Taxonomy: Teaching Methodoly Advice (Grades K Page 1 of 2 The goal of classroom questioning is not to determine whether students have learned something (as would be the case in tests, quizzes, and exams), but rather to guide students to help them learn necessary information and material. Questions should be used to teach students rather than to just test students! Teachers frequently spend a great deal of classroom time testing students through questions. In fact, observations of teachers at all levels of education reveal that most spend more than 90 percent of their instructional time testing students (through questioning). And most of the questions teachers ask are typically factual questions that rely on short-term memory.

Related: