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Fab Lab FAQ

Fab Lab FAQ
Fab Lab FAQ Fab labs provide widespread access to modern means for invention. They began as an outreach project from MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA). CBA assembled millions of dollars in machines for research in digital fabrication, ultimately aiming at developing programmable molecular assemblers that will be able to make almost anything. Fab labs fall between these extremes, comprising roughly fifty thousand dollars in equipment and materials that can be used today to do what will be possible with tomorrow's personal fabricators. Fab labs have spread from inner-city Boston to rural India, from South Africa to the North of Norway. Fab labs share core capabilities, so that people and projects can be shared across them. Fab labs are described here: Related:  Saved for later2

NSDL.org - National Science Digital Library Smithsonian X 3D Fab lab A fab lab (fabrication laboratory) is a small-scale workshop offering (personal) digital fabrication.[1][2] A fab lab is generally equipped with an array of flexible computer controlled tools that cover several different length scales and various materials, with the aim to make "almost anything".[3] This includes technology-enabled products generally perceived as limited to mass production. While fab labs have yet to compete with mass production and its associated economies of scale in fabricating widely distributed products, they have already shown the potential to empower individuals to create smart devices for themselves. These devices can be tailored to local or personal needs in ways that are not practical or economical using mass production. History[edit] Popular equipment and projects[edit] Flexible manufacturing equipment within a fab lab can include: FabFi[edit] List of labs[edit] MIT maintains a listing of all official Fab Labs, worldwide. See also[edit] References[edit]

Engineering Your Future Ohio Engineering Your Future is a collaborative project between the College of Engineering & Applied Science at the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati-area high schools and schools across Ohio. This site provides the resources needed to offer the program to high school students. This site contains:Teaching materialsProject materials and lesson plansInstructional videosResource lists to find other topics / projectsOur program differs from other similar efforts in that the materials and projects are adaptable to the particular needs of individual schools and the students they serve. We invite you to explore the site and use the materials. more students to be successful in engineering and technology careers. Eugene RutzProject Manager A good place for students to start is to watch this video that describes the course and discusses engineering, technology and science. If you'd like to hear from students and a teacher watch this brief video from Mt Notre Dame high school.

7 Educational Uses for 3D Printing - Getting Smart by Guest Author - EdTech, higher ed, Innovation By Nancy Parker When someone says that they have a 3D printer, many people visualize a printer that produces 3D images on a sheet of paper. In actuality, a 3D printer goes beyond an image on paper and brings the object to life in real 3D. Layer by layer, the 3D printer can replicate images created in CAD programs. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. If it can be created in a supported 3D rendering program, it can exist in real life. Nancy Parker writes about wide range of subjects like health, Parenting, Child Care, Babysitting, nanny, www.enannysource.com/ etc. Photo Courtesy of Makerbot

Human factors and ergonomics Human factors and ergonomics (HF&E), also known as comfort design, functional design, and user-friendly systems,[1] is the practice of designing products, systems or processes to take proper account of the interaction between them and the people who use them. The field has seen contributions from numerous disciplines, such as psychology, engineering, biomechanics, industrial design, physiology and anthropometry. In essence, it is the study of designing equipment and devices that fit the human body and its cognitive abilities. The two terms "human factors" and "ergonomics" are essentially synonymous.[2][3][4] The International Ergonomics Association defines ergonomics or human factors as follows:[5] HF&E is employed to fulfill the goals of occupational health and safety and productivity. Human factors and ergonomics is concerned with the "fit" between the user, equipment and their environments. Etymology[edit] Domains of specialization[edit] New terms are being generated all the time. Books

Harvard STEM Teaching Videos Posted on May 28th, 2013 by Mary Lord Looking for a way to make probability come to life in your multicultural math class and assess which students “got it?” How about a fun activity that gives high-school students a hands-on feel for fundamental calculus concepts and also meets state content standards? The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for for Astrophysics has compiled a digital video library full of curriculum-enhancing lessons, assessment tools, and case studies - all developed and used by teachers in their classrooms. These “Videos to Enhance Understanding and Teaching of K-12 Learning Goals,” as the project is called, feature: • Clinical Interviews of Student Ideas • Demonstrations of Phenomena • Case Studies of Instruction or Research • Interviews with Experts • Correlations to state and national curriculum standards Clips can be searched for in a variety of ways. The collection of 1,017 movies includes a range of topics. Among the “What’s the Point?”

The Simple Idea behind This Mind-Blowing 3D Interactive Sandbox Playing in the sandbox used to be my favorite activity as a small child. I remember making pretend volcanos, rivers, lakes, and tunnels in the sand. Well, researchers at UC Davis have come up with a way to bring those imaginary landscapes to life with interactive 3D projection technology. The results are simply breath-taking! When you were a kid, did your sandbox have active volcanoes? This amazing interactive sandbox responds to your actions, and can be built at home using common-place technology. All it takes is a digital projector and a Kinect. The projector displays an interactive topographic map, with contour and elevation in real-time. You can make hills and valleys, and the computer changes the projection to match the landscape! Museums around the world are starting to create their own interactive sandboxes… It’s not only fun… it’s a great way to teach kids about geography! Watch the full demo video here… I can’t wait to try this!

Project Management Articles - PM Hut LinkEngineering - Homepage SketchUp Pro Graphics Software—Free License Extended to Ohio Public Schools Through 2016 Laws of science The laws of science or scientific laws are statements that describe, predict, and perhaps explain why, a range of phenomena behave as they appear to in nature.[1] The term "law" has diverse usage in many cases: approximate, accurate, broad or narrow theories, in all natural scientific disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology, geology, astronomy etc.). An analogous term for a scientific law is a principle. Scientific laws: Laws differ from hypotheses and postulates, which are proposed during the scientific process before and during validation by experiment and observation. These are not laws since they have not been verified to the same degree and may not be sufficiently general, although they may lead to the formulation of laws. Fundamentally, all scientific laws follow from physics, laws which occur in other sciences ultimately follow from physical laws. Conservation laws[edit] Conservation and symmetry[edit] Continuity and transfer[edit] Laws of classical mechanics[edit] where Other laws

ITEEA - Engineering byDesign™ (EbD) The International Technology and Engineering Educators Association's STEM±Center for Teaching and Learning™ has developed the only standards-based national model for Grades K-12 that delivers technological literacy in a STEM context. The model, Engineering byDesign™ is built on the Common Core State Standards ( High School / Middle School), Next Generation Science Standards (K-12), Standards for Technological Literacy (ITEEA); Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (NCTM); and Project 2061, Benchmarks for Science Literacy (AAAS). Additionally, the Program K-12 has been mapped to the National Academy of Engineering's Grand Challenges for Engineering. Using constructivist models, students participating in the program learn concepts and principles in an authentic, problem/project-based environment.

Presidential Climate Action Project — PCAP

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