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Scoville scale

Scoville scale
A display of hot peppers with an explanation of the Scoville scale at the H-E-B Central Market in Houston, Texas The Scoville scale is the measurement of the pungency (spicy heat) of chili peppers or other spicy foods as reported in Scoville heat units (SHU),[1] a function of capsaicin concentration. The scale is named after its creator, American pharmacist Wilbur Scoville. His method, devised in 1912, is known as the Scoville Organoleptic Test.[2] Unlike methods based on high-performance liquid chromatography, the Scoville scale is an empirical measurement dependent on the capsaicin sensitivity of testers and so is not a precise or accurate method to measure capsaicinoid concentration. Scoville organoleptic test[edit] Scoville ratings[edit] Considerations[edit] Since Scoville ratings are defined per unit of dry mass, comparison of ratings between products having different water content can be misleading. ASTA pungency units[edit] External links[edit] References[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scoville_scale

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