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Transgender Models Strike A Pose In New Barneys Ads, Catalogs: PHOTOSNewNowNext

Transgender Models Strike A Pose In New Barneys Ads, Catalogs: PHOTOSNewNowNext
by Eric Shorey 1/30/2014 Valentijn (on left) wears Giorgio Armani. Ryley (center) wears Armani Collezioni. Leonard and Gloria wear their own clothes. Photo © Bruce Weber. Barneys has taken a progressive step forward with its new ad campaign and catalogs: Shot by legendary photographer Bruce Weber, “Brothers, Sisters, Sons & Daughters“ features some 17 trans men and women sporting high-end fashion available at the luxe retailer “I was exquisitely aware that in the last decade, the [lesbian, gay and bi] communities have made extraordinary advances, and the transgender community has not shared in that progress,” Barneys marketing exec Dennis Freedman, formerly the creative director of W magazine, told the New York Times. The models are depicted interacting with family members and loved ones (while still looking devastatingly gorgeous) and their personal stories are being shared on a Barney’s mini-site, The Window. View some images from the “Brothers Sisters, Sons and Daughters” campaign below.

http://www.newnownext.com/transgender-supermodels-strike-a-pose-for-barneys-ads-and-catalogues-photos/01/2014/

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