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Green Man - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Nightly

Green Man - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Nightly
Types[edit] Lady Raglan coined the term "Green Man" in her 1939 article "The Green Man in Church Architecture" in The Folklore Journal.[3] Some commentators conflate or associate the term with "Jack in the Green".[4] Usually referred to in works on architecture as foliate heads or foliate masks, carvings of the Green Man may take many forms, naturalistic or decorative. The simplest depict a man's face peering out of dense foliage. Some may have leaves for hair, perhaps with a leafy beard. The Green Man appears in many forms, with the three most common types categorized as: the Foliate Head: completely covered in green leavesthe Disgorging Head: spews vegetation from its mouththe Bloodsucker Head: sprouts vegetation from all facial orifices (e.g. tear ducts, nostrils and mouth)[5][6] In churches[edit] To the modern observer the earlier (Romanesque and medieval) carvings often have an unnervingly eerie or numinous quality. Later variations[edit] Modern images[edit] Related characters[edit] Related:  Dioses y Monstruos Primordiales

Rosslyn Chapel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Nightly Rosslyn Chapel, formally known as the Collegiate Chapel of St Matthew, was founded on a small hill above Roslin Glen as a Catholic collegiate church (with between four and six ordained canons and two boy choristers) in the mid-15th century. Rosslyn Chapel and the nearby Roslin Castle are located at the village of Roslin, Midlothian, Scotland. The chapel was founded by William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness (also spelled "Sainteclaire/Saintclair/Sinclair/St. Clair") of the Sinclair family, a noble family descended in part from Norman knights from the commune of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte in northern France, using the standard designs the medieval architects made available to him. Rosslyn Chapel is the third Sinclair place of worship at Roslin, the first being in Roslin Castle and the second (whose crumbling buttresses can still be seen today) in what is now Roslin Cemetery.[1] In later years the chapel has featured in speculative theories regarding Freemasonry and the Knights Templar.

Elf In English literature of the Elizabethan era, "elves" became conflated with the "fairies" of Romance culture, so that the two terms began to be used interchangeably. Romanticist writers were influenced by this (particularly Shakespearean) notion of the "elf," and reimported the word Elf in that context into the German language. A number of ballads in the British Isles and Scandinavia, perhaps stemming from the medieval period, describe human encounters with the elf, elven-king, elf-maid, etc. Etymology In sister languages the forms are Old Norse álfr, Old High German alp (plural alpî, elpî) and Middle High German alp (feminine singular elbe, plural elbe, elber).[7] German cognates Onomastics In personal names In German heroic epic material, Alphart and Alphere (father of Walter of Aquitaine)[25][26] have been regarded as bearing the "elf" element in their names. Kennings In Skaldic poetry, the álfr word stem is used nearly always in a kenning for a warrior or a full-fledged man[28][29](e.g.

Celtic polytheism Celtic polytheism, commonly known as Celtic paganism,[1][2][3] comprises the religious beliefs and practices adhered to by the Iron Age peoples of Western Europe now known as the Celts, roughly between 500 BCE and 500 CE, spanning the La Tène period and the Roman era, and in the case of the Insular Celts the British and Irish Iron Age. Celtic polytheism was one of a larger group of Iron Age polytheistic religions of the Indo-European family. It comprised a large degree of variation both geographically and chronologically, although "behind this variety, broad structural similarities can be detected"[4] allowing there to be "a basic religious homogeneity" amongst the Celtic peoples.[5] The Celtic pantheon consists of numerous recorded theonyms, both from Greco-Roman ethnography and from epigraphy. In the later 5th and the 6th centuries, the Celtic region was Christianized and earlier religious traditions were supplanted. Sources[edit] Three Celtic goddesses, as depicted at Coventina's well.

Primeval Gods of Greek Mythology THEOI.COM The first born of the immortals, who formed the very fabric of the universe, were known in Greek mythology as the Protogenoi (protos meaning "first," and genos "born"). They were, for the most part, purely elemental beings - Uranus was the literal sky, Gaea the body of the earth, etc. A few of them were ocassionally described or portrayed in anthropomorphic form, however these forms were inevitably inseperable from their native element. For example Gaea or Thalassa might appear as a woman half risen from the earth or sea. AETHER (Aither) The Protogenos of the mists of light which fill the upper zones of air. ANANKE The Protogeonos of inevitability, compulsion and necessity. CHAOS (Khaos) The Protogenos of the lower air. CHRONOS (Khronos) The Protogenos of time was the very first being to emerge at creation self-formed. EREBUS (Erebos) The Protogenos of the mists of darkness. EROS The Protegonos of generation. GAEA (Gaia) The Protogenos of the earth. HYDROS The Protogenos of water.

Lake Guatavita - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Nightly The Zipa used to cover his body in gold dust and, from his raft, he offered treasures to the Guatavita goddess in the middle of the sacred lake. This old Muisca tradition became the origin of El Dorado legend. This model is on display in the Gold Museum, Bogotá, Colombia Votive objects found at the bottom of Lake Guatavita in the British Museum The lake is circular and about a quarter mile in diameter, formed by what appears to be a crater. There are hot springs nearby giving the name of the nearby Municipality of Sesquilé, which means hot water. The name of the lake is derived from Spanish laguna: pool or pond, and Guatavita from Chibcha (language of the Muisca people) gwa: mountain or gwata, gwate: high elevation, or gwatibita: high mountain peak; hence, a pool at a high mountain peak. [2] The lake is now a focus of ecotourism, and its association with the legend of El Dorado is also a major attraction. Muisca mythology[edit] See also[edit] Trivia[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Dietz, R.

Brownie (folklore) Every manor house had its ùruisg, and in the kitchen, close by the fire was a seat, which was left unoccupied for him. One house on the banks of the River Tay was even until the beginning of the twentieth century believed to have been haunted by such a sprite, and one room in the house was for centuries called "Seòmar Bhrùnaidh" (Brownie’s room). In 1703, John Brand wrote in his description of Shetland (which he called "Zetland") that: “Not above forty or fifty years ago, every family had a brownie, or evil spirit, so called, which served them, to which they gave a sacrifice for his service; as when they churned their milk, they took a part thereof, and sprinkled every corner of the house with it, for Brownie’s use; likewise, when they brewed, they had a stone which they called ‘Brownie’s stane’, wherein there was a little hole into which they poured some wort for a sacrifice to Brownie. The Killmoulis was a similar creature which inhabited mills. Cheneque (native Mexican)

Horned God The term Horned God itself predates Wicca, and is an early 20th-century syncretic term for a horned or antlered anthropomorphic god with pseudohistorical origins[4] who, according to Margaret Murray's 1921 The Witch-Cult in Western Europe, was the deity worshipped by a pan-European witchcraft-based cult, and was demonized into the form of the Devil by the Mediaeval Church. The Horned God has been explored within several psychological theories, and has become a recurrent theme in fantasy literature.[5]:872 Horned God of Wicca[edit] For Wiccans, the Horned God is "the personification of the life force energy in animals and the wild"[6] and is associated with the wilderness, virility and the hunt.[7]:16 Doreen Valiente writes that the Horned God also carries the souls of the dead to the underworld.[8] In the name of the Lady of the Moon, and the Horned Lord of Death and Resurrection[12] Names of the Horned God[edit] Horned God in psychology[edit] Jungian analysis[edit] Humanistic psychology[edit]

Religión indoeuropea Las religiones indoeuropeas son una familia de creencias religiosas politeístas practicadas por los diversos pueblos indoeuropeos (arios) desde la Edad del Bronce. La existencia de similitudes entre ellas, probadas mediante su estudio comparativo así como por la evidencia lingüística común a las lenguas indoeuropeas, sugieren indirectamente la existencia de una religión protoindoeuropea de la cual descienden. Se pueden encontrar suficientes pistas de esta religión ancestral en las coincidencias entre idiomas y religiones propias de los indoeuropeos como para presuponer que esta religión existió, aunque cualquier detalle es una conjetura. Mientras las similares costumbres religiosas entre los indoeuropeos pueden facilitar evidencias de una herencia religiosa compartida, una costumbre compartida no indica necesariamente una fuente común para dicha costumbre; algunas de esas prácticas pueden haber surgido en un proceso de evolución paralelo. Mitología Cosmogonía El Caos Gemelos Gran Diluvio

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