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Immortal Truth

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The Triptych Enigma by Richard Cassaro Classicist Richard Cassaro is a specialist on ancient religions and secret societies. His new book, Written In Stone, reveals never-before-seen visual evidence of a “secret code” hidden in plain view in the architectural facades of the world’s most famous Gothic cathedrals. He says the code conveys an ancient message to posterity which was fully intended by the Freemasons who scholars say built these sacred structures. For a powerful preview, visit www.DeeperTruth.com and download his illuminating PDF Report: Breaking The Cathedral Code, Freemasonry’s Triptych Secret Revealed. An unprecedented new archaeological discovery has been made that ties the world's ancient pyramid-building civilizations together and shows they all practiced the same advanced "Universal Religion." The discovery, on the surface, is a seemingly simple one: it is the discovery of a key architectural parallel they all shared, and which is still visible in the ruins of their temples. You don't have a soul.

mental_floss Blog » History of the U.S.: A Ridiculously Long and Incomplete List of Things Ben Franklin Invented We all remember Ben Franklin as a pretty bright guy who discovered some pretty important stuff. The real question is, what didn’t this polymath genius invent? 1742: Observing the wasteful use of firewood in inefficient colonial fireplaces, he designed the Franklin Stove, which used its iron body to diffuse a much larger proportion of the heat. The stove enabled poor families to save money and be warmer in the winter.1749: Noticing that lightning was attracted to metal and tall objects, Franklin hit on the idea of attaching vertical metal rods to the tops of tall buildings to attract the lightning, thus sparing the roof a direct hit.1752: To prove that lightning was static electricity, Franklin carried out his famous kite experiment with the help of his young son William (nobody ever said he was a responsible parent). He conducted an electrical charge from a key along a wire into a primitive battery. Looking for more fabulous content like this?

castawaycostume photo Must See Imagery: 50 most viral photos of the week Back to article Prev Next tealshoes, Imgur follow guyism: K-MODDL > Tutorials > Reuleaux Triangle If an enormously heavy object has to be moved from one spot to another, it may not be practical to move it on wheels. Instead the object is placed on a flat platform that in turn rests on cylindrical rollers (Figure 1). As the platform is pushed forward, the rollers left behind are picked up and put down in front. An object moved this way over a flat horizontal surface does not bob up and down as it rolls along. Is a circle the only curve with constant width? How to construct a Reuleaux triangle To construct a Reuleaux triangle begin with an equilateral triangle of side s, and then replace each side by a circular arc with the other two original sides as radii (Figure 4). The corners of a Reuleaux triangle are the sharpest possible on a curve with constant width. Other symmetrical curves with constant width result if you start with a regular pentagon (or any regular polygon with an odd number of sides) and follow similar procedures. Figure 1: Platform resting on cylindrical roller

Rader's NUMBERNUT.COM Science Mysteries, Fibonacci Numbers and Golden section in Nature Golden Ratio & Golden Section : : Golden Rectangle : : Golden Spiral Golden Ratio & Golden Section In mathematics and the arts, two quantities are in the golden ratio if the ratio between the sum of those quantities and the larger one is the same as the ratio between the larger one and the smaller. Expressed algebraically: The golden ratio is often denoted by the Greek letter phi (Φ or φ). Golden Rectangle A golden rectangle is a rectangle whose side lengths are in the golden ratio, 1: j (one-to-phi), that is, 1 : or approximately 1:1.618. Golden Spiral In geometry, a golden spiral is a logarithmic spiral whose growth factor b is related to j, the golden ratio. Successive points dividing a golden rectangle into squares lie on a logarithmic spiral which is sometimes known as the golden spiral. Golden Ratio in Architecture and Art Here are few examples: Parthenon, Acropolis, Athens. Detailed explanation about geometrical construction of the Vitruvian Man by Leonardo da Vinci >> Examples: where

College Paper How to write a paper in college/university: 1. Sit in a straight, comfortable chair in a well lit place in front of your computer. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. course, the college, the world at large. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 5am - start hacking on the paper without stopping. 6am -paper is finished. 38. 39.

A Jack Daniels Fishing Story A Jack Daniels Fishing Story I went fishing this morning but after a short time I ran out of worms. Then I saw a cottonmouth with a frog in his mouth. Frogs are good bass bait. Knowing the snake couldn't bite me with the frog in his mouth I grabbed him right behind the head,took the frog, and put it in my bait bucket. Now the dilemma was how to release the snake without getting bit. His eyes rolled back, he went limp. A little later, I felt a nudge on my foot. Life is good in the south... Please visit stories, etc. for more pictures, stories, etc. dalesdesigns.net What does 0^0 (zero raised to the zeroth power) equal? Why do mathematicians and high school teachers disagree Clever student: I know! Now we just plug in x=0, and we see that zero to the zero is one! Cleverer student: No, you’re wrong! which is true since anything times 0 is 0. Cleverest student : That doesn’t work either, because if then is so your third step also involves dividing by zero which isn’t allowed! and see what happens as x>0 gets small. So, since = 1, that means that High School Teacher: Showing that approaches 1 as the positive value x gets arbitrarily close to zero does not prove that . is undefined. does not have a value. Calculus Teacher: For all , we have Hence, That is, as x gets arbitrarily close to (but remains positive), stays at On the other hand, for real numbers y such that , we have that That is, as y gets arbitrarily close to Therefore, we see that the function has a discontinuity at the point . but when we approach (0,0) along the line segment with y=0 and x>0 we get Therefore, the value of is going to depend on the direction that we take the limit. that will make the function ! . as is whatever

Mathematical Atlas: A gateway to Mathematics Welcome! This is a collection of short articles designed to provide an introduction to the areas of modern mathematics and pointers to further information, as well as answers to some common (or not!) questions. The material is arranged in a hierarchy of disciplines, each with its own index page ("blue pages"). To reach the best page for your interests, use whichever of these navigation tools ("purple pages") you prefer: For resources useful in all areas of mathematics try 00: General Mathematics. There is a backlog of articles awaiting editing before they are referenced in the blue pages, but you are welcome to snoop around VIRUS WARNING: The Mathematical Atlas receives but does not send mail using the math-atlas.org domain name. Please bookmark any pages at this site with the URL This URL forces frames; for a frame-free version use

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