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Non-Hybrid Vegetable Fruit Grain Herb Seeds

Non-Hybrid Vegetable Fruit Grain Herb Seeds
Related:  Gardening

Make Your Own Pop Bottle Drip Irrigation System | You Grow Girl The last time I forgot to water my outdoor potted plants and discovered them completely wilted and hanging on the cusp of near death, I decided it was time to take action. Some of the plants on my deck receive a full, searing sun all day long during the hottest mid summer days. While these plants thrive under such conditions if properly taken care of, they will die quickly if they don’t receive enough water. Although it has been unusually rainy this year in these parts, full sun deck plants will still get extremely hot and dry very quickly. One of the best ways to provide a steady water supply to your plants without your constant attention is the gradual watering system or drip irrigation. The materials you will need are as follows: 2 litre plastic soda bottle or water bottle that still has the lidDrill and small drill bitSharp knifeCutting surface Drill 4-8 small holes into the cap of the plastic bottle.

Free Food in Your Yard: Edible Weeds! Popular in Food & Drink Next time you're about to yank an offending plant from your immaculate garden of perennials, think twice: you just might be looking at dinner. Free dinner. Oh, I know what you're thinking: damn hippies! Always eating anything and everything that grows under the sun. What's next? Well, my friend, I may be a bit of a hippie, but that doesn't mean that you too can't partake in the pleasures of foraged food. I love the idea of going out in the wild to find food. Japanese Knotweed This stuff grows like a forest in the lot next to my house, and occasionally pops up in my yard. Knotweed is a crazy plant. The neighbor who told me the name of the weed also told us that it was edible, but that only the shoots were really worth eating. It turns out that this isn't true — I mean, I'm sure it's invasiveness is awful, but you can eat it when it gets big. I did manage to get a few shoots that were young, growing around my rhododendron. And it's good for you! Purlsane Dandelions

Seeds of Change Homepage How to Grow The Top 10 Most Nutritious Vegetables in Your Garden By Colleen Vanderlinden Treehugger A perfectly ripe, juicy tomato, still warm from the sun. Sweet carrots, pulled from the garden minutes (or even seconds!) before they’re eaten. And don’t let the lack of a yard stop you – all of them can be grown in containers as well. 1. Broccoli is high in calcium, iron, and magnesium, as well as Vitamin A, B6, and C. How to Grow BroccoliGrow Broccoli in Containers: One broccoli plant per pot, pots should be 12 to 16 inches deep.What to Watch Out For: Cabbage worm. 2. There is nothing like peas grown right in your own garden – the tender sweetness of a snap pea just plucked from the vine is unlike anything you can buy in at a store. How to Grow PeasGrow Peas in Containers: Sow peas approximately 2 inches apart in a pot that is at least 10 inches deep. 3. While snap beans (green beans/wax beans) are a great addition to any garden, it’s the beans we grow as dried beans that are real nutritional powerhouses. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. OK, I cheated here.

Organic Gardening Information Build a Backyard Waterfall and Stream Step 1: Overview 1 of 1 Completed stream Placing rocks We've all stopped, gazed and listened upon encountering a rippling brook or waterfall—to soak up the serenity that nature provides. We designed this stream to eliminate the filtering and cleaning maintenance that comes with ponds. You can complete this project successfully even if it's your first water feature. Caution! Although these pools are shallow, they can be a drowning hazard for small children. Step 2: Select a location Sit in a favorite spot and visualize where a stream with waterfalls would fit into your landscape—perhaps near a patio or deck. Planning elements to consider: Foundation If your soil is easy to dig, then excavate the entire project. Slope Very little slope is needed (minimum 2 in. drop per 10 ft. of stream). Size Plan your stream size first to determine how much water the lower basin and upper pool must hold when the pump is off. Sound For a babbling brook sound, use a waterfall height of 2 to 4 in. 1 of 2 2 of 2

5 Secrets to a ‘No-work’ Garden | Eartheasy Blog - StumbleUpon It took over 20 years of gardening to realize that I didn’t have to work so hard to achieve a fruitful harvest. As the limitless energy of my youth gradually gave way to the physical realities of mid-life, the slow accretion of experience eventually led to an awareness that less work can result in greater crop yields. Inspired in part by Masanobu Fukuoka’s book, One Straw Revolution, my family experimented with gardening methods which could increase yields with less effort. Fukuoka spent over three decades perfecting his so-called “do-nothing” technique: commonsense, sustainable practices that all but eliminate the use of pesticides, fertilizer, tillage, and perhaps most significantly, wasteful effort. Here are the strategies we used which enabled us to greatly increase our garden yield, while requiring less time and less work. 1. With ‘no-till’ gardening, weeding is largely eliminated. 2. Gardeners are always on the lookout for free sources of clean organic mulch to add to their garden.

Welcome to Victory Seeds - Rare, Open-pollinated & Heirloom Garden Seeds Why I Use Epsom Salt in the Garden *Why I Use Epsom Salt in the Garden*By: LL4e14 June 2004 I wanted to show everyone what a difference it makes with and without with only water being added all of these plants was planted on the same day and time. I am showing you ones I am growing with the sq. ft. method. All of these photo's were just taken today. I do have several baby tomatoes now. However now the non Epsom salt plants will be fed it also this was only to show those what a difference it makes. In the Garden House Plants Mix one teaspoon per gallon of water and feed to the plants every two to four weeks. Garden startup Sprinkle approximately one cup per 100 square feet. (10’x10’) and mix into soil before planting. Tomatoes Apply one tablespoon per foot of height for each plant every two weeks. Roses Apply one teaspoon per foot of height for each plant every two weeks. Evergreens, Azaleas, Rhododendrons Apply one tablespoon per nine square feet (3’x3’) over the root zone every two to four weeks.

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