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Centre for Social Innovation

The Rise of the Sharing Communities Creative Commons photo by Lobkovs As the sharing economy picks up momentum, its reach has become global. In cities and towns around the world, people are creating ways to share everything from baby clothes to boats, hardware to vacation homes. From neighborhood-level cooperatives to global organizations, these groups work to bring sharing into the mainstream. What follows is a far-from-exhaustive list of sharing advocacy groups around the world. Ouishare With hubs in Paris, London, Berlin, Barcelona, Rome and Brussels, Ouishare is an international network of entrepreneurs, citizens, activists, journalists and designers working toward the development of the collaborative economy. “To me, the question is not so much about whether access is better than ownership,” says Ouishare co-founder Antonon Leonard. Leonard stresses that community “is everything” and that Ouishare is built around people who do things, not those who say they will do things. Let’s Collaborate!

Giving Global Impact Awards Global Impact Awards support organizations using technology and innovative solutions to tackle some of the world's toughest human challenges. We look for nimble, entrepreneurial organizations that have a specific project that tests a big idea and a brilliant team with a healthy disregard for the impossible. Disaster Relief In addition to Crisis Response Efforts, we also provide grants to support critical first responders and long-term relief efforts. Academic Support We invest in faculties conducting world-class research through our Research Awards program. Community Affairs We support organizations, such as schools, nonprofits and small businesses in the communities surrounding our offices and data centers around the world.

Jean Lave, Etienne Wenger and communities of practice contents: introduction · communities of practice · legitimate peripheral participation and situated learning · learning organizations and learning communities · conclusion · references · links · how to cite this article Many of the ways we have of talking about learning and education are based on the assumption that learning is something that individuals do. Furthermore, we often assume that learning ‘has a beginning and an end; that it is best separated from the rest of our activities; and that it is the result of teaching’ (Wenger 1998: 3). But how would things look if we took a different track? Jean Lave was (and is) a social anthropologist with a strong interest in social theory, based at the University of California, Berkeley. Etienne Wenger was a teacher who joined the Institute for Research on Learning, Palo Alto having gained a Ph.D. in artificial intelligence from the University of California at Irvine. Communities of practice The characteristics of communities of practice

La théorie des communautés de pratique - Etienne Wenger The dynamics of managing/nurturing networks of practice Image by D'Arcy Norman via Flickr I received a beautiful article (thanks to Julie Ferguson!). Just got a tip through the comments that it's also online. This is the full reference to the article: Agterberg, M., Van den Hooff, B., Huysman, M., & Soekijad, M. (2010). The authors make a distinction between NoPs and CoPs; networks of practice and communities of practice. CoP or NoP doesn't matter, there are important insights into the management interventions to support NoPs (or CoPs I'd say...). I've never held the belief that communities are fully self-emergent and that you can not intervene/facilitate in communities of practice. What are the findings from the study of 22 NoPs in one organisation? 4. Personally I feel relational and structural embeddedness are very connected to each other and both relate to the level of social capital. But what did the study find out about management interventions in all these types of embeddedness?

Communauté de pratique Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Pour les articles homonymes, voir COP. La théorie des communautés de pratiques formalisée par Wenger (1998)[1] s'inscrit dans une évolution épistémologique qui a conduit le domaine de la gestion des connaissances d'une vision technocentrée vers une vision anthropocentrée. Cette théorie prône une perspective sociale de l’apprentissage, insérée dans les pratiques collectives au sein des communautés de pratique. Cette position offre un cadre original de lecture des phénomènes d’apprentissage collectif et permet d’envisager celui-ci sous un angle différent. Wenger (2005), développe le concept de communautés de pratique comme un groupe de personnes qui travaillent ensemble (à travers des plateformes internet par exemple tels que des forums, des vidéo-conférences, des courriels…) et qui sont en fait conduites à inventer constamment des solutions locales aux problèmes rencontrés dans leur pratiques professionnelles. ou autres. Portail de la sociologie

Knowledge Networks: Introduction Editors, Paul Hildreth and Chris Kimble Publisher, Idea Group Publishing Hard cover ISBN: 159140200X Soft cover ISBN: 1591402700 The current environment for organizations is one that is characterised by uncertainty and continuous change. This rapid and dynamic pace of change is forcing organizations that were accustomed to structure and routine to become ones that must improvise solutions quickly and correctly. To respond to this changed environment organizations are moving away from the structures of the past that are based on hierarchies, discrete groups and teams and moving towards those based on more fluid and emergent organizational forms such as networks and communities. In the mid 1990s, a new approach called Knowledge Management (KM) began to emerge (Ponzi and Koenig, 2002). LPP is both complex and composite and although Lave and Wenger saw LPP as an inseparable whole, it is helpful to consider the three aspects, legitimation, peripherality and participation separately. Evolution

CoP: Best Practices by Etienne Wenger [Published in the "Systems Thinker," June 1998] You are a claims processor working for a large insurance company. You are good at what you do, but although you know where your paycheck comes from, the corporation mainly remains an abstraction for you. The group you actually work for is a relatively small community of people who share your working conditions. It is with this group that you learn the intricacies of your job, explore the meaning of your work, construct an image of the company, and develop a sense of yourself as a worker. You are an engineer working on two projects within your business unit. You are a CEO and, of course, you are responsible for the company as a whole. We now recognize knowledge as a key source of competitive advantage in the business world, but we still have little understanding of how to create and leverage it in practice. We frequently say that people are an organization's most important resource. Defining Communities of Practice Dr.

CoP: Best Practices by Etienne Wenger [Published in the "Systems Thinker," June 1998] You are a claims processor working for a large insurance company. You are good at what you do, but although you know where your paycheck comes from, the corporation mainly remains an abstraction for you. You are an engineer working on two projects within your business unit. You are a CEO and, of course, you are responsible for the company as a whole. We now recognize knowledge as a key source of competitive advantage in the business world, but we still have little understanding of how to create and leverage it in practice. We frequently say that people are an organization's most important resource. However, they are a company's most versatile and dynamic knowledge resource and form the basis of an organization's ability to know and learn. Defining Communities of Practice Communities of practice are everywhere. Communities of practice develop around things that matter to people. Communities of Practice in Organizations Dr.

Communautés de pratique : un partage des connaissances idéal La compétitivité d'une enteprise dépend directement de la qualité des connaissances auxquelles ses employés ont accès : être mieux informé que la concurrence est un objectif majeur pour chaque firme. Ce qui explique le succès des outils de partage des connaissances - ou KM. Pour Etienne Wenger cependant - l'un des gourous du collaboratif -, les managers ont une idée bien trop restrictive du partage des connaissances, qui se cantonne souvent à des bibliothèques statiques, des répertoires de documents écrits. Pourtant, "ce sont les savoirs dynamiques qui font la différence - explique posément E.Wenger dans une article de Systems Thinker. Ce qui requiert la participation de personnes totalement immergées dans le processus de création, raffinement, communication et utilisation des connaissances". Un mystérieux lieu d'échange Ces acteurs échangent leurs savoirs - sans même que l'entreprise en soit consciente - au sein de "communautés de pratique".

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