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Sound Properties (Amplitude, Period, Frequency, Wavelength)

Sound Properties (Amplitude, Period, Frequency, Wavelength)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_xZZt99MzY

Related:  Music Theory

Harmony practice 3 Simple entry positioning:set the current voice - bass, tenor, alto, soprano, then select a note, or rest, and click a position in the score. Should the entry result incorrect, keep the mouse button down, or click the entry again, and drag it to the desired location. Alternatively, select the repitch tool (an orange coloured arrow in the Accessory tools palette) and perform dragging. Simple entry erasing: set the current voice - bass, tenor, alto, soprano, then right click an entry, select Delete item from the fast menu. Alternatively, use the eraser tool (from the Accessory tools palette).

Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People by Toby W. Rush This page includes links to each of the individual Music Theory pages I've created in PDF form. This is a work in progress; I am writing new ones regularly and fixing errors and omissions on existing ones as I find them. If you find them useful for your theory studies, you are welcome to use them, and if you find errors or have suggestions, I invite you to contact me. 6 Open Source Software Projects of (Musical) Notation As it's been pointed out before, there seems to be a sizable overlap between open source hardware and software enthusiasts and amateur musicians. And while some of you are making music through the tried-and-true "let's see what that button does" method, there are a few of you who might be interested in composing music the old-fashioned way -- digitally producing paper-based music sheets. Whether you're writing music for the guitar, learning how to improvise jazz solos, or writing entire music scores, chances are that one of the pieces of open source software listed below can make the process a little easier.

Sight-reading Caravaggio's Rest on the Flight into Egypt (1594–96) Terminology[edit] Sight-reading[edit] Authors in music literature commonly use the term "sight-reading" generically for "the ability to read and produce both instrumental and vocal music at first sight ... the conversion of musical information from sight to sound" (Udtaisuk 2005). Udtaisuk and some other authors prefer the use of the more specific terms "sight-playing" and "sight-singing" where applicable. Chord (music) Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition "Promenade", is a piece showing an explicit chord progression.(Nattiez 1990, p. 218) Play In the medieval era, early Christian hymns featured organum (which used the simultaneous perfect intervals of a fourth, a fifth, and an octave[13]), with chord progressions and harmony an incidental result of the emphasis on melodic lines during the medieval and then Renaissance (15-17th centuries).[7][14] The Romantic period, the 19th century, featured increased chromaticism.[7] Composers began to use secondary dominants in the Baroque, and they became common in the Romantic period.[19] Many contemporary popular Western genres continue to rely on simple diatonic harmony, though far from universally:[20] notable exceptions include the music of film scores, which often use chromatic, atonal or post-tonal harmony, and modern jazz (especially circa 1960), in which chords may include up to seven notes (and occasionally more).[21]

Polychord Bitonal polychord: F major on top of C major.[1] Play The use of polychords may suggest bitonality or polytonality. Harmonic parallelism may suggest bichords. Polychords: Em, EbM, EbM, and DM over Dm.[8] Play Quartal and quintal harmony Four note quartal chord Play . Analysis[edit] Definition[edit] Scale (music) Pattern of intervals in the C-major scale Play A measure of the width of each scale step provides a method to classify scales.

Glossary of musical terminology This is a list of musical terms that are likely to be encountered in printed scores, music reviews, and program notes. Most of the terms are Italian (see also Italian musical terms used in English), in accordance with the Italian origins of many European musical conventions. Sometimes, the special musical meanings of these phrases differ from the original or current Italian meanings. Most of the other terms are taken from French and German, indicated by "Fr." and "Ger Understanding Basic Music Theory - Free online course Understanding Basic Music Theory is a comprehensive insight into the fundamental notions of music theory: music notation, rules of harmony, ear training, etc. It covers most of the topics needed to understand and develop your musical skills - with your favorite training tool EarMaster of course! This fantastic mine of information was written by Catherine Schmidt-Jones et al. and originally published on OpenStax CNX. Course Introduction Although it is significantly expanded from "Introduction to Music Theory", this course still covers only the bare essentials of music theory. Music is a very large subject, and the advanced theory that students will want to pursue after mastering the basics will vary greatly.

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