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10 facts about infidelity, as divulged by Helen Fisher

10 facts about infidelity, as divulged by Helen Fisher
While talking about her research on love at TED2006, Helen Fisher mentioned the issue of infidelity. Here, she dives into the topic of cheating in much more detail. Photo: Robert Leslie Love isn’t so much an emotion, says Helen Fisher in her TED Talk. No, love is a brain system — one of three that that’s related to mating and reproduction. Helen Fisher: Why we love, why we cheatIt’s those other two systems that explain why human beings are capable of infidelity even as we so highly value love. We see infidelity on big and small screens all the time and, on occasion, we see evidence of it in real life too. 1. Further reading: Anatomy of Love, by Helen FisherThe Marriage-Go-Round, by Andrew J. 2. 3. Why We Love, by Helen Fisher 4. Nisa: The Life and Words of a ! 5. “Justifications for extramarital relationships: The association between attitudes, behaviors, and gender,” by Shirley Glass and Thomas Wright in the Journal of Sex Research 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Anatomy of Love, by Helen Fisher Why Him?

http://blog.ted.com/2014/01/23/10-facts-about-infidelity-helen-fisher/

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