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Collections in Melbourne: A Guide to Commonwealth Government Records - Collections in Melbourne: A Guide to Commonwealth Records Celia Blake Published by the National Archives of Australia This is guide number 8 in the series of research guides published by the National Archives. The Melbourne office of the National Archives of Australia holds a wealth of material that will interest both professional and family historians. The collection is especially rich because the original seat of the Commonwealth Parliament was located in Melbourne. 40 maps that explain the world Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable. A majority are original to this blog, with others from a variety of sources. I've included a link for further reading on close to every one. [Additional read: How Ukraine became Ukraine and 40 more maps that explain the world]

Everything you ever wanted know about ORCID . . . but were afraid to ask ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is a nonprofit organization launched as a community effort to solve the name ambiguity problem in research and scholarly communications.1 Name ambiguity is a problem for several reasons: Shared names. Visualization: Motion Chart - Google Chart Tools - Google Code Overview A dynamic chart to explore several indicators over time. The chart is rendered within the browser using Flash. Note for Developers: Because of Flash security settings, this (and all Flash-based visualizations) might not work correctly when accessed from a file location in the browser (e.g., rather than from a web server URL (e.g., This is typically a testing issue only.

1 Historical background Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution: Report of the Expert Panel Millions of non-indigenous Australians have joined with us in the search for a better relationship based on equity and justice. Australians at every level of our society have put up their hands to be counted as supporters of a nation that holds as its core value a society based on mutual respect, tolerance and justice. ... I am convinced that true reconciliation that is not based upon truth will leave us as a diminished nation. And I ... am convinced that such reconciliation is possible. Patrick Dodson1

A Medieval Atlas By Melissa Snell Nothing helps bring the past into focus quite like a well-executed map. Here at the Medieval History site, I've provided some maps depicting parts of the world as it was during the Middle Ages. Human Rights Library- University of Minnesota The University of Minnesota Human Rights Center has developed this Library with generous support from the Ford Foundation, Samuel Heins, the JEHT Foundation, the John Merck Fund, the Joyce Mertz-Gilmore Foundation, the Open Society Institute, the Sigrid Rausing Trust, the U.S. Institute of Peace, the University of Minnesota Law School (including the University of Minnesota Law Library), the Weyerhaeuser Family Foundation, the West Group, JWECF (Japan World Exhibition Commemorative Fund), and other contributors. In-kind advertising support has been provided through a Google Grant award. The Library also commemorates the pioneering work of Diana Vincent- Daviss.

The five funniest moments in Australian history History, let's be blunt, is hilarious. It's hilarious for the same reason life itself is hilarious: it's filled with weirdos and idiots screwing everything up in the worst ways possible. But the beauty of history as a comedic resource is that it all happened ages ago, so you don't have to pretend to feel sorry for the people it happened to. Many people believe that Australian history is a boring and colourless saga and that our nation lacks historical periods or events with the rich humorous potential of, say, the English Civil War, or the Spanish Inquisition.

State Library of Victoria, Access from home, Log in Log in as a Library member In order to access ejournals, databases and ebooks from home, you need to be a Library member with a current State Library card. Remember, the eresources are for private research and study purposes by Victorian residents only. Become a Library member Not a member of the Library?

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Worst mass murder of police in Australian history remembered Updated Police have gathered in a remote forest near the southern New South Wales town of Braidwood to mark 150 years since the worst mass murder of police officers in Australian history. On January 9, 1867, four special constables assigned to catch the notorious Clarke Gang were ambushed and killed near Jinden, New South Wales. Special Constables John Carroll, Patrick Kennagh, Eneas McDonnell and John Phegan were the police killed in the exchange.

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