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Training the Brain to Listen: A Practical Strategy for Student Learning and Classroom Management

Training the Brain to Listen: A Practical Strategy for Student Learning and Classroom Management
Image credit: iStockphoto Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. During the school year, students are expected to listen to and absorb vast amounts of content. But how much time has been devoted to equipping students with ways to disconnect from their own internal dialogue (self-talk) and to focus their attention fully on academic content that is being presented? Explicit instruction on cognitive strategies that can help students learn how to learn may have a positive impact on both academic performance and classroom management by emphasizing that students are in charge of their own behavior and learning. The Anatomy and Psychology of Listening Teaching Students to Focus and Listen

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/training-the-brain-to-listen-donna-wilson

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