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The secret to creativity, intelligence and scientific thinking: Being able to make connections

The secret to creativity, intelligence and scientific thinking: Being able to make connections
10.3K Flares Filament.io 10.3K Flares × When we shared this image from the @buffer Twitter account recently, it got me thinking. The Tweet resulted in over 1,000 retweets, which somehow was an indication that a lot of people seemed to agree with this statement. There’s a key difference between knowledge and experience and it’s best described like this: The original is from cartoonist Hugh MacLeod, who came up with such a brilliant way to express a concept that’s often not that easy to grasp. The image makes a clear point—that knowledge alone is not useful unless we can make connections between what we know. Lots of great writers, artists and scientists have talked about the importance of collecting ideas and bits of knowledge from the world around us, and making connections between those dots to fuel creative thinking and new ideas. To start with though, I want to look at some research that shows intelligence is closely linked with the physical connections in our brains. 1. 2. 3. P.S.

http://blog.bufferapp.com/connections-in-the-brain-understanding-creativity-and-intelligenceconnections

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Magic and Mystery, Chaos and Complexity Paradox My dictionary says a paradox is a seemingly absurd or contradictory statement even if it is well founded. In life there are many things that appear absurd and contradictory that are in fact real and true. These paradoxes mean we live in a world of mystery where there is always something new to learn and experience. Every question answered opens up a new question to be solved. Tonight I will talk about some of those paradoxes and how they might help us understand the world we live in.

Re-inventing Innovation at Cisco? Embrace Openness, Small Companies! “We believe one of the key strategies for reinventing innovation at Cisco is to embrace openness.” This sentence by Mala Anand, a SVP at Cisco caught my interest as I read her blog post about the Cisco Entrepreneur-in-Residence program. I followed the link to the program and I found this to be quite interesting.

Why the Failure of Systems Thinking Should Inform the Future of Design Thinking "You never learn by doing something right ‘cause you already know how to do it. You only learn from making mistakes and correcting them." Russell Ackoff Design and "design thinking" is gaining recognition as an important integrative concept in management practice and education. Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice.

"Real" Sustainability: The New Disruptors By scaling up social enterprise solutions, corporations can promote real sustainability and CSR. By David Wilcox The CSRwire community recently participated in a Twitter chat in response to this query: “What will disrupt your year?” Leading experts gathered to discuss CSR and sustainability trends in 2014. Over an hour’s time, a range of assumptions and common frames emerged. 5 ways 'systems thinking' can jumpstart action From climate change and deforestation to collapsing fisheries, species extinction, and poisons in food and water, our society is unsustainable and getting worse fast. Many advocate that overcoming these problems requires the development of systems thinking. We've long known that we live on a finite "spaceship Earth" in which "there is no away" and "everything is connected to everything else." The challenge lies in moving from slogans about systems to meaningful methods to understand complexity, facilitate individual and organizational learning, and catalyze the changes needed to create a sustainable society in which all can thrive. Here's how the world operates as a system -- and how businesses can respond effectively to the challenges we face. The world as a system

The Problem with the Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Hierarchy - David Weinberger by David Weinberger | 9:00 AM February 2, 2010 The data-information-knowledge-wisdom hierarchy seemed like a really great idea when it was first proposed. But its rapid acceptance was in fact a sign of how worried we were about the real value of the information systems we had built at such great expense.

5 Steps to Build a Creative Business from Scratch Image credit: Shutterstock Any economist will tell you that the creative sector is a leading component of worldwide economic growth, employment and trade. Over the last decade, there has been a significant shift from individuals choosing to work in traditional vocations such as health care to investing in the creative sector. Operating a business where your intellectual capital is your golden ticket requires a calculated approach that differs from the stock standard business model. Here are five steps to establish a creative business from scratch: Systems Thinking by HainesCentre.com Approaching Business with Systems Thinking Businesses promote and sell products and services, which includes solutions to a problem or benefit of a product. In a lot of businesses, expertise is an key capability that leads to the ability to provide optimum service. That is why some companies create functional teams within their corporate structure to ensure that expert service is provided. The team of workers should be strategically placed so that their expertise can be appropriately utilized. Another reason is to make each employee accountable and responsible for their specific role.

DIKW Pyramid The DIKW Pyramid, also known variously as the "DIKW Hierarchy", "Wisdom Hierarchy", the "Knowledge Hierarchy", the "Information Hierarchy", and the "Knowledge Pyramid",[1] refers loosely to a class of models[2] for representing purported structural and/or functional relationships between data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. "Typically information is defined in terms of data, knowledge in terms of information, and wisdom in terms of knowledge".[1] History[edit] "The presentation of the relationships among data, information, knowledge, and sometimes wisdom in a hierarchical arrangement has been part of the language of information science for many years. Although it is uncertain when and by whom those relationships were first presented, the ubiquity of the notion of a hierarchy is embedded in the use of the acronym DIKW as a shorthand representation for the data-to-information-to-knowledge-to-wisdom transformation

The World's Most Innovative Companies 2014 If you Google the phrase "faith-based businesses," the results point to companies that pursue a religious agenda. But there's another kind of faith in business: the belief that a product or service can radically remake an industry, change consumer habits, challenge economic assumptions. Proof for such innovative leaps is thin, payoffs are long in coming (if they come at all), and doubting Thomases abound. Today, pundits fret about an innovation bubble. Some overvalued companies and overhyped inventions will eventually tumble and money will be lost. Yet breakthrough progress often requires wide-eyed hope.

MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers Posted in Medical Device Assembly by Chris Wiltz on November 8, 2013 Adopting a systems thinking approach to product development can help medical device manufacturers embrace new opportunities in a rapidly changing marketplace. Clayton Christensen, author of The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Prescription, has shown that failure results from being slow to react and embrace new opportunities in the market in a way that addresses the disruptive impact of rapid changes in technology. The healthcare industry ecosystem is changing –with potentially radical implications for your products.

Information Overload's 2,300-Year-Old History - Ann Blair by Ann Blair | 10:45 AM March 14, 2011 We’re all worried about the costs of information overload and we typically associate these problems with new digital technologies. But actually information overload has very deep roots: signs of information overload were present already in the accumulation of manuscript texts in pre-modern cultures and were further accelerated by the introduction of printing (in the 15th century in the case of Europe).

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