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English tenses - learn English,tenses,grammar,charts

English tenses - learn English,tenses,grammar,charts

http://languagelearningbase.com/186/english-tenses

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Use six different tenses in English Students often learn just one piece of grammar in a lesson. Most of them master that day’s subject and move on to the next. But, when the time for revision comes, they often don’t remember what they’ve learnt. For example, two weeks ago my class encountered an exercise in which several tenses were revised. First, they demanded that I re-explain the grammar and then they seemed really confused about what form they should use. ADVERT: 5 Grammar Rules That Show Off Your Smarts - Grammarly Blog English grammar confuses the best of us. Native English speakers have the luxury of knowing by ear that he sees, I see, and they see are correct but will mix up who and whom. Professional writers rarely memorize every grammar rule; rather, they review them from time to time to ensure they apply the rules correctly.

The difference between present simple and continuous tenses I have already created two posts on the difference between the present simple and continuous tenses. There are Present simple or present continuous tense – improved and Present simple and continuous tenses posts. Both of them are good but as I have come up with a new idea, I want to share it with you in this post. English Grammar Tenses: Stories, Exercises and Answers Welcome to the English Grammar Tenses – The Ultimate Resource! One of the easiest ways to teach and learn grammar is through stories. Click Here for Step-by-Step Rules, Stories and Exercises to Practice All English Tenses So we at Really Learn English made this huge collection of stories and exercises available for you, completely free of charge. You can read the stories online, download the story PDF files, print and use them by yourself or with your students, and check the answers using the answer key. All we ask in return, is that if you find this resource useful, please link to it and share it with your students, colleagues, and anyone else who may benefit from it.

Chomsky Was Right, NYU Researchers Find: We Do Have a “Grammar” in Our Head A team of neuroscientists has found new support for MIT linguist Noam Chomsky’s decades-old theory that we possess an “internal grammar” that allows us to comprehend even nonsensical phrases. “One of the foundational elements of Chomsky’s work is that we have a grammar in our head, which underlies our processing of language,” explains David Poeppel, the study’s senior researcher and a professor in New York University’s Department of Psychology. “Our neurophysiological findings support this theory: we make sense of strings of words because our brains combine words into constituents in a hierarchical manner—a process that reflects an ‘internal grammar’ mechanism.” The research, which appears in the latest issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, builds on Chomsky’s 1957 work, Syntactic Structures (1957).

English Grammar Pill: How to use the present perfect tenses correctly In my last Grammar Pill post, I wrote about the English past tenses and hopefully gave you an idea of how to use the tenses correctly. The post is so far my most successful article having been viewed over 40,000 times and shared over 10,000 times on Facebook!! Thank you for sharing my post. Verb master board game Verb master board game is intended to replace drills. The aim of this game is to help students learn to form verb tenses. While drills are boring, board games are interesting and fun. Thus, students practise the grammar forms and enjoy it. The great advantage of the Verb master game is the fact that the game is nearly universal.

The Farmer and the Fortune Teller: Using stories to teach grammar – Jason Anderson – Teacher, teacher educator and author Some of us love grammar lessons, but others… If you, or your learners, fall into the second category, one great way to make grammar meaningful, interesting and even edifying is to adapt stories to include a little grammar that you can then extract and analyse. Stories provide for ‘Context, Analysis and Practice’ (C-A-P: something I’ll be talking about more at IATEFL Glasgow 2017, watch this space).

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