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Plot Development: How to write the climax and ending of your novel.

Plot Development: How to write the climax and ending of your novel.
by Glen C. Strathy* Plot development is something you should think about after you have written a brief plot outline (Part 3). In this article, we're going to consider how to make sure the plot of your novel incorporates a satisfying climax and resolution. Many writers, especially pantsers, don't like to think about how their plot develops until they've written most of the first draft, preferring to let the ending evolve organically out of what comes before. Others may plan an ending ahead of time, but they prefer to rely on instinct, feeling, and a lot of trial and error rather than any kind of theory. I believe, however, that you can save yourself a lot of time and effort in the long run by making a few decisions about how your plot develops and the nature of your story early on. Of course, your ending must make emotional and logical sense. Will Your Novel End Happily, Unhappily, Or Somewhere In Between? If the answer is no, then in classical terms, your novel will be a tragedy. 1. 2. 3.

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