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Motivating speaking activities for lower levels

Motivating speaking activities for lower levels
Planning time has been shown to increase production in speaking tasks. Lower level learners often find it especially difficult to speak spontaneously, so these activities incorporate 'thinking time' during which learners can prepare for speaking by planning what they are going to say, and asking the teacher or using a dictionary to look up missing vocabulary. The following activities are relatively short, with minimal materials preparation time for the teacher. They are designed for use as a warmer or a filler in the middle or at the end of a class. 1. Definitions lists This activity is good for activating existing vocabulary or revising vocabulary studied in previous lessons. Procedure Choose a vocabulary topic (this can be vocabulary you have recently studied or a topic you want to introduce). A faster-moving, fun alternative to this activity is a team game. 2. 3. This is a variation on the above activity and is great for practising adjectives. 4. 5. 6. Related:  Speaking, pronunciation

The Cancer-Test Kid After a family friend died of pancreatic cancer, high school sophomore Jack Andraka invented a diagnostic strip that could detect the disease in its early stages. WHIZ KID: Jack Andraka’s tireless work in the Johns Hopkins University lab of pathologist Anirban Maitra paid off in the form of a $75,000 scholarship.COURTESY OF JACK ANDRAKAIn the spring of 2011, 15-year-old Jack Andraka had a lot on his mind. A close friend of the family, a man who was like an uncle to Andraka, had recently died of pancreatic cancer. Reading up on the disease, the then high school freshman discovered that around 85 percent of pancreatic cancers are diagnosed too late, when patients have less than a 2 percent chance of survival. The reason, Andraka learned, was that the best tools for early detection are both expensive and woefully inaccurate. “I was like, ‘There has to be a better way than this really crappy test,’” says Andraka, currently a sophomore at North County High School in Glen Burnie, Maryland.

Oral presentation Melissa: Hi, everyone! Today I would like to talk about how to become the most popular teen in school. Firstly, I think getting good academic results is the first factor to make you become popular since, having a good academic result, your teacher will award you in front of your schoolmates. Then, your schoolmates will know who you are and maybe they would like to get to know you because they want to learn something good from you. Secondly, I think participating in school clubs and student unions can help to make you become popular, since after participating in these school clubs or student union, people will know who you are and it can help you to make friends all around the school, no matter senior forms or junior forms. In conclusion, I think to become the most popular teen in school we need to have good academic results and also participate in school clubs and student union. Kelvin: Good evening, everyone! But, should the government make it illegal?

Controlled oral practice in ELT – what happened to drilling? [This article was originally published as What happened to drilling? in the BELTA Bulletin in October 2014. It’s available on-line for BELTA members here. It’s reprinted here with the permission of the editor.] As communicative language teachers we are told that drilling is bad. We’re told it is pointless, uncommunicative and deprived of any meaning. Before you jump on the bandwagon and continue the rant, I’d like you to pause for a moment and ask yourself whether drilling really has to be so horribly boring and uncommunicative as we are repeatedly told. In this article I’m going to first look at eight common criticisms of drilling and controlled oral practice (COP) and show why they are not all together accurate. Let’s then look at the criticisms. Criticism: Too much emphasis put on accuracy, hindering the development of real communication skills. Having dealt with some of the most common criticisms, let’s look at examples of COP. Substitution Drills: T: midday T: she T: he/drinking Related

Motivating teenagers I will link three practical classroom activities to the ideas of American Psychologist Carl Rogers. The ideas of Carl Rogers Types of motivation and teenagers Ways to improve motivation:Journals - empathy Using photos - authenticity Music - acceptance The ideas of Carl Rogers Rogers (1957) outlined 3 attitudinal qualities that a teacher, or in his words, a facilitator, should have to assist the learning process. They are empathy (seeing things from the students' viewpoint), authenticity (being yourself) and acceptance (of students' ideas and opinions). Types of motivation and teenagers It is widely agreed that motivation has a great effect on a student's capacity to learn. Ways to improve motivation Journals - Empathy Journal writing can create wonderful opportunities to find out more about your students' lives. Joanna Budden, British Council, Spain I will link three practical classroom activities to the ideas of American Psychologist Carl Rogers. Ways to improve motivation

Hail the Kale! More Vegan Grub on the High Street 27 Sep Good news for sandwich fans! PETA UK Vegan Food Award winner and national fast-food chain Pret A Manger has added even more vegan goodies to its offerings! A new Super Greens sandwich, featuring kale, spinach and avocado, joins its Naked Avocado Bloomer as a vegan option on its sandwich shelf. It’s also added more varieties of vegan soup: the beetroot and horseradish soup, South Indian tomato and spice soup, smoky root vegetable and bean soup and butternut squash and sage soup are all delicious and free of animal products. Pret has also added a page to its “What Can I Eat” guide that details all the choices for hungry herbivores. Earlier this month, Pret won a PETA UK Vegan Food Award, which highlighted the best food for compassionate eaters. The number of plant-based foods will only grow as more and more Britons make the compassionate decision to go vegan. Share This

Student presentations | TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC Why I get students to do presentations Syllabus fit Planning a presentation lesson Aims Classroom Management Assessment Conclusion Why I get students to do presentationsPresentations are a great way to have students practise all language systems areas (vocabulary, grammar, discourse and phonology) and skills (speaking, reading, writing and listening). They also build confidence, and presenting is a skill that most people will need in the world of work. I find that students who are good presenters are better communicators all round, since they are able to structure and express their ideas clearly. Presentation skills are extremely useful both in and outside the classroom. Syllabus fit Normally the presentation will come towards the end of a lesson or series of lessons that focus on a particular language or skill area. Planning a presentation lessonNormally a presentation lesson will have an outline like this: Shy students cannot present alone Why are you making the presentation? And so on.

ESL Song Lessons - tefltunes.com - Songs For Teaching Grammar ESL and EFL teachers looking for inspiration for lesson planning will find this list of songs to teach English grammar we’ve compiled a useful resource. Highlighted are songs available as complete ESL song lesson plans here on tefltunes.com. Songs for teaching present simple Eric Clapton / Wonderful Tonight (lyrics) The Beatles / She Loves You (lyrics) Bette Middler / From A Distance (lyrics) Songs for teaching present continuous Rod Stewart / Sailing (lyrics) Fool’s Garden / Lemon Tree (lyrics) Suzanne Vega / Tom’s Diner (lyrics) Songs for teaching past simple The Beatles / Yellow Submarine (lyrics) Gloria Gaynor / I Will Survive (lyrics) Celine Dion / Because You Loved Me (lyrics) Songs for teaching past continuous John Lennon / Jealous Guy (lyrics) Oasis / Champagne Supernova (lyrics) Aerosmith / Cryin’ (lyrics) Songs for teaching present perfect Songs for teaching present perfect continuous Songs for teaching past perfect Songs for teaching used to Songs for teaching going to future

IATEFL 2018: Safe Speaking Environments - What? Why? How? | WoBL Published 9 April 2018 In our first post from IATEFL 2018, we’re sharing the talk from Professor of Psycholinguistics, Zoltán Dörnyei, on what exactly Safe Speaking Environments are and why you should care. The talk looks at creating a psychological environment in the classroom which might make students’ lives easier. Create suitable conditions in accordance with the main tenets of group dynamics, andApply the principles of safe speaking environments What conditions need to be in place so we can start implementing a safe speaking environment? Zoltán talks about group cohesiveness being a very important attribute, which determines the productivity of the group, and the degree of members’ engagement with the group. He looks at eight different factors that promote group cohesiveness, including cooperation, competition and teachers’ leadership styles. Zoltán goes on to discuss group norms – the rules and regulations that govern classroom life, as well as unproductive norms. 1. 2. 3.

Environment and climate change Cookies on the New Scientist website close Our website uses cookies, which are small text files that are widely used in order to make websites work more effectively. To continue using our website and consent to the use of cookies, click away from this box or click 'Close' Find out about our cookies and how to change them Environment Log in Your login is case sensitive I have forgotten my password close My New Scientist Look for Science Jobs IPCC: World must adapt to unknown climate future Metal-eating plants could mine riches through roots Slow-motion tremors make Tokyo megaquake more likely TODAY: 14:00 16 April 2014 Increasingly frequent slow-slip earthquakes, coupled with the after-effects of the 2011 Tōhoku megaquake, may be pushing the Tokyo area towards disaster What climate change has done to Walden's woods REVIEW: 20:00 15 April 2014 A hymn to citizen science, Walden Warming by Richard Primack seeks the reality of climate change in the effects that ordinary people have recorded Most read Subscribe

Speaking aids Probably you agree that these little things make a lot of difference and it is with good reason why people spend time, money and energy to get the right small objects to help them put themselves and their loved ones into the right mood. Why use speaking aids Post-it notes Walls Coloured paper Small objects To control turn-taking As metaphors Conclusion Why use speaking aids In contrast, we often expect that our students have the right mood to speak without having anything that would help them to be in the right mood to speak, or any prompt that would help the flow of ideas. Post-it notes Post-it notes are great conversation starters. To practise the simple past e.g., get them to write a name, a date and a place that is important to them. Walls Walls of your classroom can be given meanings such as: Agree - disagree: Ask students to position themselves between the two walls to express their opinion on a statement e.g. Original idea by Karen Sekiguchi

Motivating speaking activities for lower levels | TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC Planning time has been shown to increase production in speaking tasks. Lower level learners often find it especially difficult to speak spontaneously, so these activities incorporate 'thinking time' during which learners can prepare for speaking by planning what they are going to say, and asking the teacher or using a dictionary to look up missing vocabulary. The following activities are relatively short, with minimal materials preparation time for the teacher. They are designed for use as a warmer or a filler in the middle or at the end of a class. 1. This activity is good for activating existing vocabulary or revising vocabulary studied in previous lessons. Procedure Choose a vocabulary topic (this can be vocabulary you have recently studied or a topic you want to introduce). A faster-moving, fun alternative to this activity is a team game. 2. 3. This is a variation on the above activity and is great for practising adjectives. Cartoons, cartoon stories and unusual pictures 4. 5. 6.

Total physical response - TPR Where is it from? How can I use it in class? When should I use it? Where is it from? TPR stands for Total Physical Response and was created by Dr. How can I use it in class? In the classroom the teacher plays the role of parent. It is more effective if the students are standing in a circle around the teacher and you can even encourage them to walk around as they do the action. When should I use it? TPR can be used to teach and practise many things. Vocabulary connected with actions (smile, chop, headache, wriggle) Tenses past/present/future and continuous aspects (Every morning I clean my teeth, I make my bed, I eat breakfast) Classroom language (Open your books) Imperatives/Instructions (Stand up, close your eyes) Storytelling It can be adapted for all kinds of teaching situations, you just need to use your imagination! Why should I use it in the classroom? It is a lot of fun, students enjoy it and it can be a real stirrer in the class. A few useful variations

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